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Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his

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Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 11 Oct 2012, 08:11
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Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his career in an unpromising apprenticeship as a Sanskrit scholar and culminated in virtually every honor that European governments and learned societies could bestow.

(A) Muller began his career in an unpromising apprenticeship as
(B) Muller’s career began in an unpromising apprenticeship as
(C) Muller’s career began with the unpromising apprenticeship of being
(D) Muller had begun his career with the unpromising apprenticeship of being
(E) the career of Muller has begun with an unpromising apprenticeship of
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: OG13 V-135 [#permalink] New post 12 Oct 2012, 00:23
Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his career in an unpromising apprenticeship as a Sanskrit scholar and culminated in virtually every honor that European governments and learned societies could bestow.

(A) Muller began his career in an unpromising apprenticeship as
(B) Muller’s career began in an unpromising apprenticeship as
(C) Muller’s career began with the unpromising apprenticeship of being
(D) Muller had begun his career with the unpromising apprenticeship of being
(E) the career of Muller has begun with an unpromising apprenticeship of

Spanning more than fifty years: What is this phrase describing? Muller's career. Rule out A and D.
apprenticeship of being is redundant and "has begun" is not consistent with culminated every honor. Rule out C and E.
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 06 Jan 2013, 22:45
in B , the oa,

I do not understand

apprenticeship as a scholar

"apprenticeship" is a job. why it can be "as " a person

pls explain
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 07 Jan 2013, 02:26
"apprenticeship for" is wrong usage. "Apprenticeship as" is the right usage idiomatically.
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 07 Jan 2013, 11:37
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thangvietnam wrote:
in B , the OA,
I do not understand apprenticeship as a scholar ---"apprenticeship" is a job. why it can be "as " a person
pls explain

Dear thangvietnam,

"Apprenticeship" means the training period for any career --- many times, it is used literally for various artisan crafts (e.g. carpentry, metalwork, bricklayer, etc.) ---- jobs that had official apprentice systems. It can be used, somewhat metaphorically, for the beginning of any type of professional career.

The idiom "apprenticeship as a Sanskrit scholar" is correct. The term "Sanskrit scholar" doesn't merely describe a human being --- it describes human being with a particular job, a particular professional role. The correct idiom is "apprenticeship as a [job role]" ----
apprenticeship as a plumber
apprenticeship as a race car driver
apprenticeship as a human rights lawyer


Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 10 Jan 2013, 02:43
Thank you Magoosh expert.

apprenticeship as a driver
apprentice to a driver

are correct

we do not have
apprentice as a driver

is that right.
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 10 Jan 2013, 10:31
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thangvietnam wrote:
Thank you Magoosh expert.
apprenticeship as a driver
apprentice to a driver

are correct

Dear thangvietnam,
It's true that both "apprenticeship as" and "apprenticeship to" are correct, with slightly different connotations. Using either with the noun "driver" sound very peculiar. Once a person learns to drive on his/her own, there's not much else to learn in order to be a professional driver. One may have to study and take an additional DMV test, but there isn't really any such thing as being an apprentice in some kind of professional driver.

Apprentices are most typical in artisan & craft professions --- a wood-worker, a cabinet maker, an iron-worker, stone mason, an inscription carver, a carpenter, a roofer, a shoe repairman, a tailor, etc. ---- high-skill blue collar jobs. They are not typical in either highly professional white collar jobs (doctor, lawyer, professor, etc.) nor in purely manual jobs (ditch digger, street cleaner, etc.) Even being a professional driver, while requiring moderately more skill than a ditch digger, is not really a "high skill" blue collar job.

If I say "I work as an apprentice as a cabinet maker" --- this has the connotation that, yes, I can call myself a cabinet-maker, but I am very new to the job and still working under the instruction & guidance of someone more experienced. This idiom would be more appropriate for an apprentice toward the end of his apprenticeship, about to "graduate" and become a full artisan on his own.

If I say "I work as an apprentice to a cabinet maker" --- this has the connotation that, I am really just a beginning and have no right even to call myself a "cabinet maker" at this time. I work as an aide to a genuine cabinet maker, and presumably it is my intention to learn the trade so that, one fine day in the future, I would be able to call myself a "cabinet maker." This idiom would be more appropriate for an apprentice toward the beginning of his apprenticeship, still a rank beginner and basically just a glorified servant to the master craftsman.

Does this distinction make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 10 Jan 2013, 20:01
Thank you Magoosh expert

apprentice= person
apprenticeship= action,period

all of the following are correct
apprentice as/to a tailor
apprenticeship as/to a tailor

is that right?

I feel hard to see that apprenticeship as someone is correct.
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 10 Jan 2013, 20:09
as in your previous posting

aprenticeship
can be followed by a person with a skilled job such as plummer

with the implication that the person is not merely human being but a hum being with a skill.

this is what I have to learn.

thank you Magoosh expert. I highly interested in discussion of og questions.
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 10 Jan 2013, 21:45
mikemcgarry wrote:
thangvietnam wrote:
Thank you Magoosh expert.
apprenticeship as a driver
apprentice to a driver

are correct

Dear thangvietnam,
It's true that both "apprenticeship as" and "apprenticeship to" are correct, with slightly different connotations. Using either with the noun "driver" sound very peculiar. Once a person learns to drive on his/her own, there's not much else to learn in order to be a professional driver. One may have to study and take an additional DMV test, but there isn't really any such thing as being an apprentice in some kind of professional driver.

Apprentices are most typical in artisan & craft professions --- a wood-worker, a cabinet maker, an iron-worker, stone mason, an inscription carver, a carpenter, a roofer, a shoe repairman, a tailor, etc. ---- high-skill blue collar jobs. They are not typical in either highly professional white collar jobs (doctor, lawyer, professor, etc.) nor in purely manual jobs (ditch digger, street cleaner, etc.) Even being a professional driver, while requiring moderately more skill than a ditch digger, is not really a "high skill" blue collar job.

If I say "I work as an apprentice as a cabinet maker" --- this has the connotation that, yes, I can call myself a cabinet-maker, but I am very new to the job and still working under the instruction & guidance of someone more experienced. This idiom would be more appropriate for an apprentice toward the end of his apprenticeship, about to "graduate" and become a full artisan on his own.

If I say "I work as an apprentice to a cabinet maker" --- this has the connotation that, I am really just a beginning and have no right even to call myself a "cabinet maker" at this time. I work as an aide to a genuine cabinet maker, and presumably it is my intention to learn the trade so that, one fine day in the future, I would be able to call myself a "cabinet maker." This idiom would be more appropriate for an apprentice toward the beginning of his apprenticeship, still a rank beginner and basically just a glorified servant to the master craftsman.

Does this distinction make sense?
Mike :-)


Could you explain what is exactly the issue with (C):

"Muller’s career began with the unpromising apprenticeship of being "

is " began with" is the issue as well ?

can't we say "apprenticeship of" ?

Thanks
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2013, 15:19
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Practicegmat wrote:
Could you explain what is exactly the issue with (C):
"Muller’s career began with the unpromising apprenticeship of being "
is " began with" is the issue as well? can't we say "apprenticeship of" ?
Thanks

Dear Practicegmat

The idiom "to begin with" is 100% correct, perfectly fine. The problem with (C) is ----- there is no idiom "apprenticeship of", and in particular, the phrasing "apprenticeship of being X" is totally wrong, an incorrect way to say "apprenticeship as X."

Does this make sense?

Mike :-)
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 11 Jan 2013, 17:28
The correct answer is B.

The issue is parallelism: you need the beginning of the sentence to be parallel with the last part of the sentence "culminated in". So you need
"career began in."

Hope this helps......
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 05:19
Hi,
Btween B & C I actually got confused by the phrase "began in"(in B) & began with (in C). Isnt "began with" correct idiomatically. "began in" doesnt sound right.
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 07:16
Hi Nilabh,

Let me see if I can help.

The difference between B&C that is being tested is NOT the idion began in/began with.

Both are absolutely fine.

'Began in' is OK because an 'apprenticeship' is a real thing you can be involved with. So it works the same way as 'began in a factory'

As others have pointed out above, C's issue is "apprenticeship of being X" you should say "apprenticeship as X."

Cheers,

James
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 09:29
Expert's post
Nilabh_s wrote:
Hi,
Btween B & C I actually got confused by the phrase "began in"(in B) & began with (in C). Isnt "began with" correct idiomatically. "began in" doesnt sound right.

Dear Nibalh_s,
Here's a free idiom ebook you may find helpful:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idiom-ebook/
Mike :-)
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his [#permalink] New post 23 Sep 2014, 07:37
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Re: Spanning more than fifty years, Friedrich Muller began his   [#permalink] 23 Sep 2014, 07:37
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