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Some religious traditions have opposed the representation of

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Some religious traditions have opposed the representation of [#permalink]

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New post 21 Dec 2003, 00:03
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Some religious traditions have opposed the representation of the human form in religious art. In particular, the representation of divine personages with human characteristics is seen as demeaning to those who do not share the gender, racial, ethnic, age or other human characteristics portrayed in the representations of divine personages.
Which of the following, if true, would constitute a logical challenge to the validity of these concerns?

A) Religious traditions are emotional and not logical.

B) Religious art without the human form is meaningless.

C) Research has failed to find anyone who shows evidence of being demeaned by representation of divine personages.

D) Most religions do not oppose the representation of the human form.

E) All people are equal in the eyes of God.
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New post 21 Dec 2003, 01:18
agree with E. It perfectly weakens the agrument.
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Re: CR: religious traditions [#permalink]

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New post 21 Dec 2003, 07:40
mbamantra wrote:
Some religious traditions have opposed the representation of the human form in religious art. In particular, the representation of divine personages with human characteristics is seen as demeaning to those who do not share the gender, racial, ethnic, age or other human characteristics portrayed in the representations of divine personages.
Which of the following, if true, would constitute a logical challenge to the validity of these concerns?

A) Religious traditions are emotional and not logical.

B) Religious art without the human form is meaningless.

C) Research has failed to find anyone who shows evidence of being demeaned by representation of divine personages.

D) Most religions do not oppose the representation of the human form.

E) All people are equal in the eyes of God.


I think A.

E does not give a reason why the representation of the human form in religious art should not be seen as demeaning.
In fact, if all people are equal in the eyes of God, then representation in human form should be seen as demeaning.
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New post 21 Dec 2003, 07:56
C

A Let them be emotional and illogical .. who cares? that is not the point raised in the argument.
B - be it meaningless or meaningful, the religious traditions will still oppose
D - 'representation of human form' in what??
E - equal or not equal in the eyes of God ... who cares? (meaning in the context of the argument). God does not come into picture and is out of scope

C - is not very strong but I feel is best among the choices. Not strong because even if the people show no evidence they may still be feeling so. Also no details about the research are given here ... o wait! I think that is an AWA point not a CR point!! he he ....
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New post 21 Dec 2003, 12:33
I feel B will challege the validity than the other options.
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New post 21 Dec 2003, 15:09
Only D is left out...com'n someone go for D... :wink:
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C is more crisp [#permalink]

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New post 21 Dec 2003, 20:58
Ans - C

C attacks the main argument in the stem. During practice using Kaplan, I came to conclusion that the correct ans must directly attack the premise in the statement. This is a very good example of the confusion put in form of out of scope choices

Eg consider B. This choice is so logically linked to the stem. But this choice broadens the scope of argument. C on the other hand attacks what is put forth as the stem. Many a times it is a close paraphrase of the stem itself. So if the basic concern of being demeaning is eliminated, the argument looses it validity. :kill

That is how I analyzed the question. Please feel free to comment on it.
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New post 22 Dec 2003, 01:09
Kaplan also says that choices should be in the scope of the original argument. What if researchers FAILED to find , i mean though evidence exists but they FAILED to find. if i go by Kaplan's methodology choice C is out of scope.

By the way official ans is C and this question is from 8000score.
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New post 16 Nov 2013, 22:04
Clearly C is the only answer that logically weakens the argument. The rest are either out of scope or illogical.
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Re: Some religious traditions have opposed the representation of [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2016, 02:54
mbamantra wrote:
Some religious traditions have opposed the representation of the human form in religious art. In particular, the representation of divine personages with human characteristics is seen as demeaning to those who do not share the gender, racial, ethnic, age or other human characteristics portrayed in the representations of divine personages.
Which of the following, if true, would constitute a logical challenge to the validity of these concerns?

A) Religious traditions are emotional and not logical.

B) Religious art without the human form is meaningless.

C) Research has failed to find anyone who shows evidence of being demeaned by representation of divine personages.

D) Most religions do not oppose the representation of the human form.

E) All people are equal in the eyes of God.



Stem : Representation of divine art in human form is demeaning to those who do not share particular characteristics.

But what if there is nobody who actually feels bad... this breaks the entire argument. You are saying A because of B. But if B is not proven to exist, can A be true?

C attacks this logic.

C.
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Re: Some religious traditions have opposed the representation of   [#permalink] 02 Jun 2016, 02:54
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