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seeming Vs Seemingly

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seeming Vs Seemingly [#permalink] New post 23 Dec 2004, 20:28
Hi everybody!

It appears illogical to some people that West Germany, which bans such seeming lesser evils as lawn-mowing on Sundays, still has some 4,000 miles of highway with no speed limit.
(A) which bans such seeming lesser evils as
(B) which bans such seemingly lesser evils as
(C) which is banning such seeming lesser evils like
(D) banning such evils that seem lesser, for example
(E) banning such seeming lesser evils like

My question is here about KNOWING the difference between "seeming" & "seemingly"
If you guys want you can refer to OG SC #195, which has something to do with the same concept

I know that one is adj and the other adverb.

But I am confused with the usage so kindly shed some light on it.

ANS is not what is expected. I know 99% of the members will figure the answer but kindly help ME/OTHERS in understanding the difference.

Thanks
Saurabh Malpani
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Dec 2004, 20:53
i believe B is OA because as is preffered over like while comparing the actions. like is used in comparing the nouns. seemingly, not seeming, is correct.
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Dec 2004, 21:41
MA may I know why seeming is wrong or seemingly is correct or IF vice a versa?
I wrote above that ANS is not Important, I want to understand the concept.

So kindly Explain you line of reasoning.

Saurabh Malpani
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Dec 2004, 05:31
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Let's start with the definition of an adverb from the Webster dictionnary: a word belonging to one of the major form classes in any of numerous languages, typically serving as a modifier of a verb, an adjective, another adverb, a preposition, a phrase, a clause, or a sentence, expressing some relation of manner or quality, place, time, degree, number, cause, opposition, affirmation, or denial, and in English also serving to connect and to express comment on clause content

As you can see, an adverb not only modifies a verb but also adjectives, among many other things. Going back to your sentence:
which bans such seeming lesser evils as

What is "seeming" modifying? "Lesser" or "evils"? Is it right to say the "seeming" evils or is it better the "seemingly lesser" evil in which case "seemingly" modifies "lesser", the adjective. In this case, it seems proper to say that "seemingly" should modify "lesser", not "evil" and this is why B also sounds better to the ear. I'll give you another example whereby you'll have to choose b/w an adjective or an adverb.

ie The beautiful/beautifully blue flower.

Is it the "flower" or the "blue" which is beautiful? In this case, "beautiful" should stay in its adjective form to modify "flower" because once again, logic says that we are not describing the "blue" as being beautiful but instead, the "flower"

Just to add that you can also add a conjunction b/w the two adj. or adverb and see if it works. If it does, then the two should have an adjective form or else, the former should have an adverbial form. Let's start with the original question:

which bans such seeming and lesser evils as
seeming evils --> wrong
and
lesser evils--> ok
Since it is illogical to say seeming evils, seeming is meant to be an adverb modifying "lesser" and should read "seemingly"

From my example:
The beautiful flower--> ok
and
blue flower--> ok
Since both make sense with flower, both are then intended to modify noun flower and "beautfiful" stays as such in its adjective form
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Best Regards,

Paul

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 [#permalink] New post 24 Dec 2004, 09:22
nice example...
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Dec 2004, 12:06
Thanks Paul !! :-D
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Dec 2004, 15:33
Thanks Paul!

I have an Idea now I will dig into the concept and come back with other question. :-D

Thanks
Saurabh Malpani
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Dec 2004, 20:53
Paul wrote:
Let's start with the definition of an adverb from the Webster dictionnary: a word belonging to one of the major form classes in any of numerous languages, typically serving as a modifier of a verb, an adjective, another adverb, a preposition, a phrase, a clause, or a sentence, expressing some relation of manner or quality, place, time, degree, number, cause, opposition, affirmation, or denial, and in English also serving to connect and to express comment on clause content

As you can see, an adverb not only modifies a verb but also adjectives, among many other things. Going back to your sentence:
which bans such seeming lesser evils as

What is "seeming" modifying? "Lesser" or "evils"? Is it right to say the "seeming" evils or is it better the "seemingly lesser" evil in which case "seemingly" modifies "lesser", the adjective. In this case, it seems proper to say that "seemingly" should modify "lesser", not "evil" and this is why B also sounds better to the ear. I'll give you another example whereby you'll have to choose b/w an adjective or an adverb.

ie The beautiful/beautifully blue flower.

Is it the "flower" or the "blue" which is beautiful? In this case, "beautiful" should stay in its adjective form to modify "flower" because once again, logic says that we are not describing the "blue" as being beautiful but instead, the "flower"

Just to add that you can also add a conjunction b/w the two adj. or adverb and see if it works. If it does, then the two should have an adjective form or else, the former should have an adverbial form. Let's start with the original question:

which bans such seeming and lesser evils as
seeming evils --> wrong
and
lesser evils--> ok
Since it is illogical to say seeming evils, seeming is meant to be an adverb modifying "lesser" and should read "seemingly"

From my example:
The beautiful flower--> ok
and
blue flower--> ok
Since both make sense with flower, both are then intended to modify noun flower and "beautfiful" stays as such in its adjective form



Thanks Paul for your detail analysis and valuable inputs.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Dec 2004, 20:11
Paul wrote:
Let's start with the definition of an adverb from the Webster dictionnary: a word belonging to one of the major form classes in any of numerous languages, typically serving as a modifier of a verb, an adjective, another adverb, a preposition, a phrase, a clause, or a sentence, expressing some relation of manner or quality, place, time, degree, number, cause, opposition, affirmation, or denial, and in English also serving to connect and to express comment on clause content

As you can see, an adverb not only modifies a verb but also adjectives, among many other things. Going back to your sentence:
which bans such seeming lesser evils as

What is "seeming" modifying? "Lesser" or "evils"? Is it right to say the "seeming" evils or is it better the "seemingly lesser" evil in which case "seemingly" modifies "lesser", the adjective. In this case, it seems proper to say that "seemingly" should modify "lesser", not "evil" and this is why B also sounds better to the ear. I'll give you another example whereby you'll have to choose b/w an adjective or an adverb.

ie The beautiful/beautifully blue flower.

Is it the "flower" or the "blue" which is beautiful? In this case, "beautiful" should stay in its adjective form to modify "flower" because once again, logic says that we are not describing the "blue" as being beautiful but instead, the "flower"

Just to add that you can also add a conjunction b/w the two adj. or adverb and see if it works. If it does, then the two should have an adjective form or else, the former should have an adverbial form. Let's start with the original question:

which bans such seeming and lesser evils as
seeming evils --> wrong
and
lesser evils--> ok
Since it is illogical to say seeming evils, seeming is meant to be an adverb modifying "lesser" and should read "seemingly"

From my example:
The beautiful flower--> ok
and
blue flower--> ok
Since both make sense with flower, both are then intended to modify noun flower and "beautfiful" stays as such in its adjective form


Great explanation. Just a quite note. Adverb modifies anything but a noun. A nice rule to remember
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Jun 2007, 01:15
Paul wrote:
Let's start with the definition of an adverb from the Webster dictionnary: a word belonging to one of the major form classes in any of numerous languages, typically serving as a modifier of a verb, an adjective, another adverb, a preposition, a phrase, a clause, or a sentence, expressing some relation of manner or quality, place, time, degree, number, cause, opposition, affirmation, or denial, and in English also serving to connect and to express comment on clause content

As you can see, an adverb not only modifies a verb but also adjectives, among many other things. Going back to your sentence:
which bans such seeming lesser evils as

What is "seeming" modifying? "Lesser" or "evils"? Is it right to say the "seeming" evils or is it better the "seemingly lesser" evil in which case "seemingly" modifies "lesser", the adjective. In this case, it seems proper to say that "seemingly" should modify "lesser", not "evil" and this is why B also sounds better to the ear. I'll give you another example whereby you'll have to choose b/w an adjective or an adverb.

ie The beautiful/beautifully blue flower.

Is it the "flower" or the "blue" which is beautiful? In this case, "beautiful" should stay in its adjective form to modify "flower" because once again, logic says that we are not describing the "blue" as being beautiful but instead, the "flower"

Just to add that you can also add a conjunction b/w the two adj. or adverb and see if it works. If it does, then the two should have an adjective form or else, the former should have an adverbial form. Let's start with the original question:

which bans such seeming and lesser evils as
seeming evils --> wrong
and
lesser evils--> ok
Since it is illogical to say seeming evils, seeming is meant to be an adverb modifying "lesser" and should read "seemingly"

From my example:
The beautiful flower--> ok
and
blue flower--> ok
Since both make sense with flower, both are then intended to modify noun flower and "beautfiful" stays as such in its adjective form


nice!

a quick rule of thumb, although there are exceptions (such as the beautiful blue flower example above), can be used on the GMAT

adverb + adjective + noun

where the adverb modifies the adjective and, in turn, the adjective modifies the noun. the adverb does not modify the noun.
  [#permalink] 17 Jun 2007, 01:15
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