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Studies of test scores show that watching television has a

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Senior Manager
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Studies of test scores show that watching television has a [#permalink] New post 25 Aug 2007, 21:49
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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(N/A)

Question Stats:

100% (01:12) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 1 sessions
Studies of test scores show that watching television has a markedly positive effect on children whose parents speak English as a second language, as compared to those who are native English speakers.

a. to those who are
b. with children who are
c. with
d. to those whose parents are
e. with children whose parents are

EXPLAIN your answers
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Re: SC....watching television [#permalink] New post 25 Aug 2007, 22:03
empty_spaces wrote:
Studies of test scores show that watching television has a markedly positive effect on children whose parents speak English as a second language, as compared to those who are native English speakers.

a. to those who are
b. with children who are
c. with
d. to those whose parents are
e. with children whose parents are

EXPLAIN your answers


E. its tough between B and E but i think E is more parallel.
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Re: SC....watching television [#permalink] New post 25 Aug 2007, 22:12
empty_spaces wrote:
Studies of test scores show that watching television has a markedly positive effect on children whose parents speak English as a second language, as compared to those who are native English speakers.

a. to those who are
b. with children who are
c. with
d. to those whose parents are
e. with children whose parents are

EXPLAIN your answers


I think E
compare with is the correct here since we are evaluating the two.
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Re: SC....watching television [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2007, 05:23
empty_spaces wrote:
Studies of test scores show that watching television has a markedly positive effect on children whose parents speak English as a second language, as compared to those who are native English speakers.

a. to those who are
b. with children who are
c. with
d. to those whose parents are
e. with children whose parents are

EXPLAIN your answers


Here the comparision is between Children with parents who are native speakers of english and children with parents who are non native speakers of english

So A, B and C are ruled out as they compare X with children who are native speakers.

Between D and E, compare "WITH" should be used as we are looking for both similarities and differenences between X and Y.

Below is the rule.

To identify either the similarities or the differences between two things, use "compare to."

To identify both the similarities and the differences, use "compare with.
" In comparing with something, one finds or discusses both things that are alike and things that are different.

Here is better information I found on google.

Compare usually takes the preposition to when it refers to the activity of describing the resemblances between unlike things: He compared her to a summer day. Scientists sometimes compare the human brain to a computer. It takes with when it refers to the act of examining two like things in order to discern their similarities or differences: The police compared the forged signature with the original. The committee will have to compare the Senate’s version of the bill with the version that was passed by the House. When compare is used to mean “to liken (one) with another,” with is traditionally held to be the correct preposition: That little bauble is not to be compared with (not to) this enormous jewel. But to is frequently used in this context and is not incorrect.
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Re: SC....watching television [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2007, 07:04
empty_spaces wrote:
Studies of test scores show that watching television has a markedly positive effect on children whose parents speak English as a second language, as compared to those who are native English speakers.

a. to those who are
b. with children who are
c. with
d. to those whose parents are
e. with children whose parents are

EXPLAIN your answers


While I agree on the usage differences between compared to and compared with - I still believe the answer to this is D. Compared to is fine here because of the usage of as...

as compared to seems to go more with the flow than as compared with.

I may be wrong though..

Please let us know the OA.
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Re: SC....watching television [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2007, 07:10
dwivedys wrote:
empty_spaces wrote:
Studies of test scores show that watching television has a markedly positive effect on children whose parents speak English as a second language, as compared to those who are native English speakers.

a. to those who are
b. with children who are
c. with
d. to those whose parents are
e. with children whose parents are

EXPLAIN your answers


While I agree on the usage differences between compared to and compared with - I still believe the answer to this is D. Compared to is fine here because of the usage of as...

as compared to seems to go more with the flow than as compared with.

I may be wrong though..

Please let us know the OA.


I think "compared with" is correct here. Though as...as to sounds a bit pleasing to the ear probably the context of juxtaposing 2 sets of samples for comparision needs "with".
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2007, 08:51
E is correct not only is it parallel but also uses the correct idom compared with
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2007, 10:17
Oh man...i'm still confused between when to use "compare to" versus "compare with". Based on just parallelism though, I would pick E.
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Re: SC....watching television [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2007, 22:09
trivikram wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
empty_spaces wrote:
Studies of test scores show that watching television has a markedly positive effect on children whose parents speak English as a second language, as compared to those who are native English speakers.

a. to those who are
b. with children who are
c. with
d. to those whose parents are
e. with children whose parents are

EXPLAIN your answers


While I agree on the usage differences between compared to and compared with - I still believe the answer to this is D. Compared to is fine here because of the usage of as...

as compared to seems to go more with the flow than as compared with.

I may be wrong though..

Please let us know the OA.


I think "compared with" is correct here. Though as...as to sounds a bit pleasing to the ear probably the context of juxtaposing 2 sets of samples for comparision needs "with".



thats why i choose E. otherwise D would be fine.





OA???????
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2007, 22:19
Should be E - we compare children, whose parents are native speakers with those, whose are not.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Aug 2007, 22:38
OA is E
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Aug 2007, 12:17
oh goood! Whew, I also went with E. Thanks for the explanations Rajesh!
  [#permalink] 28 Aug 2007, 12:17
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