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Some musical works such as Motrevedi's embody a new

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Some musical works such as Motrevedi's embody a new [#permalink] New post 30 Jul 2006, 22:46
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C
D
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Some musical works such as Motrevedi's embody a new principle of organization and are of historical importance. But musicologists or listeners have hardly included them among, great music works. However, Mozart's "The mariiage of Fiagro", is certainly among the classics even though its innovations are limited to extending forms.

Which of the following can be inferred from the passage?

a) Creative artists fundamentally change the musical forms of thier predecessors in a highly inventive fashion

b) Music works that are important in the history are not considered of high aesthetic value.
c)Motrevedi manipulated established conventions of music in innovative ways
d) Musicians may create an illusion of having transcending existing forms
e) The forms that portray historical themes became successful productions.

the answer is shown in the book as B.
I disagree and see it as C
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Jul 2006, 23:04
Will go with B. But its a mess out there.

My explanation:

The author states that Motrevedi's music included some nifty inventions, hence is of historical significance. He further adds that though Mozart's piece did not have any innovative music, it is considered a classic.

What this basically tells us is that music need not be of high asthetic value to be of historical importance.

C cannot be clearly inferred from the passage. He created music that had new organization. We cannot say he changed the established conventions of music.
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Re: CR - can the generalized statements be the inference. e. [#permalink] New post 31 Jul 2006, 13:44
The question is flawed and none of the answers draw the correct logical conclusion. It would be a waste of time to address each of the answers, but I will try to show why 'B' does not make sense.

Answer B states that music works that are important in history are not considered of high aesthetic value. First of all, the answer is not gramatically correct (sorry, I've been reading too much SC). But even the logic is flawed. It might be correct to say that works that are historically important are not necessarily regarded for their high aesthetic value, but based on the statements made in the passage it is absolute inorrect to simply state that they do not have high aesthetic value.

The author simply gives one example of a work that has high aesthetic value, but is not historically important, and one example of a work that his historically important but not aesthetically valuable, but it is a logical flaw to suggest that this one example means that ALL works that are historically important do not have high aesthetic value. WRONG WRONG WRONG.

That's my take and I'm sticking to it.
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Re: CR - can the generalized statements be the inference. e. [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2006, 11:57
pelihu wrote:
The question is flawed and none of the answers draw the correct logical conclusion. It would be a waste of time to address each of the answers, but I will try to show why 'B' does not make sense.

Answer B states that music works that are important in history are not considered of high aesthetic value. First of all, the answer is not gramatically correct (sorry, I've been reading too much SC). But even the logic is flawed. It might be correct to say that works that are historically important are not necessarily regarded for their high aesthetic value, but based on the statements made in the passage it is absolute inorrect to simply state that they do not have high aesthetic value.

The author simply gives one example of a work that has high aesthetic value, but is not historically important, and one example of a work that his historically important but not aesthetically valuable, but it is a logical flaw to suggest that this one example means that ALL works that are historically important do not have high aesthetic value. WRONG WRONG WRONG.

That's my take and I'm sticking to it.


Agree with you more or less. B is definately out. I could give convincing arguments for C however.

What's the source/OE ?
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2006, 15:00
I agree, there is no clear answer here. B sounds too strong to be correct from the given argument
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 [#permalink] New post 07 Aug 2006, 23:39
sorry for replying so late as I was out of town. the source is Kaplan.
any way thanks for answering
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Aug 2006, 02:13
Inherently, (B) just seems to fit the profile. Agreed it isn`t a perfect answer, but based on the musiciologists premise, it`s the best of the lot.

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  [#permalink] 17 Aug 2006, 02:13
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