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Some philosophers of science claim that no serious

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Some philosophers of science claim that no serious [#permalink] New post 24 Jul 2004, 21:37
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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61% (02:32) correct 39% (01:42) wrong based on 16 sessions
Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory can be tested experimentally without taking for granted some other body of scientific beliefs, for we cannot interpret any experimental results without relying on such beliefs. If this is true, then which of the following conclusions seems most likely?

A) Any particular scientific theory can be consistently retained, even in the face of apparently incompatible evidence, if we are willing to give up certain other scientific beliefs.

B) Experimental evidence is really irrelevant to scientific theorizing.

C) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the testing of scientific theories than to their initial formulation.

D) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the initial formulation of scientific theories than to their testing.

E) The best scientific theories are those which are formulated in such a way as to be subject to conclusive experimental refutation.

Answers with explanations please.
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2004, 07:44
I think its B. My reasoning is that the philsophers ae essentially stating the caveats associated with experimental evidence of their theories. Meaning, they really dont believe its important to prove their theory.
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2004, 09:59
my FA is C (Please provide reasoning with your answers - STOP the spirit of this forum getting under threat!)

My reasons:
A) Any particular scientific theory can be consistently retained, even in the face of apparently incompatible evidence, if we are willing to give up certain other scientific beliefs.
<B> "taking for granted such scientific beliefs" could mean taking for granted a set of universally accepted beliefs - this option goes too far </B>

B) Experimental evidence is really irrelevant to scientific theorizing.
<B> Eliminate this option as evidence could be relavant to scientific theorizing which is based upon a set of established scientific beliefs</B>

C) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the testing of scientific theories than to their initial formulation.
<B> I like the use of the word "more" - very GMATish. Also, this option concisely puts the intended summary of the argument </B>

D) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the initial formulation of scientific theories than to their testing.
<B> completely negates whatever is stated in the argument</B>

E) The best scientific theories are those which are formulated in such a way as to be subject to conclusive experimental refutation.
<B> out of scope of the argument as the author is not trying to compare scientific theories</B>
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 [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2004, 20:06
sorry guys, the OA is A -

Choice A is the conclusion which follows most directly from the philosophical thesis. If an experimental result is in conflict with some theory or set of beliefs, by discarding those experimental observations, we can retain the theory. Choices B,C, D, are incorrect, because the passage does not address the issue of the relevance of experimentation. Choice E may be true, but does not follow from the argument presented in the passage.
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Some philosophers of science claim that no serious [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2004, 16:15
Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory can be tested experimentally without taking for granted some other body of scientific beliefs, for we cannot interpret any experimental results without relying on such beliefs.

If this is true, then which of the following conclusions seems most likely?

A) Any particular scientific theory can be consistently retained, even in the face of apparently incompatible evidence, if we are willing to give up certain other scientific beliefs.
B) Experimental evidence is really irrelevant to scientific theorizing.
C) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the testing of scientific theories than to their initial formulation.
D) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the initial formulation of scientific theories than to their testing.
E) The best scientific theories are those which are formulated in such a way as to be subject to conclusive experimental refutation.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2004, 16:32
According to the argument experiments serve no purpose if they are not interpreted according to some belief. But this does not prove that experiments are irrelavent.

I would go with (A) on this one.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2004, 16:54
I'd go with A
Scientific theories depend on beliefs rather than experimentation. Hence, give up some beliefs and you will get the theories you want.
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Oct 2004, 18:37
Agree with A. We can still retain the theory by not considering the experimental observations - IF the experiment has a conflict with some theory or set of beliefs.
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Oct 2004, 20:02
A yes. Looks like I have solved this one
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Oct 2004, 05:26
OA is A
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Some philosophers of science claim that no serious [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 20:03
Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory can be tested experimentally without taking for granted some other body of scientific beliefs, for we cannot interpret any experimental results without relying on such beliefs.

If this is true, then which of the following conclusions seems most likely?

A) Any particular scientific theory can be consistently retained, even in the face of apparently incompatible evidence, if we are willing to give up certain other scientific beliefs.

B) Experimental evidence is really irrelevant to scientific theorizing.

C) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the testing of scientific theories than to their initial formulation.

D) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the initial formulation of scientific theories than to their testing.

E) The best scientific theories are those which are formulated in such a way as to be subject to conclusive experimental refutation.

please explain
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 21:11
u2lover, this was brutal.

I choose D here.
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2006, 22:05
:saw :saw :saw :saw :saw :saw

I can't understand what A is trying to say???? But I rejected others using POE.

I go with A. Will explain, if correct.
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2006, 11:45
first of all, ps_dahiya, that is pretty nasty...and wrong...ahhahaaa

from the passage, I am understanding it as scientific theory can not be tested without some other scientific belief (may be some foundation of science,..ie gravety, atoms...) and that we are not able to interpret them correctly if some of the foundations are not applied.

A. for me, A is restating the passage in a shorter way. Will hold on to it and see if there is something better.

B. irrelevant? passage states that they are relevant...

C and D are comparing "Experimental evidence, testing of scientific theory, and initial formulation"

E. Passage does not talk the "best," more like "no serious scientific theory "

Final answer A
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2006, 18:42
The paragraph implies that to test the theory, you need to take some scientific beliefs for granted. This means that these scientific beliefs actually form the basis of the formulation of the theory. So, either A or D.
D looks more promising as A talks about giving up other scientific beliefs.
so my answer is D.




Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory can be tested experimentally without taking for granted some other body of scientific beliefs, for we cannot interpret any experimental results without relying on such beliefs.

If this is true, then which of the following conclusions seems most likely?

A) Any particular scientific theory can be consistently retained, even in the face of apparently incompatible evidence, if we are willing to give up certain other scientific beliefs.

B) Experimental evidence is really irrelevant to scientific theorizing.

C) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the testing of scientific theories than to their initial formulation.

D) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the initial formulation of scientific theories than to their testing.

E) The best scientific theories are those which are formulated in such a way as to be subject to conclusive experimental refutation.

please explain
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Re: CR: Philosophers of science [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2006, 22:47
Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory can be tested experimentally without taking for granted some other body of scientific beliefs, for we cannot interpret any experimental results without relying on such beliefs.

If this is true, then which of the following conclusions seems most likely?

A) Any particular scientific theory can be consistently retained, even in the face of apparently incompatible evidence, if we are willing to give up certain other scientific beliefs. conclusion rely on experimental result out

B) Experimental evidence is really irrelevant to scientific theorizing. passage does not says that ..look first sentence

C) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the testing of scientific theories than to their initial formulation. out we are trying to link old scientific beliefs and experiments....
D) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the initial formulation of scientific theories than to their testing. seems the one

E) The best scientific theories are those which are formulated in such a way as to be subject to conclusive experimental refutation.
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2006, 23:05
I find C to be more appropriate.
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2006, 23:14
Spent four minutes on this one and still feel confused.

Using a little reverse psychology, the question writer seems to be testing the difference between C and D because of their similiar nature.

Only (D) relates to the passage as written.

4:14
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Jul 2006, 19:02
I picked C :oops:

OA is A

dahiya, acfuture nice job!!! i really thought this one was tough especially with time constraint

OE:
Choice A is the conclusion which follows most directly from the philosophical thesis. If an experimental result is in conflict with some theory or set of beliefs, by discarding those experimental observations, we can retain the theory.
Choices B,C, D, are incorrect, because the passage does not address the issue of the relevance of experimentation.
Choice E may be true, but does not follow from the argument presented in the passage.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2006, 06:38
A.
A bit of luck and a bit of analysis.
  [#permalink] 19 Jul 2006, 06:38
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