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Students in the metropolitan school district lack math

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Students in the metropolitan school district lack math [#permalink] New post 10 May 2005, 18:32
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

68% (02:37) correct 32% (01:45) wrong based on 3 sessions
Students in the metropolitan school district lack math skills to such a large degree as to make it difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming even more dependant on information-based industries.

A: above lack math skills to such a large degree as to make it difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming
B: lack math skills to a large enough degree that they will be difficult to absorb into a city’s economy that becomes
C: lack of math skills is so large as to be difficult to absorb them into a city’s economy that becomes
D: are lacking so much in math skills as to be difficult to absorb into a city’s economy becoming
E: are so lacking in math skills that it will be difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming

Someone please explain Grammatical Structure of last part (becomes/becoming).

Thanks.
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 [#permalink] New post 10 May 2005, 18:50
becomes vs becoming.. we need the latter to stress the ongoing change in the industry. B and C are out.

A: lack math skills to such a large degree as to make it difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming
- 'them' appears to suggest abosrobgin the math skils into the economy. This is clearly nonsecnsical

D: are lacking so much in math skills as to be difficult to absorb into a city’s economy becoming

E: are so lacking in math skills that it will be difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming
- 'them' appears to suggest abosrobgin the math skils into the economy.

I'll go with D on this one. It's parallel as well, lacking... becoming...
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 [#permalink] New post 10 May 2005, 21:34
"E"

For D, city's economy (versus city economy) is incorrect.
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 [#permalink] New post 10 May 2005, 23:02
becomes is to indicate some thing which has happened
-ing is for present continuous.

Since economy is still dependant, becoming is correct usage.

Between D & E,

are lacking so much .. as ..

..are lacking so... that...

I'll pick E.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 May 2005, 17:27
My Question was what is the use of the portion in red:

Students in the metropolitan school district are so lacking in math skills that it will be difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming even more dependant on information-based industries.

I think this is a Present Participle used as a Adjective and qualifies Noun (City economy).

Students in the metropolitan school district are so lacking in math skills that it will be difficult to absorb them into a city economy.
Now What Kind of city economy: answer is : those economy which are becoming more dependent on information-based industries.

Can you guys please confirm whether my understanding is correct?

Thanks
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 [#permalink] New post 11 May 2005, 19:49
E. The part in D that says, "as to be difficult to absorb into," just does not sound good.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 May 2005, 20:49
jpv wrote:
My Question was what is the use of the portion in red:

Students in the metropolitan school district are so lacking in math skills that it will be difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming even more dependant on information-based industries.

I think this is a Present Participle used as a Adjective and qualifies Noun (City economy).

Students in the metropolitan school district are so lacking in math skills that it will be difficult to absorb them into a city economy.
Now What Kind of city economy: answer is : those economy which are becoming more dependent on information-based industries.

Can you guys please confirm whether my understanding is correct?

Thanks


jpv, your understanding is correct.
which econmy? --- That economy which is becoming(ongoing) more dependent on information-based industries.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2006, 07:47
I choosed A because I thought that the continuous tense in E was wrong.

OE in OG11 says that because the economy is "becoming", the right tense should be "are lacking".

I don't see why. Why should it be a continuous tense, apart from the fact that A is wordier.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2006, 08:02
the idiom is "SO X as to be Y" and only D fits into this equation.

so much in math skills as to be difficult to absorb

as far as become and becoming... both need to be ||... economy is becoming (in the process) X and students are lacking (now, not generally... 10 years ago they could have superb math skills :!: )

D is the only choice that makes sense

whats the OA?
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2006, 08:25
This one is between D & E.

E: are so lacking in math skills that it will be difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming

I will go with E because there is a cause and effect relationship in the stem which is provided appropriately by E.
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Re: SC : OG [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2006, 08:49
should be E

D is awkward since so+adjective+as to V is correct idiom.

D: are lacking so much in math skills as to be difficult to absorb into a city’s economy becoming
lacking should be adjective here 'cuz lacking can not be used as verb, adj+so+adj?? to me much seems adv here.
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Re: SC : OG [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2006, 10:45
jpv wrote:
Students in the metropolitan school district lack math skills to such a large degree as to make it difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming even more dependant on information-based industries.

A: above lack math skills to such a large degree as to make it difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming

them does not have a clear antecedent - is it Students or "math skills".


B: lack math skills to a large enough degree that they will be difficult to absorb into a city’s economy that becomes

The relative pronoun that modifies the nearest noun phrase "math skills" resulting in an awkward structure ---- the math skills will be difficult to absorb...

C: lack of math skills is so large as to be difficult to absorb them into a city’s economy that becomes

"lack of math skills is so large" is unidiomatic

D: are lacking so much in math skills as to be difficult to absorb into a city’s economy becoming

The idiom so X as to be Y doesn't work here because "much in math skills" does not express an idea completely.
E: are so lacking in math skills that it will be difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming

Someone please explain Grammatical Structure of last part (becomes/becoming).

Thanks.


Straight E guys..

Correct idiom is so.. (adjective LACKING) ..that and E uses it correctly.
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Re: SC : OG [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2006, 12:29
jpv wrote:
Students in the metropolitan school district lack math skills to such a large degree as to make it difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming even more dependant on information-based industries.

A: above lack math skills to such a large degree as to make it difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming
B: lack math skills to a large enough degree that they will be difficult to absorb into a city’s economy that becomes
C: lack of math skills is so large as to be difficult to absorb them into a city’s economy that becomes
D: are lacking so much in math skills as to be difficult to absorb into a city’s economy becoming
E: are so lacking in math skills that it will be difficult to absorb them into a city economy becoming

Someone please explain Grammatical Structure of last part (becomes/becoming).

Thanks.


D is my answer.
There are pronoun antecedent problems here.
A: who does 'them' to ?
B: tense problem. becoming changed to becomes.
C: them refers to?
D: correct idiomatically as well as avoids pronoun errors
E: them refers to?
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2006, 21:58
u2lover wrote:
the idiom is "SO X as to be Y" and only D fits into this equation.

so much in math skills as to be difficult to absorb

as far as become and becoming... both need to be ||... economy is becoming (in the process) X and students are lacking (now, not generally... 10 years ago they could have superb math skills :!: )

D is the only choice that makes sense

whats the OA?


E .. I think qn is testing idiom so .. that..

Here is "so as to" usage..

Correct: Her debts are so extreme as to threaten the future of the company
“So asâ€
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Jul 2006, 02:14
u2lover wrote:
the idiom is "SO X as to be Y" and only D fits into this equation.

so much in math skills as to be difficult to absorb

as far as become and becoming... both need to be ||... economy is becoming (in the process) X and students are lacking (now, not generally... 10 years ago they could have superb math skills :!: )

D is the only choice that makes sense

whats the OA?


Well even I went with D...

BTW the correct idiom is "SO X as to Y" not "SO X as to be Y", there is no be.

But I find it hard to digest that a city economy wins over a city's economy which sounds much better.

Anybody for why city economy is better that city's economy ??? :beat
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Jul 2006, 07:15
sumitsarkar82 wrote:
BTW the correct idiom is "SO X as to Y" not "SO X as to be Y", there is no be.


according to MGMAT SC there may or may not be BE. page 107
GMAX also covered the idiom with "TO BE" in it...
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 [#permalink] New post 20 Jul 2006, 22:46
u2lover wrote:
sumitsarkar82 wrote:
BTW the correct idiom is "SO X as to Y" not "SO X as to be Y", there is no be.


according to MGMAT SC there may or may not be BE. page 107
GMAX also covered the idiom with "TO BE" in it...


I was referring to the Princeton Review.....

I guess we need a third opinion here.... :peek
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Re: Students in the metropolitan school district lack math [#permalink] New post 18 Sep 2013, 07:30
E for me

Not sure why people like D- "as to be difficult to absorb into a cityâ" makes no sense, absorb what?
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Re: Students in the metropolitan school district lack math [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 02:24
thats absoulutely E
Students in metropolitan school plural
so lacking... that.. true combination
Re: Students in the metropolitan school district lack math   [#permalink] 20 Sep 2013, 02:24
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