Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 31 Oct 2014, 03:36

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Sales of United States manufactured goods to

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
VP
VP
avatar
Joined: 18 Nov 2004
Posts: 1447
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 0

Sales of United States manufactured goods to [#permalink] New post 10 Mar 2005, 08:45
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

43% (01:38) correct 57% (00:46) wrong based on 4 sessions
18. Sales of United States manufactured goods to nonindustrialized countries rose to $167 billion in 1992, which is 14 percent more than the previous year and largely offsets weak demand from Europe and Japan.

(A) which is 14 percent more than the previous year
(B) which is 14 percent higher than it was the previous year
(C) 14 percent higher than the previous year's figure
(D) an amount that is 14 percent more than the previous year was
(E) an amount that is 14 percent higher than the previous year's figure
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 04 Jul 2004
Posts: 905
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 21 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 10 Mar 2005, 16:56
banerjeea_98 wrote:
why "E", why not "B" ?


because here which is introducing a non-restrictive clause and thus "which" should modify immediate Noun preceding comma. So, here it is modifying year 1992.

(B) also has same problem.
(C): run on sentence
(D): more than is not correct.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 25 Jan 2004
Posts: 728
Location: Milwaukee
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 10 Mar 2005, 21:47
jpv, that is not always true, especially when you have a prepositional phrase behind which

Anyway,what is the OA on this?
_________________

Praveen

SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 03 Jan 2005
Posts: 2251
Followers: 12

Kudos [?]: 204 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 10 Mar 2005, 23:06
jpv wrote:
praveen_rao7 wrote:
jpv, that is not always true, especially when you have a prepositional phrase behind which

Anyway,what is the OA on this?


Please provide some examples...


The little green house on that mountain, which is built by myself ten years ago, somehow has disappeared when I came back from my trip to the Europe.

Is the which not right? I mean of couse I wouldn't have build that mountain.
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 07 Jul 2004
Posts: 5095
Location: Singapore
Followers: 19

Kudos [?]: 155 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 10 Mar 2005, 23:21
A and B are out. using 'which' to introduce the modifier '14%...." incorrectly modifies the action 'rose'

we need 'an amount' to clearly state what we're referring to. 'higher is idomatic to more'.

E it is.
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
avatar
Joined: 15 Dec 2003
Posts: 4318
Followers: 24

Kudos [?]: 177 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 05:38
"which" could be used as a restrictive or non-restrictive clause. Also, "which", as Praveen said, does not always refer to the immediately preceding word. Sometimes, "which", much like an absolute phrase does, will refer to the previous sentence as a whole.

ie My brother got 95% in his exam, which really surprised me given the amount of studying he put in.

"which" here does not refer to subject of prepositional phrase "exam" as Praveen said.

That said, I believe best answer is E because b/w two answer choices in GMAT world, if one has a clear referrent as E does, I would pick it over B
_________________

Best Regards,

Paul


Last edited by Paul on 11 Mar 2005, 06:37, edited 1 time in total.
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 13 Jan 2005
Posts: 39
Location: Moscow, Russia
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 0

Re: SC#18 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 05:57
banerjeea_98 wrote:
18. Sales of United States manufactured goods to nonindustrialized countries rose to $167 billion in 1992, which is 14 percent more than the previous year and largely offsets weak demand from Europe and Japan.

(A) which is 14 percent more than the previous year
(B) which is 14 percent higher than it was the previous year
(C) 14 percent higher than the previous year's figure
(D) an amount that is 14 percent more than the previous year was
(E) an amount that is 14 percent higher than the previous year's figure


I think B lacks IN before THE PREVIOUS YEAR and IT in B hasn't strong reference
VP
VP
avatar
Joined: 18 Nov 2004
Posts: 1447
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 16 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 07:51
I chose "B" as well, but OA is "E"...no OE.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2004
Posts: 459
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 10:07
banerjeea_98 wrote:
why "E", why not "B" ?


you are comparing the number here, "an amount" better matches with "167 Billion".
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 25 Jan 2004
Posts: 728
Location: Milwaukee
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 10 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 10:43
Thanks for your comments Paul & HongHu

I guess in my opinion main thing this is differenciating choice B & E is use of more vs higher

I tried to look up on Google to get a better understanding on when to use one over the other, but was unsuccessful

Can anybody throw some light on more vs higher?. Thanks


I think more is for objects higher is for numbers?????
_________________

Praveen

SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 03 Jan 2005
Posts: 2251
Followers: 12

Kudos [?]: 204 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 12:03
Paul wrote:
"which" could be used as a restrictive or non-restrictive clause. Also, "which", as Praveen said, does not always refer to the immediately preceding word. Sometimes, "which", much like an absolute phrase does, will refer to the previous sentence as a whole.

ie My brother got 95% in his exam, which really surprised me given the amount of studying he put in.

"which" here does not refer to subject of prepositional phrase "exam" as Praveen said.

That said, I believe best answer is E because b/w two answer choices in GMAT world, if one has a clear referrent as E does, I would pick it over B


I agree totally. In GMAT world "which" has to point to a clear referrent (even if it is not necessarily immediately before the comma). In (B) "which" doesn't have a clear referrent.
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 19 Nov 2004
Posts: 565
Location: SF Bay Area, USA
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 37 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 12:30
If the sentence were:
"Sales of United States manufactured goods to nonindustrialized countries, which is 14 ...."

then 'which' clearly refers to the subject 'sales' after ignoring the prepositional phrase "of United States manufactured goods to nonindustrialized countries"

I learnt to ignore prep phrases and parenthetical elements to find the correct subject from the following post: http://www.gmatclub.com/phpbb/viewtopic ... c&start=20

But here the sentence (choice B) starts with a clause
"Sales of United States manufactured goods to nonindustrialized countries rose to $167 billion in 1992, which is 14 ..."

Ignoring the prep phrases the sentence can be written as "Sales rose, which is .."
=> which does not refer to the subject Sales clearly as we have the verb in between.

Does 'which' in "Sales rose, which is ..", refer to the concept of "increase in sales" as in the sentence My brother got 95% in his exam, which really surprised me given the amount of studying he put in making it still correct?

Still a bit confused. Correct me if my understanding is wrong
[/i]
Director
Director
avatar
Joined: 04 Jul 2004
Posts: 905
Followers: 3

Kudos [?]: 21 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 11 Mar 2005, 18:25
nocilis wrote:
Does 'which' in "Sales rose, which is ..", refer to the concept of "increase in sales" as in the sentence My brother got 95% in his exam, which really surprised me given the amount of studying he put in making it still correct?

Still a bit confused. Correct me if my understanding is wrong
[/i]


I think ur logic makes sense. Here (B) can not be correct since sentence is using a verb (rose) and paranthetical element (14 percent higher than the previous year's figure) is crying for "sales".

Thank you all for such a nice discussion.. :cool
  [#permalink] 11 Mar 2005, 18:25
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
1 Sales of United States manufactured goods to vivektripathi 4 19 Sep 2008, 23:49
Sales of United States manufactured goods to Amardeep Sharma 7 29 Nov 2007, 17:23
Sales of United States manufactured goods to bmwhype2 4 15 Jul 2007, 14:05
Sales of United States manufactured goods to nitinneha 2 11 Apr 2007, 15:22
Sales of United States manufactured goods to binho12 4 09 Oct 2006, 05:04
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Sales of United States manufactured goods to

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.