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Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp

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Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp [#permalink] New post 15 Apr 2006, 06:46
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Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp increases in the population of snow geese, which breed in the Arctic and are displacing birds of less vigorous species. Although snow geese are a popular quarry for hunters in the southern regions where they winter, the hunting season ends if and when hunting has reduced the population by five percent, according to official estimates. Clearly, dropping this restriction would allow the other species to recover.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the argument?

(A) Hunting limits for snow geese were imposed many years ago in response to a sharp decline in the population of snow geese.
(B) It has been many years since the restriction led to the hunting season for snow geese being closed earlier than the scheduled date.
(C) The number of snow geese taken by hunters each year has grown every year for several years.
(D) As their population has increased, snow geese have recolonized wintering grounds that they had not used for several seasons.
(E) In the snow goose’s winter habitats, the goose faces no significant natural predation.
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Apr 2006, 09:01
Arguement:

Since the population of Snow geese has increased, dropping the restriction on the limit of % of snow geese allowed to hunt will reduce the population.

Assumption - Since the restriction is imposed only in the southern region, dropping the restriction in southern region will affect the population of snow geese.

Choice D negates this since the geese no longer spend their winter only in southern region.

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 [#permalink] New post 15 Apr 2006, 09:13
Agree with Vipin...

Should be D
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Re: CR arctic bird [#permalink] New post 15 Apr 2006, 09:28
antiant wrote:
Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp increase in the population of snow geese, which breed in the Arctic and are displacing birds of less vigorous species. Although snow geese are a popular quarry for hunters in the southern regions where they winter, the hunting season ends if and when hunting has reduces the population by five percent, according to official estimates. Clearly, dropping this restiction would allow the other species to recover.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the argument?

a) Hunting limits for snow geese were imposed many years ago in respose to a sharp decline in the population of snow geese.

b) It has been many years since the restriction lead to the hunting season for snow geese being closed earlier than the scheduled date.

c) The number of snow geese taken by hunters each year has grown every year for several years.

d) As their population has increased, snow geese have recolonized wintering grounds that they had not used for several seasons.

e) In the snow goose's winter habitats, the goose faces no significant natural predation.


Argument.
Increasing population of snow gees causing threatining to Some species of Arctic birds.
Current limit for hunting is 5%
Conclusion:- drop the restriction to recover the species.

To undermine we have some argument which tells that "droping the restriction" will not cause to recover the species. i.e If hunter can hunt more snow gees that is good to recover the species.

D is correct.
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Re: CR arctic bird [#permalink] New post 15 Apr 2006, 13:30
agree, D
gmat_crack wrote:
antiant wrote:
Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp increase in the population of snow geese, which breed in the Arctic and are displacing birds of less vigorous species. Although snow geese are a popular quarry for hunters in the southern regions where they winter, the hunting season ends if and when hunting has reduces the population by five percent, according to official estimates. Clearly, dropping this restiction would allow the other species to recover.

Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the argument?

a) Hunting limits for snow geese were imposed many years ago in respose to a sharp decline in the population of snow geese.

b) It has been many years since the restriction lead to the hunting season for snow geese being closed earlier than the scheduled date.

c) The number of snow geese taken by hunters each year has grown every year for several years.

d) As their population has increased, snow geese have recolonized wintering grounds that they had not used for several seasons.

e) In the snow goose's winter habitats, the goose faces no significant natural predation.


Argument.
Increasing population of snow gees causing threatining to Some species of Arctic birds.
Current limit for hunting is 5%
Conclusion:- drop the restriction to recover the species.

To undermine we have some argument which tells that "droping the restriction" will not cause to recover the species. i.e If hunter can hunt more snow gees that is good to recover the species.

D is correct.
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Apr 2006, 13:32
agrre with D
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the OA is B [#permalink] New post 15 Apr 2006, 16:47
I don't understand quite well why the OA is B. Anybody can explain?
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CR17-11 [#permalink] New post 15 Oct 2006, 23:52
Some species of Arctic birds are threatened by recent sharp increases in the population of snow geese, which breed in the Arctic and are displacing birds of less vigorous species. Although snow geese are a popular quarry for hunters in the southern regions where they winter, the hunting season ends if and when hunting has reduced the population by five percent, according to official estimates. Clearly, dropping this restriction would allow the other species to recover.



Which of the following, if true, most seriously undermines the argument?




A.Hunting limits for snow geese were imposed many years ago in response to a sharp decline in the population of snow geese.

B.It has been many years since the restriction led to the hunting season for snow geese being closed earlier than the scheduled date.

C.The number of snow geese taken by hunters each year has grown every year for several years.

D.As their population has increased, snow geese have recolonized wintering grounds that they had not used for several seasons.

E.In the snow goose’s winter habitats, the goose faces no significant natural predation.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Oct 2006, 00:00
i'm going for B. C looks like a trap to me...
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Oct 2006, 05:47
I would go with A.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Oct 2006, 08:07
B. Because it appears that no one is interested in killing the geese, so , lifting restrictions is not going to change the status quo.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Oct 2006, 17:25
Tough one. Chose B.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Oct 2006, 19:23
Will go with B too..
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 [#permalink] New post 17 Oct 2006, 17:14
tough. A for me.
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Re: CR17-11 [#permalink] New post 21 Oct 2006, 16:03
Do we have its OA and OE?
Thanks!
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Oct 2006, 19:18
except B, all other options seem to somehow support the decrease in population of geese
wud go for B
Wats OA??
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Oct 2006, 08:14
One more for B ..
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Oct 2006, 08:25
why not E
the restriction, ie the conclusion of the argument, no longer makes sense
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 [#permalink] New post 22 Oct 2006, 10:19
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None of the answer choices except C to some extent makes sense to me.

I believe in C because even when geese is being hunted more and more yet the threat to arctic bird seems to remain constant.. this undermines the argument that killing/removing more geese will reduce the threat to arctic birds
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Oct 2006, 04:17
the OA?
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  [#permalink] 23 Oct 2006, 04:17
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