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Set S consists of 5 consecutive integers and set T consists

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Set S consists of 5 consecutive integers and set T consists [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 07:58
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A
B
C
D
E

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Set S consists of 5 consecutive integers and set T consists of 7 consecutive integers. Is median of set S equal to the median of set T ?

1) Median of set S is 0
2) Sum of the numbers in S is equal to the sum of numbers in T

Haven't figured out the explanation for this yet..


'm' and 'r' are two numbers on the number line. What is the value of 'r'
1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0
2) 12 is halfway between m and r.

I got this wrong but later figured out where i went wrong. Want to see if i can get a better and faster way to solve this one.

Thanks folks.
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 08:07
i guess that the ans for the first one is B.

stat 1) -2,-1,0,1,2 and 2,3,4. here median are not same suppose from the first set, -2 and 2 were removed the median would be the same i.e if the other set was -1,0,1. insuff

stat2) the only way i can figure out that two sets having different no. of consecutive elemts have same sum, is if the median is zero. suff.
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 08:47
Set S consists of 5 consecutive integers and set T consists of 7 consecutive integers. Is median of set S equal to the median of set T ?

1) Median of set S is 0
2) Sum of the numbers in S is equal to the sum of numbers in T


1) is not sufficient

For 2) let S = {m-2,m-1,m,m+1,m+2} and T = {n-3,n-2,n-1,n,n+1,n+2,n+3}

sum of no.s in S = 5m
sum of no.s in T = 7n

5m = 7n works for m = 7 and n =5 and for m=n=0.

Not sufficient.

Take both 1) and 2).
1) says m = 0. Therefore n = 0.

Answer is C.
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 09:22
Good job!! eyunni
Great approach.

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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 09:30
bhushangiri wrote:
Haven't figured out the explanation for this yet..


'm' and 'r' are two numbers on the number line. What is the value of 'r'
1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0
2) 12 is halfway between m and r.

I got this wrong but later figured out where i went wrong. Want to see if i can get a better and faster way to solve this one.

Thanks folks.


Better way for this approach is draw a picture.

1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0

________m_____0__________r____
__r______m____ 0______________
not suffcient

2)
________m_____0____12__________r____
_______________0__m_________12__________r____
____________r___0___12__________m____

combined.

________m_____0____12__________r____
_______________0__m_________12__________r____

not suffcient

E

what is OA.

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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 09:42
x2suresh wrote:
bhushangiri wrote:
Haven't figured out the explanation for this yet..


'm' and 'r' are two numbers on the number line. What is the value of 'r'
1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0
2) 12 is halfway between m and r.

I got this wrong but later figured out where i went wrong. Want to see if i can get a better and faster way to solve this one.

Thanks folks.


Better way for this approach is draw a picture.

1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0

________m_____0__________r____
__r______m____ 0______________
not suffcient

2)
________m_____0____12__________r____
_______________0__m_________12__________r____
____________r___0___12__________m____

combined.

________m_____0____12__________r____
_______________0__m_________12__________r____

not suffcient

E

what is OA.


Ya.. this approach is better than the algebraic approach which got me wrong. thanx.
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 12:38
x2suresh wrote:
bhushangiri wrote:
Haven't figured out the explanation for this yet..


'm' and 'r' are two numbers on the number line. What is the value of 'r'
1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0
2) 12 is halfway between m and r.

I got this wrong but later figured out where i went wrong. Want to see if i can get a better and faster way to solve this one.

Thanks folks.


Better way for this approach is draw a picture.

1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0

________m_____0__________r____
__r______m____ 0______________
not suffcient

2)
________m_____0____12__________r____
_______________0__m_________12__________r____
____________r___0___12__________m____

combined.

________m_____0____12__________r____
_______________0__m_________12__________r____

not suffcient

E

what is OA.



I don't get the first drawing for the combined tacit. How can m be negative and 12 still be between m and r? is it if m is like -12 and r would be 36 then? thanks.
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 13:01
'm' and 'r' are two numbers on the number line. What is the value of 'r'
1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0
2) 12 is halfway between m and r.

I got this wrong but later figured out where i went wrong. Want to see if i can get a better and faster way to solve this one.

Thanks folks.[/quote]


I'm new here, but tackling this one I'm come up with both together are sufficient. I threw numbers in to solve the problem.

We know r = 3m

|-------m-------12--------3m
0

I plugged in a few numbers and found that if you plug in 6 for m, you get

|-----6------12------18
0

18 = 3 x 6, and 12 works as the midpoint. No other values will work here, so to me that answers the question. If I'm missing something- please let me know!
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 13:46
NickTW wrote:
'm' and 'r' are two numbers on the number line. What is the value of 'r'
1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0
2) 12 is halfway between m and r.

I got this wrong but later figured out where i went wrong. Want to see if i can get a better and faster way to solve this one.

Thanks folks.



I'm new here, but tackling this one I'm come up with both together are sufficient. I threw numbers in to solve the problem.

We know r = 3m

|-------m-------12--------3m
0

I plugged in a few numbers and found that if you plug in 6 for m, you get

|-----6------12------18
0

18 = 3 x 6, and 12 works as the midpoint. No other values will work here, so to me that answers the question. If I'm missing something- please let me know![/quote]


1) |r| = |3m|

Insuff

2) |m| + |r| / 2 = 12

Insuff ( -12 & 36 mid point is 12, 6 and 18 mid point is 12 )

Together

4 |m| =24 means m = +6 or -6

r= + 18 or -18

clearly (6,18) fits the bill.

(-6,18) mid point is 6; (-6, -18) mid point is -12. (6, -18) midpoint is -6

We can say r=18

is OA C??
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 13:47
OAs

Q1 - c
Q2 - e

Thanx for all the suggestions folks..
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 17:28
Set S consists of 5 consecutive integers and set T consists of 7 consecutive integers. Is median of set S equal to the median of set T ?

1) Median of set S is 0
2) Sum of the numbers in S is equal to the sum of numbers in T

Haven't figured out the explanation for this yet..

bhushangiri wrote:
'm' and 'r' are two numbers on the number line. What is the value of 'r'
1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0
2) 12 is halfway between m and r.

I got this wrong but later figured out where i went wrong. Want to see if i can get a better and faster way to solve this one.

Thanks folks.
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 17:30
Set S consists of 5 consecutive integers and set T consists of 7 consecutive integers. Is median of set S equal to the median of set T ?

1) Median of set S is 0
2) Sum of the numbers in S is equal to the sum of numbers in T

Haven't figured out the explanation for this yet..

bhushangiri wrote:
'm' and 'r' are two numbers on the number line. What is the value of 'r'
1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0
2) 12 is halfway between m and r.

I got this wrong but later figured out where i went wrong. Want to see if i can get a better and faster way to solve this one.

thanks folks.




is that the no. zero or the letter O ?
i considerd it as 0 and solved.
kindly clarify
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 17:46
IMO C.

1 ) Median of set S is 0 => does not say anything about T

2 ) Sum of the numbers in S is equal to the sum of numbers in T => infact this one is tempting..because we know that the mean and median for continous sequence is same.. so if X is the sum of the series, then median of S and T is X/5 and X/7 respectively,, so that means they are not equal,, but wait what if X=0
so, 2 is not sufficient.

Including 1 and 2 ; median of S = 0,, so X=0 and so median of T=0
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 18:03
For the second question : IMO E

1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0 => r=3m or r=-3m.. not sufficient
2) 12 is halfway between m and r = > 12-m=r-12 = > not suffient as we have only one expression for 2 varaibles.

conbined..
if r=3m , from 12-m=r-12 => 24=4m=> m=6 and r=18
if r=-3m, from 12-m=r-12 => 2m=-24=> m -12 and r= 36
so, we are not sure.
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 18:48
good method ssandeepan...
i was just thinking abt solving it algebraically,when i saw your post . good method and nicely posted.
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 18:52
bhushangiri wrote:
Set S consists of 5 consecutive integers and set T consists of 7 consecutive integers. Is median of set S equal to the median of set T ?

1) Median of set S is 0
2) Sum of the numbers in S is equal to the sum of numbers in T

Haven't figured out the explanation for this yet..


'm' and 'r' are two numbers on the number line. What is the value of 'r'
1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0
2) 12 is halfway between m and r.

I got this wrong but later figured out where i went wrong. Want to see if i can get a better and faster way to solve this one.

Thanks folks.


Q1) given : S{5 consec integers},T{7 consecutive integers}
Question: MEDs=MEDt ?

1) Median of set S is 0 ->its INSUFFI since 7 cosecutive integers can be anywhere ,MEDt canbe 0 if all integers are about 0 (0 as median) or they can be scattered somewhere else on the number line with different median.

2) Sum of the numbers in S is equal to the sum of numbers in T
-> sum of 5 consecutive numbers = sum of 7 consec numbers

say S={n-2,n-1,n,n+1,n+2}
T={p-3,p-2,p-1,p,p+1,p+2,p+3}

5n=7p => if n=p=0 then only true for n and p o be integers .
hence SUFFI mean =0 for both and hence equal.

IMO B

Q2)given :'m' and 'r' are two numbers on the number line.
question :r=?
(1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0 -> r and m can be on diffrent sides on the number line,r can be +ve or r can be -ve INSUFFICIENT ,again m can be any value (integer ,fraction etc).
2) 12 is halfway between m and r. =>again r ad m can be on same side of 0 or different side then different values of r.again m can be inteer ,fraction ,and r too can be .INSUFFI

(1) and (2) => is not SUFFI since both of them dont say about value of m whether integer or fraction and also no value of m ,hence for every value of m there can be a value for r even if 12 lies in between.INSUFFI

IMO E

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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 05 Sep 2008, 18:58
eyunni wrote:
Set S consists of 5 consecutive integers and set T consists of 7 consecutive integers. Is median of set S equal to the median of set T ?

1) Median of set S is 0
2) Sum of the numbers in S is equal to the sum of numbers in T


1) is not sufficient

For 2) let S = {m-2,m-1,m,m+1,m+2} and T = {n-3,n-2,n-1,n,n+1,n+2,n+3}

sum of no.s in S = 5m
sum of no.s in T = 7n

5m = 7n works for m = 7 and n =5 and for m=n=0.

Not sufficient.

Take both 1) and 2).
1) says m = 0. Therefore n = 0.

Answer is C.


Good one,i just missed on the values !!!

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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2008, 02:50
my answer is B

(1) is ins

(2) is sufficient-

the only way the sum of the 2 sets is equal - for both sets, the mean and the average equal zero ==> symmetry around zero with an odd number of consequtive integers

example:

-2,-1,0,1,2

or -3,-2,-1,0,1,2,3

so (2) is sufficient
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Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2008, 03:03
Set S consists of 5 consecutive integers and set T consists of 7 consecutive integers. Is median of set S equal to the median of set T ?

1) Median of set S is 0
2) Sum of the numbers in S is equal to the sum of numbers in T

s = x,x+1, x+2, x+3, x+4 ( median is x+2) , t = y, y+1, y+2, y+3, y+4, y+5, y+6 ( median = y+3)

is x+2 = y+3
from one

x = -2.........insuff

from 2

5x+10 = 7y+21 ie: 5x-7y = 11 , 7y must end either in 9 as units digit or 4 thus y = 7 or y = 2

5x-14 = 11, ie: x = 5 or 5x-49 = 11 ie x = 12

in either cases x+2 is not = y+3..........suff



Haven't figured out the explanation for this yet..


'm' and 'r' are two numbers on the number line. What is the value of 'r'
1) The distance between r and 0 is three times the distance between m and 0
2) 12 is halfway between m and r.

from 1

/r/ = 3/m/........insuff

from 2

/m-12/ = /r-12/........insuff

both ..........E

I got this wrong but later figured out where i went wrong. Want to see if i can get a better and faster way to solve this one.

Thanks folks.[/quote]
Re: Two GMAT prep DS questions   [#permalink] 19 Oct 2008, 03:03
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