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RiverRipper's Guide to Energy

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RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2009, 07:22
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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2009, 15:33
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ExxonMobil: World Largest Non-National Integrated Oil Company
http://www.exxonmobil.com/USA-English/H ... at_mba.asp

Recruiting: They have a well developed process at their core schools. They strongly favor people on their closed lists, getting R2 interviews is much harder if you come in off the open list. Fit is very important since they picture people as career hires not just as summer or short-time hires. You have to sell that you fit in with their conservative nature, are very passionate not just about energy but about oil...having some background that you can position as related helps. Besides people with energy backgrounds, they tend to favor engineers for their GM program, military folks, and people with strong leadership and technical skills. Interviews will be behavioral and fit based, depending on the interviewer they can be challenging and ask unusual questions that are unexpected for people prepared for basic behavioral interviews.

Large MBA recruiting program from many Top Tier and regional B-schools. There are four overall areas that MBA’s will feed into. Upstream (Houston), Chemical (Houston), Downstream (Fairfax VA), and Global Services (Houston and Fairfax)...some finance/treasury positions are in corporate HQ (Dallas area). There are multiple businesses within these areas that people are placed into and it depends on needs of each business unit each year.

They are INCREASINGtheir recruitment of MBA’s and are expanding not just the numbers but where they are placing recruits. Many of their managers are close to retirement, so they need to fill the pipeline with young talent who can advance quickly and have broad skills to take over. They recruit at a lot of schools, from the ultra-elites to regional schools...the more desirable positions and higher pay definitely seem to go to the top schools they recruit at.

Exxon’s upward career progression favors the GM people over the pure finance folks, and willingness to go overseas is basically a must if you want to move up. They also strongly favor folks with technical/engineering backgrounds, if you don’t have this background its harder to get into the company and you are more likely to hit a ceiling. It is a huge corporation and is conservative in both its operation and personality; you most likely will wear a suit to work. The formal work environment can be tough for people who can’t function in that environment but they provide amazing opportunities for those who can successfully navigate the bureaucracy.

Most people who start there end up being career long employees and for good reasons. Great job security, lots of opportunity for advancement, and great benefits. Amazing work life balance, 40 hour weeks are the norm and talented people never leave based on compensation. The toughest thing is the expectation to be geographically flexible in terms of living for a few years abroad. However, they have amazing reputation for what they provide people in terms of assistance with the move and expat packages. And they love people who are willing to go to less desirable locations such as Africa.

Exxon Recruiting wrote:
ExxonMobil provides an unmatched career and leadership development experience for MBA students. Every MBA hired into the company is considered to be a future leader, and their career is tracked and reviewed annually by senior management and HR. As a truly global company that conducts business in approximately 175 countries, ExxonMobil is dedicated to developing leaders that are prepared for significant management and financial responsibility. Please review our corporate website for details on ExxonMobil’s expansive business operations in the chemical and petroleum/energy industries.
• Both Domestic and International work locations – this can be accomplished by either travel or a formal relocation
• Headquarters and Field assignments – assignments are balanced between the three headquarter locations (Dallas, Houston, and Fairfax, VA) and field assignments globally Analytical and Managerial focused assignments
• Multifunction assignments – assignments that seek to develop skills in marketing, finance, operations, and other areas
• Multi-company assignments – While an employee’s development is tracked through their original hiring company, employees are often cross-trained within other ExxonMobil companies.

General Management: Rotate their people every 18 to 24 months through a variety of job functions. Such as marketing, strategy, development, operations...you name it there is a chance you might end up doing it. The program is not a typical structure like a GE program, rotations are longer to allow you to really dig in and develop skills in that area. Probably the best opportunities in the oil industry for people who want to go into GM. Nothing on their site really about this program, they do have some info on positions that some GM people start in or rotate through.
Example of a GM type starting position: Global Marketing: Chemical

Finance Careers: Great program, you will have plenty of opportunities to advance but the sense is that it may not have as great of opportunities as some of the GM areas. More silo’ed in finance functions than the programs at some competitors. Treasury will give put you in the same location as the C-level employees, which and seems to be the more desirable of the finance areas.
Controllers MBA Program
Controllers Brochure
Treasurers MBA Program

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RiverRipper's Guide to Big Oil [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2009, 15:03
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Big Oil:
If you don’t have any ethical issues with big oil this is one of the best places to be if you are very interested in energy. These companies are among the world’s largest companies and offer amazing career opportunities for MBA’s. Different companies provide better opportunities for different career paths, they are headquartered in a variety of locations, some value MBA’s much more than others, and some recruit in much larger numbers.

Advantages of Big Oil:
The most lucrative energy field to be: The compensation and benefits packages are among the best you will find post MBA without living in hotels and flying every week.
Career growth: there is always somewhere to move up to their massive size and due to a their hiring patterns management is made up of older folks, so there is a lot of need to fill these spots going forward.
Scope of Projects: You can be managing hundreds of millions if not billions of dollars a year relatively early in your career. The scale of everything in the industry is absolutely massive.
Job Security: Despite all the talk of getting away from our “addiction” to oil, the world will rely on oil for many years to come. In reality the world will still be running on oil when we retire in 30 years.
International Opportunities: It is almost a 100% guarantee that you will have multiple chances to live for a period of time overseas.
Dynamic Industry: There are bound to be big changes in the industry, from supply and demand issues to the environmental concerns...you wont be bored.

Disadvantages of Big Oil:
Personal Feelings: Simply put some people could never in a million years work for an oil company.
International Opportunities: You are just as likely to be sent to Nigeria or Angola as you are London or Singapore. If you don’t go then you are going to be hurting your long term opportunities.
Conservative Nature: Due to the size of investments they are pretty careful with choosing them.
Politics: Are bound to play a bigger role going forward...from US policies to the nationalizing of oil deposits. Though this will make things more dynamic and interesting from a management view point.
Some positions are very hard to get into, and they recruit mainly from a handful of schools. If you aren’t at one of those schools it will be very hard to get into those areas.

Info on the major companies to follow...

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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2009, 15:36
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Chevron: Second Largest Integrated Oil Company in the US
Locations: San Ramon (Bay Area) and Houston
http://careers.chevron.com/students/mba ... fault.aspx
Program Brochure


Recruit mainly from top tier schools and McCombs. They don’t bring in the total volume that Exxon does but the numbers into the choice spots are probably pretty equal. The main paths seem to be Finance and Marketing, Global Gas and Supply & Trading are smaller areas, but provides some of the more interesting opportunities.

Their numbers were about steady this year, they don’t seem to have nearly as big of an age gap as Exxon...especially in the finance area where their program is one of the longest running and best programs available for people interested in corporate finance. Their recruiting is definitely more focused on elite school than Exxon, and they have a more select core set of schools for the best gigs.

Recruiting, they have a well developed process at their core schools for their two big areas (Finance and Marketing). They have will come in the fall and do presentations. Finance interviews will be behavioral and fit based, 1st rounds are not that difficult but having finance experience will help. Marketing is two interviews, fit and behavioral, then a case. The case is more along the lines of a MC case than a marketing case...so if you want to target this do case prep with some MC people to get the frameworks and stuff down.

Chevron’s upward career progression favors the Finance people over the other areas. It’s starts as a two year rotational program, where one rotation is typically spent overseas (You guys picking up on that theme in the oil industry yet). They don’t have as strong of a preference for folks with technical/engineering backgrounds, but that or experience in the energy industry wont hurt. Chevron is much less formal it definitely has one of the looser cultures in the oil industry, dress is b-casual. This is not to say they aren’t conservative, due to the business they definitely are...though they don’t have the reputation of being as disciplined as Exxon with their strategy.

Once again, the place is filled with career employees...they like most oil companies have an amazing retention rate for their MBA’s. They have the same great job security, advancement opportunities and they pay well (not Exxon high but definitely towards the top of the scale). They too really want their people to be geographically flexible in terms of overseas. Location is preferable for some people...the bay area appeals to many more people. However, you will get the same paycheck if you are San Ramon or Houston.

Finance Careers: Probably the best finance program in big oil, 4 rotations over two years...one of which typically is overseas. Many senior executives passed through the program...including the CFO (Kellogg grad). Finance in Chevron will give you chances to possibly do some strategy work which is typically filled by GM folks in other companies. They don’t break their finance up into separate programs...you will do treasury, audit, comptrollers, investor relations, etc. However, it is a small program (10 or so a year) and they only hire out of a handful of schools. If you make into this program it offers some excellent opportunities.
Finance Development Program

Marketing: More GM than pure marketing, but less GM than Exxon since it is all very brand/customer focused. First two rotations are 6 months and are marketing based, one will be global and one will be customer facing. The third rotation is a year long and is an operations type role within their retail business. One month of this rotation will have your working at a retail outlet (you will work at a gas station)...dont worry you will be highest paid gas station attendant in history. It’s a structured program, and will give you pretty good exposure to the downstream side of Chevron but exposure to areas outside of brand and retail areas is limited. Chances of moving into upstream out of this area are minimal.
Global Marketing

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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 23 Mar 2009, 08:02
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prashok wrote:
Do job functions dictate hiring requirements as well?

I would say that is true for most companies. However, I think most positions top tier MBA's recruit into are high level corporate entry points. The companies that send you to operations positions usually do it after several years and in a management position. Some will have you run finance, procurement, or functions like that for a large site fairly very early on but it usually take at minimum at several years.

Most alums I talked to that are well into their careers have operations but often these were in higher level management positions and the first one was 3 to 5 years into their career. Remember I am also looking at GM positions which take far more hands on roll in operations. Finance people might run on site finance duties but I think it would be very rare to have a "operations" role. Marketing people at some companies might take responsbility of a region of retail outlets (much more common at some companies, like Chevron). Some companies have strategy paths that people might get into operations positions out of.

One thing to remember is once you are hired and finish your initial rotation or job functions where you go is often up to you. You have to use your network, find opportunities, and make it happen. People arent going to hold your hand nearly as much 5 years into your career as they will 1 year in. To move up in the GM path you will want an operations positions or else you will limit your career growth since you wont have a view of everything you need to. If you are OK with moving up the finance silo, marketing silo, or something like that...then operations might help you but lacking it wont hold you back.

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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2009, 18:55
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refurb wrote:
It appears that the energy sector, or at least the oil industry, is not very "career switcher" friendly. At least not to those who don't have the experience or educational background they are looking for.

Is that a fair assessment in general?

Definitely not and remember you are talking about Exxon not all energy or even oil companies. However, each company does have their preferences and other companies have different ones. By the definition of career switcher energy as a whole is very open to it. I think most people going into it weren't in the energy field and even those with engineering degrees werent all actual engineers. Some were consultants, or in sales/marketing, or in any number of other job functions. Those that have energy backgrounds do extremely well with getting jobs, but that is common with every industry..whether you are talking about CPG, Healthcare, or banking. That just has to do with companies knowing that those individuals can show up and hit the ground running so to speak.

One thing I have noticed is that a lot of general management job descriptions seem to prefer engineering undergrad degrees. I think a lot of that has to do with many of the companies that have "GM" career paths being manufacturing/industrial companies. The career path to the top management postions varies by industry, for example CPG and Healthcare tend to use marketing. The GM paths are common in areas that rely heavily on engineering as it is, so being able to understand the products and how they are produced is a huge advantage for managers to have.

Career switching is definitely possible, the key is how you frame your skills and how you market yourself. GM positions want analytic skills, so you dont have to have a technical degree to show you have that but its assumed if you can handle the course work of an engineering degree you can succesfully analyze data. However, you could have the greatest engineering background in the world but if you cant show that you have leadership skills you arent getting a GM position either. So the key is to show you have the analytical skills no matter what your degree or work experience and to show that you can effectively lead people and manage projects.

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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 08 Aug 2009, 14:44
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Since school is fast approaching and most people are done with work, if you are looking to enter the energy industry and have some time to sit down and read up on the industry. I highly recommend getting The Prize, it is pretty much the bible of the oil industry. I read it several years ago and just recieved a new copy which has some newer material. It will give you a great understanding of how the industry has been formed over the last hundred years and it is very well written (it did win a pulitzer).

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/143911 ... 1439110123

I plan on adding some information on this thread in a few more weeks when I have some spare time.

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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 10 Aug 2009, 21:31
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Here is a previous blog post I made for the Consortium Energy Network.

"The Epic Quest for Oil, Money, & Power
Well I’m finally back from some much needed vacation. I spent the last week in Colorado, fly fishing an area of the South Platte River known as the “Dream Stream.” I really enjoy Colorado, and the people I meet streamside. I was surprised how many people I met asked me about the new Oil & Gas laws implemented in Colorado, to protect fisheries from contamination, and how the new regulations might impact the economy of Colorado.

Before I go down the path of regulations, green energy, sustainability, clean tech, and many of the other “hot” topics, I thought this would be an excellent time to talk about how we got here. Understanding the history of the industry plays an important part in knowing where we are going and the growing challenges we’ll face.

Instead of me trying to recap the history I know together into a blog post – I’ll give some references I used in undergrad recruiting and others that have been recommended to me as a Chevron employee.

1. The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money, & Power by Daniel Yergin (Amazon)

2. For those of you who don’t want to sit down to read 928 pages of The Prize, you can try - Empires of Industry: Black Gold: The Story of Oil (documentary by the History Channel). You can also find this one on Netflix so if you are a member put it in your queue or download it right to your computer. (Amazon) (Netflix)

3. The Vault Guide to Top Energy Employers – this is a nice supplement to a company’s website or basic marketing materials.

4. Good ol’ Wikipedia - History of the Petroleum Industry

5. Post your favorite history sources as comments!

Remember learning as much as you can about the industry and the specific company you are targeting is going to be a big help in recruiting. Hopefully, we’ll get to some talking points, as well as some industry lingo that will help you carry a conversation with industry professionals and recruiters.

“Laissez Les Bon Temps Rouler & Geaux Blue!”
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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2009, 17:08
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refurb wrote:
River, could you expand on what they mean by "technical discipline"? I assume that would be things that relate to the energy industry? Geology?

The sense I got was that the preference is for engineering, or something hard science or extremely analytical in nature. Computer Science, physics, chemistry, etc. I think if you were doing geology in the energy industry that would definitely give you a shot. However, if you were a liberal arts major who worked in some soft skill job...well then your chances are extremely slim. This isnt just something they say they prefer, it really is something they value. One thing I appreciate is that they are upfront about this preference unlike some companies who have internal preferences but they dont publish these and the only way you find out is 2nd hand

For a point of reference...I know the only non-engineer degree to get a 2nd round interview at Kellogg this year was an economy major who was going for finance.

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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2009, 07:12
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Just so you know the thing about relocation in the Energy field has less to do with relocation and more about learning the core business. If you really want to move your way up through the upstream ranks spending some time in Africa (or Australia for gas), business development in Asia, or some gulf of mexico activities helps out a lot. So if your goal is to be the CEO of an energy comany you really need to know the ins and outs of the business. If you want to be a commodities trader, you can get away with just working in Houston or some time in London but it won't be necessary.

For the most part people relocate because they want to not because they have to.
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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2009, 09:34
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mbafwi wrote:
River, do you think people who recruit for these rotation programs are more interested in energy or getting some good GM experience? what if one wants the latter, but has no real interest in oil wells? do people fake it or what?


I would not recommend faking interest, I'm sure most people can tell the difference between people who want to be in the industry and people who want to make money and not really work the hours of other industries.

My suggestion to you is to figure out what you are passionate about and then look inside of the different companies for division or jobs that might suit your goals. If you really like VC - you could work in an alternative energy technology VC group inside of one of the big companies. How many VC opportunities allow you to tackle some of the largest problems faced by mankind? If you love corporate finance there are a ton of rewarding positions that will put you in different divisions and give you a different experience every time you change positions. There are internal consultants, marketing, tradering, logistics, contracts, accounting, hitech jobs, IT - the list really goes on and on.

What you want to show is that you want to work in xyz group because you think your skills will contribute to a company/team that will help tackle the world energy issues. Once you understand how complicated it is to go from finding oil to getting it to the customer you will understand why there are so many opportunities inside the industry.
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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 27 Aug 2009, 17:18
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What language to learn...it really varies by company and where you want to go during your career. Portuguese is pretty good these days with lots of stuff happening in Angola and Brazil, both of which are Portuguese speaking. Spanish, Dutch, German, Czech, Russian, French Japanese, etc. Oil is completely global and if you know a language you certainly could work that to go to a location. My advice, pick a language for a place you want to go. If you really want to work in Rotterdam then learn Dutch, etc.

I dont think many people who end up in oil have had long standing dreams about going into it. There are lots of things to get you excited about it. The career path is interesting, you will see a lot of cool things during your career and the scale of things is amazing. You could be dealing responsible for billions of dollar several years out of school. It is probably the most global industry in the world, the major oil companies operate in almost every single country on earth...the only ones they don't are usually because of political reasons or they are so unstable its not worth the risk.

Career progression can be very impressive, the pay and benefits are top notch...how many places still have pension plans and match 7% on your 401K. They tend to be towards the high end of the pay scale when you graduate and as you advance the pay increases are substantial. You will be treated as a high potential person who is expected to reach the executive ranks, and thus you get a lot of attention and responsibility.

The GM path at some companies is also one of the most broadbased things you will ever do. Not many places will put you incharge of marketing, then move you into a supervisor role at an industrial plant, then make you a trader, then put you in an operations role, and if strategy interests you then they may just stick you in that too. I have seen people who have just such interesting career paths and all within 10-15 years.

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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2010, 06:43
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I'm working for an oil company right now before my MBA and I can see the advantage of learning a language. I would like to recommend French for consideration, because it is surprisingly prevalent in oil destinations throughout Africa. And the difference between a village in Congo and Paris is that in Paris, the person you are talking to probably speaks some English, or at least the other guy in the room does. So it's really important to know some French if you want to be understood outside of work situations - negotiating with customs officers at the airport, directing a taxi driver or ordering food in a restaurant.

However, in work, as other posters have said, most of your colleagues will be expats or westernized locals with decent English. Even if you've done your Berlitz classes or whatever, these guys are going to speak English better than you speak the local lingo and the meeting will move way faster in English.

So learn the language to make your life easier, but don't put it too high on your priority list. Oil companies will pay for training anyway - I got 60 hours of one-on-one tuition when I arrived in Italy. Molto bene!

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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 21 Mar 2009, 15:41
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Royal Dutch Shell: World’s Second Largest Integrated Oil Company
http://www.shell.com/home/content/caree ... _graduate/

Conoco Phillips: Third Largest Integrated Oil Company in the US
http://www.conocophillips.com/careers/U ... /index.htm

British Petroleum (BP): World’s 3rd Largest oil company
http://www.bp.com/sectiongenericarticle ... Id=7017455

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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 22 Mar 2009, 07:53
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Prashok, I think if you look at employees from top tier MBA's very few have oil experience prior to school. Almost none of the alums I talked to had any experience in the oil industry prior to their MBA's. My friends work work as engineers in the oil industry wouldnt bother going back fulltime since they already make great money and have opportunities to move up, and they would have the chance to get MBA's PT if they wanted. However, I bet there are far more people with prior oil experience coming out of schools like McCombs and Rice. Out of the 8 people I know who got offers from oil companies here this year not one worked in the oil industry before.


***updated Chevron...

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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2009, 15:47
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unhedged wrote:
River,

What is your thoughts on the culture and nature of work at the utilities? I was speaking to an old friend who now works for a major utility and he stated while the pay is good, the work can tend to be boring. He mentioned that the unregulated division of his company was a much more interesting place to be working.

Also, looking at your list, I was curious if you considered SDG&E and Gas Company as potential major employers as well, or just considered them subsidiaries of Sempra?

I think there is a huge variation in MBA careers in the utility industry...at least straight out of school. The major utilities have MBA programs (Duke, PG&E, Exelon, PSEG, Dominion, etc.), and recruit. How they recruit really varies as does how well they pay. I believe PG&E not only has the most well developed program and recruiting strategy, but they are at the upper end of the pay scale. Utilities dont pay what oil companies do, and also trail things like widely diversified and tech companies. Hours can be longer depending on your area. There are some interesting businesses but like all companies there are going to be some boring areas.

From what I have seen, its usually parent companies who recruit and then move people around. A lot of utilities have a large number of subsidiaries to limit their liabilities. I know one company I interview with hires corporately but will send you to different units for your job...the "parent" company is actually a pretty small operation.

I think Utillities do offer some great opportunities, and going forward there will be lots of interesting place in them for MBA's willing to look for the right fit. I think california will be one of the more interesting places to be due to their renewables mandate. Utilities will be investing billions in their infastructure in the next few years, this will provide a lot of interesting and meaningful projects for people with MBAs. Another big advantage of utilities is there is a great deal of geographic mobility for people joining. If you start at one company and several years later want to move to a different part of the country...chances are that there is going to be a large utility or two in the region.

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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2009, 16:09
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refurb wrote:
Care to comment on the cyclical nature of the oil industry?

My father worked for a major oil/gas company in Canada and we had to relocate a couple times. When times were good, the money just flowed, but when oil prices dropped a lot of people were laid off and offices were closed and consolidated.

Relocation in most careers is something you need to be willing to do. However, oil companies are running much more lean than they did 10 years ago and like you said they have done a ton of consolidation. ExxonMobil currently employs about the number of people Exxon did alone when they merged. So this means that they eliminated the number of folks as Mobil employed. Layoffs of the MBA types doesnt seem to happen nearly as much, its harder to bring on a contractor in these areas and talking with alums at oil companies very few in their ranks were let go even when companies were making massive cuts.

I am not too worried about job security. If you look at the age distribution of employees in the ranks where MBA's go, it is filled with a lot of people who are within 5 years of retirement. This provides not only to good job security but also lots of higher level places for people to advance into.

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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2009, 08:02
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spiridon wrote:
What do you guys think are the best MBA programs to get into energy companies in bay/houston area? I am thinking of UT and Rice as their first base to recruit from

They are both great options, Rice and McCombs both have great reps in Texas and in oil companies (McCombs brand is definitely stronger). That said these are some of the more choice gigs at those schools so you will face far more competition for them than you will at a top 10 school. At Kellogg I think the people who were very serious about oil ended up with offers. Some companies recruit for some areas only from top schools and it seems they also have different pay structures. The base offer here from some companies is higher than the max salaries coming out of other schools, and one recruiter actually mentioned top tier school grads get higher pay and more significant jobs...however, with that comes higher expectations.

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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2009, 09:38
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I should also note the lack of GM programs in the industry is mostly due to knowledge of the business. Oil companies prefer to take a successful engineer and let him try his hand at managing than to try to make a manager understand oil. I worked in an internal IT organization and the CIO was a chemical engineer all the way down to my bosses boss who was a geoscientist (about 4-5 layers of people all industry trained not IT trained) before you get to the IT guys at the very bottom.

There are people who overcome this but they do it by proving they have great knowledge and breadth about the entire process, thus the oversees positions, which by the way usually come with a driver and a fancy house + a very very nice pay increase.
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Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy [#permalink] New post 27 Aug 2009, 16:08
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domtri33 wrote:
river/lsuguy07,

Have been stewing on this one for a bit and thought your responses may be beneficial to more others as well.

You guys keep talking about showing "passion" for the industry. How exactly does one with no past oil/energy experience exactly do that? I mean the things that draw me to GM in the oil industry have more to do with leadership opportunities, diversity in career path, the scale of the industry, etc, and less to do with a burning passion to fly out to some far reach of the globe wildcatting for oil because its been my dream ever since I was born in the shadow of an oil rig in Texas.

All kidding aside though, the things that I am passionate about in business (leading teams, having responsibility, international opportunities, getting things done under pressure, etc) all seem to occur in the oil industry. Thus my interest. But how do I translate this into a passion for "energy"?


Response from riverripper taken from the MMM thread in the Ambassadors section:

riverripper wrote:
If you want energy MMM might give you a slight edge but honestly networking and showing passion for the industry will do far more. If a school has an energy club get heavily involved, if they do an energy trek spend the money and go on it (Kellogg is going to have two this year an Oil one in the fall and a clean energy one in the Spring). Oil recruits traditionally and there are plenty of recent grads there, reach other to everyone you can because I can tell you for a fact the recruiters check up on that. Renewables recruire networking just to find the opportunities.
Re: RiverRipper's Guide to Energy   [#permalink] 27 Aug 2009, 16:08
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