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Small Time Undergrad

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Small Time Undergrad [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2007, 20:58
I just graduated from UVSC, which turns into Utah Valley University this year. I had great grades (Engish major=3.9, Business minor=4.0). The last five or six semesters I got a 4.0.

How do the top-tier b-schools look at this. Are all schools kind of created equal or do reviewers scoff. I am hoping to score a 745 to help dissuade any fear that may be lurking.

Please sound off.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2007, 21:27
The GMAT is scored in 10 point increments so a 745 is not possible.

All schools are not created equal. A degree from a brand name school can be a huge asset in the application process. With a near 4.0 GPA, you can get into a top school, but you'll need to offer some supporting evidence of your academic abilities. A high GMAT score would be one good way to do this.

The most competitive schools like to see evidence that applicants have faced fierce competition and made it to the top of the heap. People who gain admission to an ivy league college or land an ultra-competitive job at Google or as an investment banking analyst have this baked into their backgrounds. People who get a 4.0 at UVSC...unclear, so you'll have to prove your abilities in other ways.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 03:28
I went to a tiny school, fewer than a 1,000 students. I had a about a 3.4 GPA and a 740 GMAT, and applied to three M7 schools, and already got accepted to one. So it is possible to get in out of a no name school. A word of caution though about my tale, my undergrad was extremely unique, so that may have actually helped. The 740gmat probably proved that academically it wasn't a cake walk to get that 3.4 and that I could cut it in b-school.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 07:48
I'm perhaps in riverripper's boat - near 4.0 from a small, private, liberal arts school in the midwest. Quite happy with how things came out for me last year.

Here's what I say: no one factor is a 100% deal breaker. We all know about people with bad GMATs who get into (insert fancy school name here). The more positive data points you offer, the better your app will be, no matter who you are. And in my estimation, I would put having a bachelor's from (insert fancy undergrad school name here) lower on the list of data points. I would even contend that schools see undergrad institution as a point of diversity - one of my old professors at Tiny College used to be pals with an adcom at a semi-major b-school, and apparently she told him that she wishes they would get more small, liberal-artsy or state college applicants. There just doesn't seem to be much of a pipeline.

And who really cares anyway, as your alma mater is not something you can do anything about.

Next steps:

Do well on your GMAT.
Be thoughtful.
Write brilliant essays.
Get into school.

(And see Lepium's post on the phases of b-school for all the stress and disorganization that comes in between!)
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 08:09
When I tried to find alums of my school who have MBAs. Four people from the last 30 years who went to big name MBAs and no one who has graduated since 1990. There was a Cornell, Chicago GSB (one of my professors), Sloan (master of science in management or something), and an HBS. All have done extremely well, two are CEOs, one is a Managing Director at a bank, and the other is the engineering department head at my undergrad.

One advantage of not going to a big name school is you aren't competing against another dozen applicants from that school. I am sure at a top program there are tons of applicants from all the Ivy league school, while its nice having that institution on your application if you are at the bottom of the pile in that group its going to actually hurt you in my opinion.

Schools love diversity, heck lots ask why you are unique...turn your tiny no name school into a strength. Thats what I tried to do.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 08:42
riverripper wrote:
When I tried to find alums of my school who have MBAs. Four people from the last 30 years who went to big name MBAs and no one who has graduated since 1990. There was a Cornell, Chicago GSB (one of my professors), Sloan (master of science in management or something), and an HBS. All have done extremely well, two are CEOs, one is a Managing Director at a bank, and the other is the engineering department head at my undergrad.

One advantage of not going to a big name school is you aren't competing against another dozen applicants from that school. I am sure at a top program there are tons of applicants from all the Ivy league school, while its nice having that institution on your application if you are at the bottom of the pile in that group its going to actually hurt you in my opinion.

Schools love diversity, heck lots ask why you are unique...turn your tiny no name school into a strength. Thats what I tried to do.

what about those who went to giant public schools... there must be tons of applicants from each of these :(
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2007, 09:59
yeah, the big name school thing may be a double edged sword for me, since there are a LOT of applicants from those schools... I hope it's a pro instead of a con though...
  [#permalink] 29 Nov 2007, 09:59
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