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Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51]

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Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2011, 09:00
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Just finished the GMAT. Nailed it with a 750 overall - 43Q, 51V

I will post a more thorough debrief a little bit later after I've collected my thoughts. Was a little disappointed my Quant percentile wasn't a little closer to 80 (it is 64%ile), however with an overall of 750, there is no way it is worthwhile to retake. Just wanted to say thanks to GMAT Club and I look forward to going through the admissions process with you guys!
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2011, 16:37
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OK guys, after thinking about it, here is what I can offer up to you. Obviously it worked out pretty well for me, and I think if you give yourself a few weeks/month or two of practice, even nonnative speakers can get here.

Here is my general strategy:

Bottom Line Up Front: Everything hinges on your ability to conquer any SC question (except those that are truly brutal) in around 60 seconds max.

1. Attack SC questions quickly and efficiently, aim for no more than 60 seconds per question. Obviously you will have 2-3 per test that are real tricky and require 60-120 seconds to analyze, break down, and compare answer choices. Think about it - you will get 4 RC passages per test, each with 4 questions. Therefore you're left with 25 CR/SC questions. Assuming you get about 10 CR and 15 SC, you can make up close to 30 seconds per SC question. Assuming you have the 2-3 that require a full 90 or even 120 seconds, you will still be ahead of schedule by about 6 minutes. This is key. It all starts here.

2. Now that you are working with a full extra 5-6-7 minutes of head-scratching, nail-biting POE time, you can really dig into those tough CR and RC passages. Everyone swears by the MGMAT SC guide, but most fail to tout the MGMAT CR and RC guides! These are GOLDEN. You have GOT to use MGMAT CR and RC if you want to score high 90 percentiles on Verbal. A lot of people claim that the "Diagramming" and "Highlighting" Techniques for CR and RC are time consuming and not feasible on the real GMAT due to time constraints. Let me tell you right now: I diagrammed every single CR question and highlighted all four RC passages when I took the GMAT. How was I able to do this? Yes, I worked efficiently and quickly, but I also had those extra 5 or so minutes I had made up by knocking out SC questions in a timely manner. See how it is all related?

3. Early in my prep, I noticed trends in my verbal test-taking. I never had significant problems with SC, but often got tough CR or RC questions incorrect. I couldn't figure out why until I attempted diagramming and highlighting. As it turns out, I was taking TOO MUCH TIME ON SC, leaving me insufficient time to process the barrage of information thrown at you in an RC passage, or leaving me too rushed as I analyzed CR, which often led to careless errors. REMEMBER: for BOTH CR and RC, the key to ascertaining the correct answer is COMPREHENSION of the passage. The best way to do this is make "highlight" or "diagram" notes as you are reading! This way you are literally reading and writing it simultaneously, which maximizes your brain's ability to truly process the meaning behind the words. Yes, this is difficult to do with an average of 2 mins per question, but if you are ahead of pace with good SC skill, you will have more along the lines of 2:15-2:20 average for RC and CR. These extra seconds are CRUCIAL because they allow you the opportunity to really think about the information, and then seriously consider how it relates to what the question is really asking.

Bottom line - first establish your skill with SC. This will gently ease you into verbal in general. Become more familiar with subject-verb agreement, parallelism, and modifiers. These are the things the GMAT will beat you with the most. Once you are at the 700+ level, you will see questions with all three of these issues at fault within the prompt. Read the sentence over once, and cross off the first option as soon as you know it's wrong (or leave it if a possible correct answer). Then read through the other four choices and place them back in the original sentence, looking for those key elements of SV agreement, parallelism, and modifier placement. Obviously this is overly broad, but if you have read the MGMAT SC guide, you'll know what I'm talking about.

Hope this helps you out, guys. Sorry if I was rambling a little bit. I'm willing to answer any other questions you might have. Thanks and take care!
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 27 Jul 2011, 15:26
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roshpat wrote:
Congratulations!!! Awesome score!! A V51 is just a perfect verbal score. Thank you very much for the detailed debrief on your verbal strategies. I concur that a strong SC base can enable more time to spent on CR & RC.

Just had a quick question, for RC, how much notes did you actually take? Would you right down the gist of each sentence in each para passage as outlined in MGMAT or one line describing the entire para?

Thank you very much. Good luck with your applications!!


For RC - I will give you an example. As we say in the Airborne community of the United States Army, "STANDBY!"

I am going to pick a random RC passage and outline it like I would on any test. I will do this from scratch and time myself and then post how long it took me to completely read and highlight the passage. This is a VERY DIFFICULT PASSAGE!


A recent generation of historians of science, far from portraying accepted scientific views as objectively accurate reflections of a natural world, explain the acceptance of such views in terms of the ideological biases of certain influential scientists or the institutional and rhetorical power such scientists wield. As an example of ideological bias, it has been argued that Pasteur rejected the theory of spontaneous generation not because of experimental evidence but because he rejected the materialist ideology implicit in that doctrine. These historians seem to find allies in certain philosophers of science who argue that scientific views are not imposed by reality but are free inventions of creative minds, and that scientific claims are never more than brave conjectures, always subject to inevitable future falsification. While these philosophers of science themselves would not be likely to have much truck with the recent historians, it is an easy step from their views to the extremism of the historians.

While this rejection of the traditional belief that scientific views are objective reflections of the world may be fashionable, it is deeply implausible. We now know, for example, that water is made of hydrogen and oxygen and that parents each contribute one-half of their children's complement of genes. I do not believe any serious-minded and informed person can claim that these statements are not factual descriptions of the world or that they will inevitably be falsified.

However, science's accumulation of lasting truths about the world is not by any means a straightforward matter. We certainly need to get beyond the naive view that the truth will automatically reveal itself to any scientist who looks in the right direction; most often, in fact, a whole series of prior discoveries is needed to tease reality's truths from experiment arid observation. And the philosophers of science mentioned above are quite right to argue that new scientific ideas often correct old ones by indicating errors and imprecision (as. say. Newton's ideas did to Kepler's). Nor would I deny that there are interesting questions to be answered about the social processes in which scientific activity is embedded. The persuasive processes by which particular scientific groups establish their experimental results as authoritative are themselves social activities and can be rewardingly studied as such. Indeed, much of the new work in the history of science has been extremely revealing about the institutional interactions and rhetorical devices that help determine whose results achieve prominence.

But one can accept all this without accepting the thesis that natural reality never plays any part at all in determining what scientists believe. What the new historians ought to be showing us is how those doctrines that do in fact fit reality work their way through the complex social processes of scientific activity to eventually receive general scientific acceptance.



All told, it took me 2 minutes and 4 seconds to read and highlight this passage. Here are my verbatim highlights made on scratch paper. A brief legend: I separate notes on each paragraph with numbers, such as 1)

1) Rec. hist expln reflect of world --> sci ideol
ex: Pasture rej theory b/c ideology not evidnce
Philo of Sci agree w/hist

2) IMPLAUSIBLE (author's stance)

3) Need 2 combine ideas, accept parts of each

4) Hist shld provide own evidence


As you can see, my notes are very succinct, brief, and sometimes only a word or two per paragraph. The KEY is that even if you write only ONE WORD, it should be a summary of what you feel that paragraph (or sentence, thought, etc) communicates in relation to the author's opinion and the general flow of the passage. Remember that all of these passages are going to ask you the SAME general questions: "The author's attitude on X would best be described as", etc. Specific questions, got it, maybe make a note or two that will jog your memory back to a key spot in the paragraph. It is all about timeliness and efficiency, developing a pattern that makes your brain comfortable with any text, no matter how hostile it might seem when you first start internalizing the subject matter. Does this help?


EDIT:

Further info -
Remember what the intent behind highlighting is: You are not trying to rewrite the passage! Even if you could write that fast, it would actually probably have a negative impact. What you are doing is training your brain to keep this RC passage in your short-term (read: 4-5 minutes or less) memory for just long enough to answer 4 multiple choice questions. After that you can forget it forever! Develop a personal mechanism that works for you in which you have a type of EXTREME shorthand, such that certain trigger words or phrases will automatically jog your memory. Obviously this will only work with a decent amount of practice.
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 24 Aug 2011, 20:26
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ebonn101 wrote:
krishp84 wrote:
[b]Question - Do you recommend any time limit on every CR question similar to SC questions?[/


Short answer, try to stay under two minutes, but if you have extra time from SC, this is where you get to make it up!

Here's why I think keeping SC under 1 min is your target:
Of the three verbal topics, SC is the most like quant in the sense that it is governed by rules. If you devote enough time and practice to master the rules of SC, you WILL get faster at it. CR and RC are governed by logic and comprehensive ability, so that's why I recommend saving extra time for those, when you will need to go back and re read or re think through the logic of the passage to answer the question.


Thanks ebonn101 for your advice. I think everything you said makes perfect sense.

In my last test, I got ALL (12) 700-800 level SCs correct, i.e., 12/15 SCs correct (ones I got incorrect were last 3 600-700 level SCs, which I marked randomly due to lack of time and got them all wrong). But my average time on these SCs was 1 min 30 secs. I follow 3 step process - 1) understand the meaning, 2) analyse errors in the original sentences, 3) POE. I am trying to reduce this timing but when I try to speed up, my accuracy dips a little. My goal is to get ALL SCs correct in the final, so that I can afford to get few RCs/CRs wrong in-case I am running out of time. Do you have any advice for me that could bolster my SC timing, while keeping the accuracy the same?

I was getting better at RC, but I dedicated 2+ weeks on SC and, as a result, I lost my focus in RCs (and also in CR). I am trying to regain the focus. My strategy in RC is to read the entire passage while looking for different viewpoints, participants' arguments, structure of the passage, tone of the passage, and author's stand/point. BUT I take ~5 mins to read a long passage and ~3-4 mins to read a short passage line by line. I think these timings are killing me. I had to randomly mark 1 full RC in the end and got all wrong. In-fact, in my last test I marked last 7 questions randomly and got all wrong - that dropped my verbal %ile from ~90-95 to ~81 and killed me :(. I normally read 1st 2 sentences twice and note something, and then after each paragraph I note something - but the thing is even while solving questoins I take 1-2 mins on each question, which I believe is a lot of time. Do you have any suggestions on how can I modulate my RC strategy just enough to reduce the timing and also grasp more of the content?

Thanks. Appreciate man!
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2011, 09:42
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Wow - congratulations!
Fantastic Verbal Score! What do you attribute it to?
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2011, 05:30
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I am a native speaker, which obviously helps. What I would really recommend for anyone, native or nonnative speaker, is to spend lot of time reading well-written literature. If you have several months before your planned GMAT date, read a variety of books to become comfortable and familiar with verbal. I am a pretty active reader myself, and I found this to be very beneficial. Lots of people recommend Mark Twain. I'd also say try some other classics, such as To Kill a Mockingbird, Moby Dick, and others. For more modern reading, look at nonfiction authors like Stephen Ambrose - his books are very interesting and have a very vibrant and expressive writing style that will help you recognize changes in grammar.
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 26 Jul 2011, 06:27
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Yes, I'm an Army officer.
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 24 Aug 2011, 11:56
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krishp84 wrote:
Hi ebonn101 -
please elaborate on your base foundation for Verbal score -
How you improved your SC accuracy combined with speed ?
This will help us all.

RC -
Were you never feeling sleepy or weared out when reading some boring RCs ?
If so, how did you handle it ?
If not, what you would you have possibly done if faced with this situation ?

CR -
Any general inputs for improving the speed and accuracy in CR apart from diagramming ?
If diagramming, how best to diagram to ensure the least effort and maximum results ?

Your verbal score puts you in an enviable position to share some of these inputs with all of us.

bb-We can have Verbal Legends added along with GMATClub legends :D


Regarding SC - Make sure you're using the correct source material to study. I only did a few 1000 SC, mostly ones I randomly saw on this forum while I was taking a break at work. Focused on MGMAT SC and all of OG 12 plus Verbal Review 2nd Ed. Also all of GMAT prep's practice. Avoid excessively relying on other sources, such as Kaplan or Princeton Review. On more than one occasion I actually found incorrect OAs in both of their material. I think because Kaplan and Princeton Review don't have the same high standards as MGMAT (they tend to be more about quantity than quality, in my opinion), this is reflected in their source material. It isnt ALL bad, but it's less realistic compared to the real GMAT verbal.

Regarding RC - I never found myself getting bored or zoning out on the RC's but that did happen to me on practice tests sometimes. I found that for me, it tended to happen when I mentally got in a slump and knew I had answered a couple of questions incorrectly. However during the times when I was feeling on a roll, I somehow was more motivated to pay close attention during RC. During the real GMAT I felt like I was annhilating every question in verbal, so I just kept up the momentum. I think the best thing to do to remain focused is just give yourself enough time. Do this by keeping ahead on your SCs and finishing each in less than 1 min if possible. Then you know you're going to have enough time for RC and can slow down and comprehend the passage. That's really the key with RC, simply highlight the text and then carefully read the questions and ask yourself what specifically it wants you to answer.

***To emphasize the importance of my advice about RC, I will just tell you that there were 3-4 RC questions on my actual GMAT that I found myself having to spend 3+ minutes analyzing. Were I sticking to the 2 min per CR/RC, 90 sec per SC rule, this wouldn't have been possible and I'd have had to guess and move on. If you want a verbal score in the mid-40s or higher, you NEED to give yourself some buffer time, because the hardest questions will sometimes require additional time that you might not otherwise have.***

Regarding CR - Best advice I can give you is just practice. Get comfortable with reading quickly while writing simultaneously. This by nature will increase your "comprehension" skill and allow you to subconsciously grasp what the passage is implying and what it is not, giving you the ability to almost immediately eliminate questions that are "beyond the scope" or obviously irrelevant. After that, you're usually left with 2-3 possible answers and then its just a matter of consulting your diagram and maybe going back and re-reading the question.

Hope this helped you out guys! I'm always willing to help and you can PM me or continue to use this thread to ask further questions or advice. I'm sure JoelCairo would be willing to pitch in as well. And I think I've seen one other V51 lurking around on this forum somewhere, so his/her advice is appreciated as well.
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 24 Aug 2011, 19:57
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krishp84 wrote:
[b]Question - Do you recommend any time limit on every CR question similar to SC questions?[/


Short answer, try to stay under two minutes, but if you have extra time from SC, this is where you get to make it up!

Here's why I think keeping SC under 1 min is your target:
Of the three verbal topics, SC is the most like quant in the sense that it is governed by rules. If you devote enough time and practice to master the rules of SC, you WILL get faster at it. CR and RC are governed by logic and comprehensive ability, so that's why I recommend saving extra time for those, when you will need to go back and re read or re think through the logic of the passage to answer the question.
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 29 Aug 2011, 06:32
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abhicoolmax wrote:
ebonn101 wrote:
krishp84 wrote:
[b]Question - Do you recommend any time limit on every CR question similar to SC questions?[/


Short answer, try to stay under two minutes, but if you have extra time from SC, this is where you get to make it up!

Here's why I think keeping SC under 1 min is your target:
Of the three verbal topics, SC is the most like quant in the sense that it is governed by rules. If you devote enough time and practice to master the rules of SC, you WILL get faster at it. CR and RC are governed by logic and comprehensive ability, so that's why I recommend saving extra time for those, when you will need to go back and re read or re think through the logic of the passage to answer the question.


Thanks ebonn101 for your advice. I think everything you said makes perfect sense.

In my last test, I got ALL (12) 700-800 level SCs correct, i.e., 12/15 SCs correct (ones I got incorrect were last 3 600-700 level SCs, which I marked randomly due to lack of time and got them all wrong). But my average time on these SCs was 1 min 30 secs. I follow 3 step process - 1) understand the meaning, 2) analyse errors in the original sentences, 3) POE. I am trying to reduce this timing but when I try to speed up, my accuracy dips a little. My goal is to get ALL SCs correct in the final, so that I can afford to get few RCs/CRs wrong in-case I am running out of time. Do you have any advice for me that could bolster my SC timing, while keeping the accuracy the same?

I was getting better at RC, but I dedicated 2+ weeks on SC and, as a result, I lost my focus in RCs (and also in CR). I am trying to regain the focus. My strategy in RC is to read the entire passage while looking for different viewpoints, participants' arguments, structure of the passage, tone of the passage, and author's stand/point. BUT I take ~5 mins to read a long passage and ~3-4 mins to read a short passage line by line. I think these timings are killing me. I had to randomly mark 1 full RC in the end and got all wrong. In-fact, in my last test I marked last 7 questions randomly and got all wrong - that dropped my verbal %ile from ~90-95 to ~81 and killed me :(. I normally read 1st 2 sentences twice and note something, and then after each paragraph I note something - but the thing is even while solving questoins I take 1-2 mins on each question, which I believe is a lot of time. Do you have any suggestions on how can I modulate my RC strategy just enough to reduce the timing and also grasp more of the content?

Thanks. Appreciate man!


Given the issue you seem to be struggling with in RC, perhaps consider (especially for long passages, which you will likely see 1-2 out of 4) focusing on transitions and conclusions within the passage when conducting your first read-through. When you start encountering long and technically worded lists (which often happens during the science and business-heavy passages), skim through those lightly. If a specifc question references those lists, you will go back and re-read it anyways. And definitely don't waste time highlighting the contents of a list. A simply bullet point to jog your memory is sufficient.

This strategy may save you a minute or so depending on the length of the passage. If you can get to a point where you can consume a large passage in about 3 minutes and then spend 1-1.5 min analyzing and answering each of the responses, you will probably be right on track. But like I said in my previous examples, there was a passage on my GMAT that I spent a LOT of time on because it was extremely difficult, and the reason I was able to do that is because I'd made up extra time on SC.
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 04 Sep 2011, 11:47
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This is perfect! I plan on trying to bump up my verbal score in my GMAT retake to try and reach a target of 730-750. I had a pretty solid Quant the first time around.
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 21 Feb 2012, 12:59
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Great verbal score!!! From an indian army officer to a US army officer---- RESPECTS!!!

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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 25 Feb 2012, 10:18
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Hey ebonn. You are truly a verbal baller.
I just want to echo a few of your points here because I think they're spot-on. When others have asked me my tips on how I've managed a great verbal score, I respond to the tune of "most of it is natural". But that's not right... as you've articulated perfectly below (hence the difference between my 44 and your 51 :-D )

ebonn101 wrote:
What I would really recommend for anyone, native or nonnative speaker, is to spend lot of time reading well-written literature. If you have several months before your planned GMAT date, read a variety of books to become comfortable and familiar with verbal. I am a pretty active reader myself, and I found this to be very beneficial. Lots of people recommend Mark Twain. I'd also say try some other classics, such as To Kill a Mockingbird, Moby Dick, and others. For more modern reading, look at nonfiction authors like Stephen Ambrose - his books are very interesting and have a very vibrant and expressive writing style that will help you recognize changes in grammar.

Let me quantify this thought a little more:
I've noticed a trend GMAT Club and some of the other GMAT forums. A lot of individuals who are having a harder time with verbal but seem to be completely good to go on quant often post questions and solicitations for advice on how to improve Verbal score. Often, with these individuals, you will look at their posted test scores and they will look something like this (this is an example I am just making up):

GMAT Prep 1 710 Q50, V33
MGMAT 1 690 Q51, V30
MGMAT 2 720 Q50, V34
GMAT Prep 2 720 Q51, V35

For people like this, you clearly have a very firm and solid grasp of the quantitative skills required for the test. I was the opposite, I have always been comfortable with verbal, but math was a bit more of a struggle for me. I got to an acceptable level, in fact I would even say I underperformed on the actual GMAT in quant. Were it not for my perfect verbal score, I probably would have considered retaking.

But for those of you lucky individuals, whether you are an Indian IT Male, Finance guy/gal, or belong to another demographic that typically performs well in quant, I cannot recommend enough that you simply devote more of your free time to reading English lit, both fiction and nonfiction. If your test is tomorrow or next week - ok, got it, you might not be able to use this technique to raise your score by a significant amount. But if you have a few months, I'd recommend perhaps easing back on your goal to do every question in 1000 SC or all of RC99. Obviously you need these tools to hone and refine your proficiency. If you spend all your time and energy on endless repetition of CR/RC/SC questions, sure your score will probably improve, but you will likely reach a plateau at some point that cannot be broken without a more refined and thorough grasp of the mechanics of the English language. Put another way, you may be "missing the forest for the trees."


To emphasize:
Spending a lot of time with well written English literature will increase your "natural floor" for verbal scoring.
I would venture that most of us who are "naturally" strong verbal performers are also serious readers. You develop "a feel" for correct sentence structure and effective expression through a lot of exposure to a well-written prose on many topics in a variety of styles. Instead of cross-referencing a passage or sentence against a litany of rules, your brain cues you into which one feels/sounds best. I'd suggest that reading a well-written novel every two weeks has about as much impact (over a several month window) as doing hundreds upon hundreds of practice problems, and it's "stickier".

Plan your attack
For myself, I did not spend more than about 5 hours preparing for GMAT verbal because I knew that my "floor" was in the mid 40s - which was high enough for me - and that the ROI for quant study time was far far higher. Ebonn describes that he spent the majority of his study time on quant because he recognized that his verbal "floor" was already extremely high. If you're the opposite - a quant baller and a verbal struggler - then please put down the fractions and pick up your novel. It's okay to say "I'm strong enough in this section" and move on.

Improving verbal abilities is less linear than improving quant mechanics
I believe that many who are naturally stronger in quant take the same practice-makes-perfect approach to improving their verbal abilities, when in fact verbal is a much less exact science than quant. Ask any nonnative speaker - English is a highly irregular language. Memorizing the rules is a far less effective path to mastery than simply immersing oneself in quality written literature. If I were developing a study plan and had more than about 12 weeks, I would devote about half of my time to reading and the other half to question-specific study.

Again, congrats on your stellar score and thanks for taking the time to help others improve!

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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2011, 09:13
omg!!!!!!omg!!!!!! verbal 51!!!!!!!!!!! you definitely need to retake the gmat with one months preparation. Will bet my savings that you will crack the 48+ in Q and also the magical 800..go for it!!!! and give some mortal souls like me some happiness that there are guys out there to thrash this monster by name GMAT!!! :)
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2011, 09:17
Haha, nah brother - it's not worth it at this point. Although I think I might be able to get to 46-47 in Quant, it's hard to reconcile that with my perfect verbal score. As good as I am with verbal, I don't know if a repeat 51 performance is likely. I'd like to tuck away a solid 780 just to say I did, but I think at this point my time is better spent on researching schools and on essays.
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2011, 09:35
ebonn101 wrote:
Haha, nah brother - it's not worth it at this point. Although I think I might be able to get to 46-47 in Quant, it's hard to reconcile that with my perfect verbal score. As good as I am with verbal, I don't know if a repeat 51 performance is likely. I'd like to tuck away a solid 780 just to say I did, but I think at this point my time is better spent on researching schools and on essays.



yea definitely agree with you. Congratulations on your score!! a 51 on verbal is incredible. I will eagerly await your debrief you handsome man you :p
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2011, 10:03
bb wrote:
Wow - congratulations!
Fantastic Verbal Score! What do you attribute it to?


I'll elaborate on this more later, but for now let me just emphasize how realistic GMAT PREP verbal is. MGMAT is probably second best, and Princeton Review is just OK. My verbal scores on my last two GMAT Prep tests were 48 (1 incorrect) and 41 (8 incorrect). The closest thing you'll find to real GMAT verbal is OG and GMAT Prep - hence the necessity to use these sources above all others.

I knew I hadn't had the greatest day in Quant - it started off badly as I'm 99% sure I got the first question wrong - but just chugged through it. After quant I knew I would have to step up and make up for it in verbal. Once I got to verbal it was like a veil was lifted or something. There was literally not a single question out of 41 where I had any doubt at all what the answer was. I didn't blaze through the section - pretty sure I had about 5 minutes to spare at the end, but I was never in one of those "well this could go one way or the other" situations. I don't know exactly how the scoring breakdowns work - but I am pretty convinced I hit a solid 41/41 in verbal.
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2011, 17:03
Wow, congratulations!

Thank you for these posts!
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2011, 18:08
Solid score, 51V is unreal!
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51] [#permalink] New post 25 Jul 2011, 19:25
Ridunculous!!!! I thought I was cool for hitting a V45 on my last MGMAT test. The funny thing is, I got 11 wrong! Congratulations!
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Re: Sometimes Quant can't get you there [750 Q43, V51]   [#permalink] 25 Jul 2011, 19:25
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