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SC-BYRON [#permalink] New post 08 Feb 2008, 17:16
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A
B
C
D
E

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0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
I know this was posted before, but can someone please explain?


Like Byron at Missolonghi, Jack London was slowly killed by the mistakes of the medical men who treated him.



A Like Byron
B Like Byron's death
C Just as Byron died
D Similar to Byron
E As did Byron

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Re: SC-BYRON [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2008, 01:10
Like vs. as usage issue

A Like Byron [Like is used to compare two nouns or used in situations in which two similarities being pointed out – Hold it]
B Like Byron's death [Comparison between Byron’s death and Jack London – eliminate it]
C Just as Byron died [Comparison between clause introduced by “as” and noun – eliminate it]
D Similar to Byron [like is better choice – eliminate it]
E As did Byron [Comparison between clause introduced by “as” and noun – eliminate it]

Answer: A

More information:
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/conjunctions.htm#like
As is used to introduce a clause:
• As I told you earlier, the lecture has been postponed.
Like is used for situations in which similarities are being pointed out:
• This community college is like a two-year liberal arts college.
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Re: SC-BYRON [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2008, 08:04
I disagree to an extent with you hanumayamma.

I had selected E for the answer and obviously its wrong. But I am not satisfied with your elimination reasoning for the same.

I must confess I checked in net for some other occurances and found the following ....

> > I agree with answer A, this would be exactly how I would speak the
> > language. However, after a lot of GMATsentencecorrectionreview, I
> > came across the concept of 'parallel comparison'. Here, we are
> > comparing answer choices with 'Jack London was slow killed'. Thus,
> > should we choose answer choice E instead
>
> I would have said 'A'.
>
> 'E' is not parallel because it is in active voice, not passive as in the
> second phrase.
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Re: SC-BYRON [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2008, 08:05
A good question on parallel structure infact.
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Re: SC-BYRON [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2008, 17:01
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huntgmat,

Thanks for your honest disagreement.
I too stumble for “as” choice initially. But, “like” is a preposition and used to connect phrases where as “as” is a conjunction that is used to conjunct two clauses.

I have gathered following good information from following sites: hope this information helps

http://www.bartleby.com/64/C001/033.html

Like is often used as a conjunction meaning “as” or “as if.” In fact, writers since Chaucer’s time have used like as a conjunction. But language critics and writing handbooks have condemned this use of like for more than a century, and a writer who uses it in formal style risks being tarred with their brush. If you want to avoid this fate, use as or as if instead: Sales of new models rose as (not like) we expected them to. He ran as if (not like) his life depended on it. Note, however, that there is sometimes a subtle difference between like and as if. With like, there is often a stronger suggestion that the following clause is true. For example, the sentence The teachers treat her like she has real talent is not exactly equivalent to The teachers treat her as if she had real talent. The sentence using as if implies that her talent could be in doubt.

http://www.bartleby.com/64/C001/012.html#AS

as … as versus so … as. A traditional usage rule draws a distinction between comparisons using as … as and comparisons using so … as. The rule states that the so … as construction is required in negative sentences (as in Shakespeare’s “’tis not so deep as a well”), in questions (as in Is it so bad as she says?), and in certain if clauses (as in If it is so bad as you say, you ought to leave). But this so … as construction is becoming increasingly rare in American English, and the use of as … as is now entirely acceptable in all contexts.

And lastly, Parallel structure must be established on similar entities. For example: Verb – Verb, Noun-Noun or Pronoun-Pronoun.

Here is another question from OG-11 that has very good explanation in OG book.

Q:122


http://gmatclub.com/forum/11-p338346?t=48030&hilit=more+than+30+years+ago+Dr.+Barbara#p338346
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Re: SC-BYRON [#permalink] New post 30 Sep 2008, 18:25
Stupid question - why is d) Similar to Byron

not correct?
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Re: SC-BYRON [#permalink] New post 01 Oct 2008, 05:57
Guys - I'm still wondering why is D) Similiar to

not correct? :P
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Re: SC-BYRON [#permalink] New post 01 Oct 2008, 11:18
bigfernhead wrote:
Guys - I'm still wondering why is D) Similiar to

not correct? :P


both are gramatically correct.
like [4 letters] concise than "similar to" (9 letters)
don't waste the letters :lol: :lol: :lol:

A is better that D
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Re: SC-BYRON   [#permalink] 01 Oct 2008, 11:18
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