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Some critics argue that an opera s stage directions are

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Some critics argue that an opera s stage directions are [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2010, 08:24
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Some critics argue that an opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music. Many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas, however, open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery. Clearly Mozart intended the music to echo the sounds occurring while stage directions are carried out. Hence, a change of scenery—the most basic and frequent stage direction—can be reflected in the music, which means that other operatic stage directions can be as well.

In the argument, the statement that many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery is offered in support of the claim that

(A) a change of scenery is the stage direction most frequently reflected in an opera’s music
(B) an opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music
(C) an opera’s music can have an effect on the opera’s stage directions
(D) a variety of stage directions can be reflected in an opera’s music
(E) the most frequent relation between an opera’s music and its stage directions is one of musical imitation of the sounds that occur when a direction is carried out

Q16
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2010, 08:31
RaviChandra wrote:
Q16)Some critics argue that an opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music. Many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas, however, open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery. Clearly Mozart intended the music to echo the sounds occurring while stage directions are carried out. Hence, a change of scenery—the most basic and frequent stage direction—can be reflected in the music, which means that other operatic stage directions can be as well.
In the argument, the statement that many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery is offered in support of the claim that
(A) a change of scenery is the stage direction most frequently reflected in an opera’s music
(B) an opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music
(C) an opera’s music can have an effect on the opera’s stage directions
(D) a variety of stage directions can be reflected in an opera’s music
(E) the most frequent relation between an opera’s music and its stage directions is one of musical imitation of the sounds that occur when a direction is carried out


I think the answer is D.
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2010, 09:31
RaviChandra wrote:
Q16)Some critics argue that an opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music. Many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas, however, open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery. Clearly Mozart intended the music to echo the sounds occurring while stage directions are carried out. Hence, a change of scenery—the most basic and frequent stage direction—can be reflected in the music, which means that other operatic stage directions can be as well.
In the argument, the statement that many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery is offered in support of the claim that
(A) a change of scenery is the stage direction most frequently reflected in an opera’s music
(B) an opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music
(C) an opera’s music can have an effect on the opera’s stage directions
(D) a variety of stage directions can be reflected in an opera’s music
(E) the most frequent relation between an opera’s music and its stage directions is one of musical imitation of the sounds that occur when a direction is carried out


since evidence is given, and we are asked to find this evidence supports to what, it means we need to find out the conclusion of the argument: conclusion of such arguments which start with some people argue/ think is mostly opposite to that( as author mostly contrast the situation ) so looking at the answer choice D fits into the bill..
IMO D, what's OA?
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2010, 10:09
IMO D
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2010, 12:54
16. E
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2010, 19:38
Hence, a change of scenery—the most basic and frequent stage direction—can be reflected in the music, which means that other operatic stage directions can be as well --- Conclusion.
many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery --Evidence.

My Ans is D.
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2010, 20:52
How do we eliminate B??
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 20 Apr 2010, 21:01
FedX wrote:
How do we eliminate B??

author's sole intention is to address the issue as mentioned in option B. first line of the argument forward this issue and after that author clarifies starting with keyword "however".
hope this will help.
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2010, 00:51
I vote for D.
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2010, 00:54
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RaviChandra wrote:
Q16)Some critics argue that an opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music. Many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas, however, open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery. Clearly Mozart intended the music to echo the sounds occurring while stage directions are carried out. Hence, a change of scenery—the most basic and frequent stage direction—can be reflected in the music, which means that other operatic stage directions can be as well.
In the argument, the statement that many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery is offered in support of the claim that
(A) a change of scenery is the stage direction most frequently reflected in an opera’s music
(B) an opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music
(C) an opera’s music can have an effect on the opera’s stage directions
(D) a variety of stage directions can be reflected in an opera’s music
(E) the most frequent relation between an opera’s music and its stage directions is one of musical imitation of the sounds that occur when a direction is carried out



IMO D

A : most frequently reflected is wrong . Author says it can be reflected ( not most frequently)
B: This is the premise which the author is opposing . the second sentence starts with "however " depicting that he refutes the claim
C : Effect is out of scope
E : Relation is not required as we need to strengthen the claim.
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2010, 22:01
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toughest of the lot u have got it till now.

Guessing its "D". Hope this is a 700+ question, else I have a long way to go.
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2010, 06:23
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Should be D.

RaviChandra wrote:
Q16)Some critics argue that an opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music. Many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas, however, open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery. Clearly Mozart intended the music to echo the sounds occurring while stage directions are carried out. Hence, a change of scenery—the most basic and frequent stage direction—can be reflected in the music, which means that other operatic stage directions can be as well.
In the argument, the statement that many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery is offered in support of the claim that
(A) a change of scenery is the stage direction most frequently reflected in an opera’s music >> so what? argument does not ask which is the most frequently reflected stage direction.
(B) an opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music >> too generic....notice the phrase "other operatic...", hence the argument does not talk about ALL directions
(C) an opera’s music can have an effect on the opera’s stage directions >> cause and effect reversal.
(D) a variety of stage directions can be reflected in an opera’s music >> bingo
(E) the most frequent relation between an opera’s music and its stage directions is one of musical imitation of the sounds that occur when a direction is carried out >> irrelevant
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2010, 07:33
OA is D good explanation guys
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2010, 03:08
yes agree with D .....we need an example that shows that a direction can be identified in the opera ...and D does that for us
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 04 May 2010, 19:18
D - Based on the most common stage direction being reflected in the music, we can say that the music can reflect many stage directions. Plus the other choices aren't too good.
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 05 May 2010, 05:16
I guessed "D"... and guessed right :)
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 05 May 2010, 06:16
My choice is D.

In the argument, the statement that many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery is offered in support of the claim that

We are looking for something that the supports the claim.

Answer B refutes the claim.

Answer D supports the claim.
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 05 May 2010, 12:35
The author is basically out to defend / back his claims in opposition of the position
held by critics. A pointer is the use of transitional word "however."
Author's view "that an opera's stage directions are reflected in its music" is clearly
highlighted in option D.
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 06 May 2010, 23:51
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Some critics argue that an opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music. Many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas, however, open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery. Clearly Mozart intended the music to echo the sounds occurring while stage directions are carried out. Hence, a change of scenery—the most basic and frequent stage direction—can be reflected in the music, which means that other operatic stage directions can be as well.

In the argument, the statement that many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery is offered in support of the claim that

(A) a change of scenery is the stage direction most frequently reflected in an opera’s music
(B) an opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music
(C) an opera’s music can have an effect on the opera’s stage directions
(D) a variety of stage directions can be reflected in an opera’s music
(E) the most frequent relation between an opera’s music and its stage directions is one of musical imitation of the sounds that occur when a direction is carried out

Answer is D

I took a simple approach. Concentrate on the keyword However in the second sentence. It reverses the flow of the argument. So I just reversed the first sentence "opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music." The nearest match to this was only D. B is out of question, its going against the argument. A is wrong as the music can be there still not affecting the direction. C sounds like music is a supplement which has variant effects sometime expressing change in direction and sometimes not.
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Re: Mozart’s opera [#permalink] New post 08 May 2010, 05:59
D
Easy :)

Let's look at the argument in this way:

Some critics argue that an opera’s stage directions are never reflected in its music. Many comic scenes in Mozart’s operas, however, open with violin phrases that sound like the squeaking of changing scenery. Clearly Mozart intended the music to echo the sounds occurring while stage directions are carried out. Hence, a change of scenery—the most basic and frequent stage direction—can be reflected in the music, which means that other operatic stage directions can be as well.

So , opera’s stage directions can be reflected in the music
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Re: Mozart’s opera   [#permalink] 08 May 2010, 05:59
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