Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 29 Jul 2014, 08:49

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Sound can travel through water for enormous

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: Retaking next month
Affiliations: None
Joined: 05 Mar 2011
Posts: 229
Location: India
Concentration: Marketing, Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 570 Q42 V27
GPA: 3.01
WE: Sales (Manufacturing)
Followers: 4

Kudos [?]: 20 [0], given: 32

Re: Sound [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2011, 00:23
+1 for C. Though 'its' is an ambiguous pronoun in C
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 30 Jun 2011
Posts: 275
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 20 [0], given: 20

Reviews Badge
Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 19 Apr 2012, 03:48
In C, dissipating is present participle. Can someone explain how such usage is correct.
Expert Post
2 KUDOS received
Retired Moderator
avatar
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 2266
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Followers: 254

Kudos [?]: 1448 [2] , given: 245

Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2012, 02:23
2
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
In C, dissipating is not a present participle. It is a gerund. You see from is a preposition. A preposition will always be followed a noun or a noun phrase , or a pronoun or a gerund
_________________

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Manager
Manager
avatar
Status: I will not stop until i realise my goal which is my dream too
Joined: 25 Feb 2010
Posts: 235
Schools: Johnson '15
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 20 [0], given: 16

GMAT Tests User
Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2012, 06:07
Economist wrote:
Set26-37

Sound can travel through water for enormous distances,
prevented from dissipating its acoustic energy as a result of
boundaries in the ocean created by water layers of different
temperatures and densities.
A. prevented from dissipating its acoustic energy as a
result of
B. prevented from having its acoustic energy dissipated by
C. its acoustic energy prevented from dissipating by
D. its acoustic energy prevented from being dissipated as
a result of
E preventing its acoustic energy from dissipating by



sound should be the subject after comma...so A B E are ignored...

so now that answer is between C & D

C: prevented from .... by... : this is perfect
D: prevented from being... as a result of... : wordy and wrong

so ANSWER is clearly C

guys, if answer is otherwise, please educate us
_________________

Regards,
Harsha

Note: Give me kudos if my approach is right , else help me understand where i am missing.. I want to bell the GMAT Cat ;)

Satyameva Jayate - Truth alone triumphs

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 30 Jun 2011
Posts: 275
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 20 [0], given: 20

Reviews Badge
Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2012, 09:13
daagh wrote:
In C, dissipating is not a present participle. It is a gerund. You see from is a preposition. A preposition will always be followed a noun or a noun phrase , or a pronoun or a gerund

Thanks, unfortunately it didnt click even though i know the rule.
Why D is incorrect
Expert Post
Retired Moderator
avatar
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 2266
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Followers: 254

Kudos [?]: 1448 [0], given: 245

Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2012, 10:03
Expert's post
In fact, my first split will be to get rid of the idiom ‘as a result of’ because it is wordy. That is the reason why we can safely eliminate A and D at the first instance.
_________________

Get the best GMAT Prep Resources with GMAT Club Premium Membership

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 30 Jun 2011
Posts: 275
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 20 [0], given: 20

Reviews Badge
Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 21 Apr 2012, 12:16
daagh wrote:
In fact, my first split will be to get rid of the idiom ‘as a result of’ because it is wordy. That is the reason why we can safely eliminate A and D at the first instance.


As a result of - shows cause and effect relationship. boundaries created ... cause, energy prevented...effect. Hence correct
being dissipated is one reason that D can be eliminated
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Dec 2011
Posts: 59
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 23 [0], given: 23

Re: Sound [#permalink] New post 31 Jul 2012, 13:37
Samwong wrote:
The OA is C
The source is Verbal Review 2nd Ed

I'm confused about the structure of the sentence. According to the explanation from the book, "prevented..." is a participial phrase modifying the noun "acoustic energy". Since there is no conjunction between "distances" and "its", is the second part of the sentence an appositive (noun phrase)? If the second part is an appositive, which noun is it modifying?

Main clause

"Sound can travel through water for enormous distances,
its acoustic energy prevented from dissipating by boundaries in the ocean created by water layers of different temperatures and densities."


I had to do some research on this one myself. There is no verb in the second part (missing "is"), so it is not a run-on sentence. Instead, the second phrase is modifying the entire clause. Google "absolute phrase" for construction and some examples. I have seen this maybe 2 other times on official GMAT questions, so I don't think that it is extremely important.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 02 Sep 2010
Posts: 50
Location: India
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 43 [0], given: 17

Re: Sound [#permalink] New post 16 Aug 2012, 16:30
C it is, quite clearly..!
E is very tempting indeed, but if we focus on the meaning, C and D look good.
D is wordy, so C wins.
_________________

The world ain't all sunshine and rainbows. It's a very mean and nasty place and I don't care how tough you are it will beat you to your knees and keep you there permanently if you let it. You, me, or nobody is gonna hit as hard as life. But it ain't about how hard ya hit. It's about how hard you can get it and keep moving forward. How much you can take and keep moving forward. That's how winning is done!

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 18 Nov 2011
Posts: 6
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 5 [0], given: 1

Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 04 Oct 2012, 10:03
Hi,

how come you don't need a FANBOY or semicolon for OA C? are they not 2 independent clauses
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Dec 2011
Posts: 59
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 23 [0], given: 23

Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 04 Oct 2012, 16:54
ttb217 wrote:
Hi,

how come you don't need a FANBOY or semicolon for OA C? are they not 2 independent clauses


The second part is not a clause. What is the verb? Prevented is a past participle modifier as it is passive (acoustic energy is NOT doing the action of preventing - easy to see with the preposition from after prevented).

Also, see previous responses. I am not a grammar guru, but I believe this to be an absolute phrase. Google that to see its usage, but you will probably rarely encounter one.
Expert Post
2 KUDOS received
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 1758
Followers: 1192

Kudos [?]: 3189 [2] , given: 179

Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 12 Sep 2013, 11:55
2
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
Image


Hi fameatop,

This is in response to your PM. :)

Let's analyze the structure of Choice C: Sound can travel through water for enormous distances, its acoustic energy prevented from dissipating by boundaries in the ocean created by water layers of different temperatures and densities.

There is no doubt that the portion before the comma is an Independent Clause with "Sound" as a Subject and "can travel" as a Verb.
Now let's look at the latter portion of the sentence.

its acoustic energy prevented from dissipating by boundaries in the ocean created by water layers of different temperatures and densities.

This structure is actually Noun + Noun Modifier that modifies the preceding clause.
Noun = its acoustic energy
Noun Modifier = prevented from dissipating...

(For more on this topic, please read the article in this link: noun-noun-modifiers-before-we-start-discussing-about-the-137292.html)

What does this portions says? It says that its (sounds) acoustic energy prevented. Now does it make sense that the sound itself prevents its acoustic energy? No, it does. Now read further. "its acoustic energy prevented... by water layers of different temperatures and densities." Now, does this make sense? Yes, it does. This structure actually provided the characteristic of the acoustic energy in that it says that this acoustic energy is prevented from dissipating by water layers of different temperatures and densities.

In original Choice C, "prevented" CANNOT be a passive voice also because it is not preceded by a helping verb such as is/am/are/was/were etc. So, prevented here id just a verb-ed modifier, a Noun Modifier that modifies the preceding noun entity "its acoustic energy". Together this modified noun + noun modifier modifies the preceding clause by presenting the reason for the main action in the sentence.

Remember, we are talking about the CORRCT OFFICIAL answer choice. It cannot have a grave error of fragment.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________



Free Webinar: August 03, 2014 - Improve by 70 Points in 30 days: Register for this Free Webinar to learn how to define your strategy, analyze your mocks and improve by 70 points in 30 days. Click here to register.

Expert Post
BSchool Forum Moderator
avatar
Joined: 27 Aug 2012
Posts: 1095
Followers: 72

Kudos [?]: 425 [0], given: 99

Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 12 Sep 2013, 13:19
Expert's post
Hi Shraddha,
Just a quick question-

Had the sentence/any option been like this "Sound can travel through water for enormous distances and its acoustic energy is prevented from dissipating by...";then also it'd have been correct. Right?
_________________

UPDATED : e-GMAT SC Resources-Consolidated || ALL RC Resources-Consolidated || ALL SC Resources-Consolidated || UPDATED : AWA compilations-109 Analysis of Argument Essays || NEW !!! GMAC's IR Prep Tool

GMAT Club guide - OG 11-12-13 || Veritas Blog || Manhattan GMAT Blog


KUDOS please, if you like the post or if it helps :-)

Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 22 Mar 2013
Posts: 748
Location: India
GPA: 3.51
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 151 [0], given: 122

Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 04 Nov 2013, 01:47
its (Sound's) acoustic energy $ prevented from dissipating by boundaries <<< this statement is in passive voice so why there is no verb such as was, is or been is present before prevented, in sentence refer where I have placed $ sign.

Kindly help to correct my reasoning, I think I am making mistake in relating passive voice concept to this question, please help to clarify.
_________________

Piyush K
-----------------------
Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is to try just one more time. ― Thomas A. Edison
Don't forget to press--> Kudos :)
My Articles: WOULD: when to use?
Tip: Before exam a week earlier don't forget to exhaust all gmatprep problems specially for "sentence correction".

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Dec 2012
Posts: 367
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 28 [0], given: 291

Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 10 Nov 2013, 19:37
Economist wrote:
Set26-37

Sound can travel through water for enormous distances,
prevented from dissipating its acoustic energy as a result of
boundaries in the ocean created by water layers of different
temperatures and densities.
A. prevented from dissipating its acoustic energy as a
result of
B. prevented from having its acoustic energy dissipated by
C. its acoustic energy prevented from dissipating by
D. its acoustic energy prevented from being dissipated as
a result of
E preventing its acoustic energy from dissipating by



The OA is C as per the verbal review. Kindly take note of it.
Verbal Forum Moderator
Verbal Forum Moderator
avatar
Joined: 23 Jul 2010
Posts: 483
Followers: 40

Kudos [?]: 396 [0], given: 239

Premium Member
Re: Sound [#permalink] New post 10 Nov 2013, 19:53
Economist wrote:
OA is E.


Please Do NOT post the incorrect OA on the forum. Always double check before you give the answer and also read the forum rules before posting (given in my signature)
_________________

How to CHOOSE your Business School
Thanks = Kudos. Kudos are appreciated

Rules for posting on the verbal forum
When you post a question Pls. Provide its source & TAG your questions
Avoid posting from unreliable sources such as 1000 series.

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 28 Jul 2013
Posts: 49
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 1

Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 10 Nov 2013, 21:56
bagdbmba wrote:
Just a quick question-

Had the sentence/any option been like this "Sound can travel through water for enormous distances and its acoustic energy is prevented from dissipating by...";then also it'd have been correct. Right?


No it would not have been correct, because the conjunction "and" would have suggested that these are two "independent" facts; but if you really understand the meaning of the original sentence, there is a clear cause and effect. So, a conjunction "as" or "because", instead of "and" would be the right choice.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 28 Jul 2013
Posts: 49
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 3 [0], given: 1

Re: Set26-37 Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 10 Nov 2013, 21:59
PiyushK wrote:
its (Sound's) acoustic energy $ prevented from dissipating by boundaries <<< this statement is in passive voice so why there is no verb such as was, is or been is present before prevented, in sentence refer where I have placed $ sign.

Kindly help to correct my reasoning, I think I am making mistake in relating passive voice concept to this question, please help to clarify.


"is" is "implied" where you have a $. If the sentence had explicitly mentioned a "is", then this would have been wrong, since it would have been a run-on sentence.

I am not sure what "passive voice concept" you are referring to.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 26 Feb 2013
Posts: 184
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 17 [0], given: 25

Re: Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2013, 06:11
It feels like something is missing...

Sound can travel through water for enormous distances, its acoustic energy prevented from dissipating by boundaries in the ocean created by water layers of different temperatures and densities.

If we replace
dissipating by boundaries in the ocean created by water layers of different temperatures and densities
with "something", we get

Sound can travel through water for enormous distances, its acoustic energy prevented from something.

This sounds like saying: Tom arrived late, his colleagues annoyed by this fact.

What I'm trying to say is that this sounds incomplete. I think it's missing a "with" like:
Sound can travel through water for enormous distances, with its acoustic energy prevented from dissipating by boundaries in the ocean created by water layers of different temperatures and densities.
Any takes on this?
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Dec 2012
Posts: 367
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 28 [0], given: 291

Re: Sound can travel through water for enormous [#permalink] New post 06 Dec 2013, 01:57
I think E changes the meaning of the sentence. Acc to me E says sound prevents the acoustic energy from dissipating. Whereas the original sentence means that the acoustic energy is prevented by the boundary walls created by sound.
Re: Sound can travel through water for enormous   [#permalink] 06 Dec 2013, 01:57
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
12 Experts publish their posts in the topic Sound can travel through water for enormous distances, Marcab 28 03 Sep 2012, 08:46
1 Sound can travel through water for enormous distances, goalsnr 6 18 Jun 2008, 19:47
Q37 Sound can travel through water for enormous distances, sidbidus 6 29 Oct 2007, 02:30
Sound can travel through water for enormous distances, singh_amit19 1 29 Sep 2007, 23:45
Sound can travel through water for enormous distances, IWT801 9 11 Dec 2005, 07:25
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Sound can travel through water for enormous

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3    Next  [ 51 posts ] 



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.