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SC: Genral Wolfe

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SC: Genral Wolfe [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2008, 00:01
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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General Wolfe answered the French sentry in French, and thus the young officer tragically mistook the enemy ship as one of his own, and let Wolfe and his men slip past him to victory at Quebec.

A as one of his own, and let Wolfe
B as his own, and let Wolfe
C for one of his own, leaving Wolfe
D for one of his own, and let Wolfe
E to be his own, leaving Wolfe
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Re: SC: Genral Wolfe [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2008, 00:12
bhatiagp wrote:
General Wolfe answered the French sentry in French, and thus the young officer tragically mistook the enemy ship as one of his own, and let Wolfe and his men slip past him to victory at Quebec.

A as one of his own, and let Wolfe
B as his own, and let Wolfe
C for one of his own, leaving Wolfe
D for one of his own, and let Wolfe
E to be his own, leaving Wolfe


mistook x for y.

either C or D. I believe it's C. D sounds as if the sentry committed two separate mistakes.
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Re: SC: Genral Wolfe [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2008, 10:20
bhatiagp wrote:
General Wolfe answered the French sentry in French, and thus the young officer tragically mistook the enemy ship as one of his own, and let Wolfe and his men slip past him to victory at Quebec.

A as one of his own, and let Wolfe
B as his own, and let Wolfe
C for one of his own, leaving Wolfe
D for one of his own, and let Wolfe
E to be his own, leaving Wolfe



good one.

Mistake X for Y.

C and D remains.

office mistook .... , and let (verb -pastense ) Wolfe
= officer mistook , and officer let Wolfe and his men slip past

these two are llel.

D wins.

Good question.
+1 for you
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Re: SC: Genral Wolfe [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2008, 10:33
Between C and D:
C: (leaving logically referring an action and thus cannot function as participle phrase modifying the mistook)
D wins parallel
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Re: SC: Genral Wolfe [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2008, 21:19
OA : D

The correct answer is D. The correct idiom is mistake X for Y. Thus, we can eliminate A and B for the incorrect mistake X as Y. E uses the incorrect mistake X to be Y, and therefore should also be discarded. As well, both B and E say his own, which incorrectly suggests the ship belonged to the French officer. Additionally, both C and E inappropriately use leaving rather than and let, making the rest of the sentence ungrammatical
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Re: SC: Genral Wolfe [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2008, 23:27
bhatiagp wrote:

General Wolfe answered the French sentry in French, and thus the young officer tragically mistook the enemy ship as one of his own, and let Wolfe and his men slip past him to victory at Quebec.

A as one of his own, and let Wolfe
B as his own, and let Wolfe
C for one of his own, leaving Wolfe
D for one of his own, and let Wolfe
E to be his own, leaving Wolfe


OA : D

The correct answer is D. The correct idiom is mistake X for Y. Thus, we can eliminate A and B for the incorrect mistake X as Y. E uses the incorrect mistake X to be Y, and therefore should also be discarded. As well, both B and E say his own, which incorrectly suggests the ship belonged to the French officer. Additionally, both C and E inappropriately use leaving rather than and let, making the rest of the sentence ungrammatical


What is the source of this question? I believe that "him" in "and let Wolfe and his men slip past him to victory at Quebec" is wrong. It should be "himself". Do you guys agree?
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Re: SC: Genral Wolfe [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2008, 05:10
bhatiagp wrote:
OA : D

The correct answer is D. The correct idiom is mistake X for Y. Thus, we can eliminate A and B for the incorrect mistake X as Y. E uses the incorrect mistake X to be Y, and therefore should also be discarded. As well, both B and E say his own, which incorrectly suggests the ship belonged to the French officer. Additionally, both C and E inappropriately use leaving rather than and let, making the rest of the sentence ungrammatical


I don't see anything wrong with C. why can't a participle "leaving" be used here ? I have seen several examples that use "ing" to connect a preceding clause with the latter portion of the SC.

Because " the young officer tragically mistook the enemy ship as one of his own", Wolfe and his men slip past him to victory

I think "leaving" can be used to connect the two clauses.......thoughts??
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Re: SC: Genral Wolfe [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2008, 00:13
aaron22197 wrote:
bhatiagp wrote:
OA : D

The correct answer is D. The correct idiom is mistake X for Y. Thus, we can eliminate A and B for the incorrect mistake X as Y. E uses the incorrect mistake X to be Y, and therefore should also be discarded. As well, both B and E say his own, which incorrectly suggests the ship belonged to the French officer. Additionally, both C and E inappropriately use leaving rather than and let, making the rest of the sentence ungrammatical


I don't see anything wrong with C. why can't a participle "leaving" be used here ? I have seen several examples that use "ing" to connect a preceding clause with the latter portion of the SC.

Because " the young officer tragically mistook the enemy ship as one of his own", Wolfe and his men slip past him to victory

I think "leaving" can be used to connect the two clauses.......thoughts??


I'm pretty positive that it's a wrong sentence. Mirror pronoun (himself)should be used in the last non underlined part of the sentence. Also, if one reads the sentence carefully, one will find that the sentry made only one mistake, that is mistaking Wolfe for a french. Seeing a parallelism in "and" is not right, since the two actions are not parallel. I do believe that C is better than D, although it still has the mirror pronoun issue (common to all choices). bhatigp, what is the source of this question?
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Re: SC: Genral Wolfe [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2008, 13:22
sanjay_gmat wrote:
aaron22197 wrote:
bhatiagp wrote:
OA : D

The correct answer is D. The correct idiom is mistake X for Y. Thus, we can eliminate A and B for the incorrect mistake X as Y. E uses the incorrect mistake X to be Y, and therefore should also be discarded. As well, both B and E say his own, which incorrectly suggests the ship belonged to the French officer. Additionally, both C and E inappropriately use leaving rather than and let, making the rest of the sentence ungrammatical


I don't see anything wrong with C. why can't a participle "leaving" be used here ? I have seen several examples that use "ing" to connect a preceding clause with the latter portion of the SC.

Because " the young officer tragically mistook the enemy ship as one of his own", Wolfe and his men slip past him to victory

I think "leaving" can be used to connect the two clauses.......thoughts??


I'm pretty positive that it's a wrong sentence. Mirror pronoun (himself)should be used in the last non underlined part of the sentence. Also, if one reads the sentence carefully, one will find that the sentry made only one mistake, that is mistaking Wolfe for a french. Seeing a parallelism in "and" is not right, since the two actions are not parallel. I do believe that C is better than D, although it still has the mirror pronoun issue (common to all choices). bhatigp, what is the source of this question?


Agreed - don't see why C is incorrect. "Leaving..." is clearly the result of the inadvertent action performed by the general, and the clause modifies another verb.

What is the source of this problem? Can anyone clarify why (C) is incorrect?
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Re: SC: Genral Wolfe [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2008, 17:06
bhatiagp wrote:
General Wolfe answered the French sentry in French, and thus the young officer tragically mistook the enemy ship as one of his own, and let Wolfe and his men slip past him to victory at Quebec.

A as one of his own, and let Wolfe
B as his own, and let Wolfe
C for one of his own, leaving Wolfe ->leaving to is wrong
D for one of his own, and let Wolfe -> PERFECT
E to be his own, leaving Wolfe


mistook for is the correct construct

IMO D
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Re: SC: Genral Wolfe   [#permalink] 27 Jul 2008, 17:06
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