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SC - GMAT Prep

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SC - GMAT Prep [#permalink] New post 20 Oct 2010, 10:28
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A
B
C
D
E

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  5% (low)

Question Stats:

71% (02:04) correct 28% (01:16) wrong based on 14 sessions
Hi,

Pleas provide answer with explanations. Thanks.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: SC - GMAT Prep [#permalink] New post 20 Oct 2010, 20:14
C) 'The growth'... 'exceeds that which had been for 10000 years'
D) 'The growth'... 'exceeds what it has been for 10000 years,'
E) 'The growth'... 'exceeded what it did for the 10000 years,'

C, D, E all badly formed.

Between A and B, A is the better formed.

I go with A.
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Re: SC - GMAT Prep [#permalink] New post 24 Nov 2010, 00:47
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Lots of nasty modifiers here that require careful placement. So many of the phrases in these answer choices are the same--that's a clue that it will probably be the *position* of the phrases relative to each other that determines our answer.

The first split I chose to look at was between A/B ("Between 1990...) and C/D/E (The growth...). Neither is bad in and of itself, but seeing that "the growth" is the subject of the entire sentence for C/D/E is a cue for us to check the verb associated with that subject....sure enough, C and D use the present tense verb "exceeds" so we can cross them off-- we're in 2010, so the growth mentioned is *past* growth.

Also if the subject of the sentence in choice E is "the growth of the global economy between 1990 and 2000," then the second verb doesn't make sense when you replace the pronoun "it" with its antecedent: "the growth of the global economy between 1990 and 2000" exceeded what " the growth of the global economy between 1990 and 2000" did during an earlier time period? E's out too.

We're down to A and B. In general, the GMAT does not like unattached "that," "this," or "those" -- these words need some noun attached to them (this CAR, those PEOPLE, etc). A construction that IS allowed, and sometimes confuses people, is the use of "that of" or "those of" in a sentence. By adding the preposition "of," we imply the noun that was used earlier in the sentence. For example--

The door of my apartment is sturdier than the door of his apartment. Correct
The door of my apartment is sturdier than THAT OF his apartment. Correct, and means the exact same thing as the sentence immediate above
The door of my apartment is sturdier than that his apartment. INCORRECT

We need the "of" to complete this construction, and (B) doesn't have it. Eliminate.

That leaves us with (A). All of the modifiers are placed correctly and unambiguously, so that we know what each phrase refers to.
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Re: SC - GMAT Prep [#permalink] New post 06 Dec 2010, 00:51
parker wrote:
Lots of nasty modifiers here that require careful placement. So many of the phrases in these answer choices are the same--that's a clue that it will probably be the *position* of the phrases relative to each other that determines our answer.

The first split I chose to look at was between A/B ("Between 1990...) and C/D/E (The growth...). Neither is bad in and of itself, but seeing that "the growth" is the subject of the entire sentence for C/D/E is a cue for us to check the verb associated with that subject....sure enough, C and D use the present tense verb "exceeds" so we can cross them off-- we're in 2010, so the growth mentioned is *past* growth.

Also if the subject of the sentence in choice E is "the growth of the global economy between 1990 and 2000," then the second verb doesn't make sense when you replace the pronoun "it" with its antecedent: "the growth of the global economy between 1990 and 2000" exceeded what " the growth of the global economy between 1990 and 2000" did during an earlier time period? E's out too.

We're down to A and B. In general, the GMAT does not like unattached "that," "this," or "those" -- these words need some noun attached to them (this CAR, those PEOPLE, etc). A construction that IS allowed, and sometimes confuses people, is the use of "that of" or "those of" in a sentence. By adding the preposition "of," we imply the noun that was used earlier in the sentence. For example--

The door of my apartment is sturdier than the door of his apartment. Correct
The door of my apartment is sturdier than THAT OF his apartment. Correct, and means the exact same thing as the sentence immediate above
The door of my apartment is sturdier than that his apartment. INCORRECT

We need the "of" to complete this construction, and (B) doesn't have it. Eliminate.

That leaves us with (A). All of the modifiers are placed correctly and unambiguously, so that we know what each phrase refers to.

it is awesome explanation Parker.
I have eliminated B because i think ' from when ... to 1950" is unidiomatic. Is my POE right?
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Re: SC - GMAT Prep [#permalink] New post 06 Dec 2010, 20:54
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Good question-- it's not a construction that I've seen often and my gut says I don't like it, but I can't say that it's on my "definite no" list; I always hesitate to put something on that list unless I've seen it explicitly pointed out in official materials (also, I try to use idiom as the absolute last criteria for elimination).

But let's open it up to the group--has anyone else come across this in an OG problem or want to weigh in?
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Re: SC - GMAT Prep [#permalink] New post 04 Jan 2011, 00:55
parker wrote:
Good question-- it's not a construction that I've seen often and my gut says I don't like it, but I can't say that it's on my "definite no" list; I always hesitate to put something on that list unless I've seen it explicitly pointed out in official materials (also, I try to use idiom as the absolute last criteria for elimination).

But let's open it up to the group--has anyone else come across this in an OG problem or want to weigh in?


thanks Parker, i am not a native speaker and i wasted about 1 year to learn the lesson (on sc) you are recommending. Now my first approach to most sc problems is to consider its meaning first.
Comming back the sentence here, is "growth/economy + exceed" wierd in meaning? Plz kindly elaborate on this matter to help me understand deeply. i appreciate your all helps and willing to give kudos to all rational elucidations. :P
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Re: SC - GMAT Prep [#permalink] New post 16 Jan 2011, 10:14
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"Exceeded" is typically used to compare something to a threshold value ("exceeded my budget," "exceeded expectations," etc). But while it doesn't strike me as a common construction, it's not on my concrete no-no list and I always hesitate to make first-round eliminations based on idioms that are not on that list. In this case, you don't need to because of the other errors present. It's always safer to save idiom choices for the last round, unless you are 100% sure based on past OG questions that the idiom is incorrect.
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Last edited by parker on 26 Jan 2011, 01:28, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: SC - GMAT Prep [#permalink] New post 17 Jan 2011, 00:35
parker wrote:
"Exceeded" is typically used to compare something to a threshold value ("exceeded my budget," "exceeded expectations," etc). But while it doesn't strike me as a common construction-- again, it's not on my concrete no-no list and I always hesitate to make first-round eliminations based on idioms that are not on that list. In this case, you don't need to because of the other errors present. It's always safer to save idiom choices for the last round, unless you are 100% sure based on past OG questions the idiom is incorrect.

thank you Parker for correcting me.
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Re: SC - GMAT Prep   [#permalink] 17 Jan 2011, 00:35
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