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Some mistakes on articles from www.wired.com?

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Some mistakes on articles from www.wired.com? [#permalink] New post 10 May 2010, 10:03
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Hi all,

I find these two sentences on http://www.wired.com and I think these are incorrect:

1. If pain researchers would adopt this, we could get more accurate translations [of drug effectiveness] to humans.

As per Manhattan SC, in the IF clause, presence of Would/Could shows incorrect usage.

2. While Eckman didn’t do research on pain expressions, the mouse grimace scale beefs up his argument that facial expressions are not only ubiquitous across human cultures, but also all mammals.

In (2), I think the construction ...not only ubiquitous across human cultures, but also all mammals...is Incorrect.

Please comment.
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Re: Some mistakes on articles from www.wired.com? [#permalink] New post 10 May 2010, 10:53
ykaiim wrote:
Hi all,

I find these two sentences on http://www.wired.com and I think these are incorrect:

1. If pain researchers would adopt this, we could get more accurate translations [of drug effectiveness] to humans.

As per Manhattan SC, in the IF clause, presence of Would/Could shows incorrect usage.

2. While Eckman didn’t do research on pain expressions, the mouse grimace scale beefs up his argument that facial expressions are not only ubiquitous across human cultures, but also all mammals.

In (2), I think the construction ...not only ubiquitous across human cultures, but also all mammals...is Incorrect.

Please comment.


Yes, you see this kind of stuff all the time.
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Re: Some mistakes on articles from www.wired.com? [#permalink] New post 14 May 2010, 20:53
Nice examples. Should the correction be:

1. If pain researchers adopt this, we will/can get more accurate translations [of drug effectiveness] to humans.

2. While Eckman didn’t do research on pain expressions, the mouse grimace scale beefs up his argument that facial expressions are ubiquitous across not only human cultures, but also all mammals.
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Re: Some mistakes on articles from www.wired.com? [#permalink] New post 14 May 2010, 21:33
IMO:

1. If pain researchers adopt this, we will get more accurate translations [of drug effectiveness] to humans.

2. While Eckman didn’t do research on pain expressions, the mouse grimace scale beefs up his argument that facial expressions are ubiquitous not only across human cultures, but also across all mammals.


calvinhobbes wrote:
Nice examples. Should the correction be:

1. If pain researchers adopt this, we will/can get more accurate translations [of drug effectiveness] to humans.

2. While Eckman didn’t do research on pain expressions, the mouse grimace scale beefs up his argument that facial expressions are ubiquitous across not only human cultures, but also all mammals.

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Re: Some mistakes on articles from www.wired.com? [#permalink] New post 16 May 2010, 01:11
yup , the sentances at wired.com are nt correct , definately it is not always that these people follow the conventional grammer usuage.
Re: Some mistakes on articles from www.wired.com?   [#permalink] 16 May 2010, 01:11
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Some mistakes on articles from www.wired.com?

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