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Studies show that young people with higher-than-average

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Studies show that young people with higher-than-average [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2003, 13:41
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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(N/A)

Question Stats:

75% (01:09) correct 25% (00:00) wrong based on 8 sessions
Studies show that young people with higher-than-average blood pressure and their families have a history of high blood pressure are more likely than others to develop a severe form of the condition.
(A) and their families have a history of high blood pressure
(B) whose families have a history of high blood pressure
(C) and a history of high blood pressure runs in the family
(D) whose families have a history of high blood pressure running in them
(E) with a history of high blood pressure running in their family
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2003, 13:48
B.
supports the opening sentence and concurs the flow
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jul 2004, 06:52
Reopening an OLD SC...

I got this wrong. I am not quite convinved with (B).
Does "whose" not incorrectly signifies "blood pressure" :?: :roll:

Please input your thoughts...
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jul 2004, 07:50
15 sec. B it is
"whose" correctly refers families to the young people--> It is the young people's families, not the families of the blood pressure as the other choices imply. D is just superfluous. Where else can blood pressure be but running in those persons?
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jul 2004, 08:24
[quote="jpv"]Reopening an OLD SC...
I got this wrong. I am not quite convinved with (B).
quote]
nope, dude. who(whose) refers to people. it cant refer to things.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jul 2004, 21:50
Marat2005 wrote:
jpv wrote:
Reopening an OLD SC...
I got this wrong. I am not quite convinved with (B).
quote]
nope, dude. who(whose) refers to people. it cant refer to things.


Um, just a quick note, "whose" may in fact refer to things. :)
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jul 2004, 22:20
ob wrote:
Marat2005 wrote:
jpv wrote:
Reopening an OLD SC...
I got this wrong. I am not quite convinved with (B).
quote]
nope, dude. who(whose) refers to people. it cant refer to things.


Um, just a quick note, "whose" may in fact refer to things. :)

If so, i'd like to know in which cases. could you plz give me a couple of links or elaborate it how it is acceptable on the gmat. thanks a lot.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Jul 2004, 22:30
Marat2005 wrote:
ob wrote:
Marat2005 wrote:
jpv wrote:
Reopening an OLD SC...
I got this wrong. I am not quite convinved with (B).
quote]
nope, dude. who(whose) refers to people. it cant refer to things.


Um, just a quick note, "whose" may in fact refer to things. :)

If so, i'd like to know in which cases. could you plz give me a couple of links or elaborate it how it is acceptable on the gmat. thanks a lot.


Hi there Marat,

I'm not sure this usage is tested on the GMAT, but I believe I've seen a couple of GMAT-type questions where a "whose"-phrase referring to inanimate objects was the correct answer. Anyway, I believe it pays to be prepared :-D Below is an excerpt from The American Heritage Book of English Usage.

You can use whose as a possessive to refer to both animate and inanimate nouns. Thus you can say Crick, whose theories still influence work in laboratories around the world or Crick’s theories, whose influence continues to be felt in laboratories around the world. With inanimate nouns you can also use of which as an alternative, as in Crick’s theories, the influence of which continues to be felt in laboratories around the world. But as this example demonstrates, substituting of which for whose is sometimes cumbersome.
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2004, 04:10
ob wrote:
Hi there Marat,

I'm not sure this usage is tested on the GMAT, but I believe I've seen a couple of GMAT-type questions where a "whose"-phrase referring to inanimate objects was the correct answer. Anyway, I believe it pays to be prepared :-D Below is an excerpt from The American Heritage Book of English Usage.

You can use whose as a possessive to refer to both animate and inanimate nouns. Thus you can say Crick, whose theories still influence work in laboratories around the world or Crick’s theories, whose influence continues to be felt in laboratories around the world. With inanimate nouns you can also use of which as an alternative, as in Crick’s theories, the influence of which continues to be felt in laboratories around the world. But as this example demonstrates, substituting of which for whose is sometimes cumbersome.


Hola and thanks for your reply,
Yes, i see know that we can use whose as possesive form of which and as possesive form of who
whose=of whom or of which. although it seems to be restricted to cases in which whose=adjective
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Re: SC [#permalink] New post 12 Jul 2004, 06:34
It is B, I believe. B has everything going nice.
A, C - grammatically wrong
D, E - 'running in their family' does not look idiomatic.

chihao wrote:
Studies show that young people with higher-than-average blood pressure and their families have a history of high blood pressure are more likely than others to develop a severe form of the condition.
(A) and their families have a history of high blood pressure
(B) whose families have a history of high blood pressure
(C) and a history of high blood pressure runs in the family
(D) whose families have a history of high blood pressure running in them
(E) with a history of high blood pressure running in their family

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 [#permalink] New post 13 Jul 2004, 06:48
So, it means I should read the sentence like this:

... young people (with higher-than-average blood pressure) whose families have a history of high blood pressure

Prepositional Phrase (modifying young people): with higher-than-average blood pressure
Relative Clause (whose is relative pronoun whose antecendent is ypng people) : whose families have a history of high blood pressure

Please let me know whether I have understoold correct.

Thanks
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Jul 2004, 07:34
So, it means I should read the sentence like this:

... young people (with higher-than-average blood pressure) whose families have a history of high blood pressure

Prepositional Phrase (modifying young people): with higher-than-average blood pressure
Relative Clause (whose is relative pronoun whose antecendent is ypng people) : whose families have a history of high blood pressure

Please let me know whether I have understoold correct.

Thanks
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 [#permalink] New post 13 Jul 2004, 07:42
jpv wrote:
So, it means I should read the sentence like this:

... young people (with higher-than-average blood pressure) whose families have a history of high blood pressure

Prepositional Phrase (modifying young people): with higher-than-average blood pressure
Relative Clause (whose is relative pronoun whose antecendent is ypng people) : whose families have a history of high blood pressure

Please let me know whether I have understoold correct.

Thanks

Yes jpv, I agree with your analysis of prep./rel. clauses
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jul 2004, 20:06
Anyone want to take a swing at why "A" is incorrect?
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jul 2004, 20:16
A does not have correct sentence structure and is illogical
Sounds as if young people with higher-than-average blood pressure and their families which have high blood pressure.

young people with higher-than-average blood pressure having high blood pressure does not make sense. It should convey the meaning of those families's high blood pressure which is correctly said in B
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 [#permalink] New post 20 May 2005, 14:38
Reopening it second time. I got this wrong again :cry: .

This time my question is slightly different.

Correct (OA) Sentence is:

Studies show that young people with higher-than-average blood pressure whose families have a history of high blood pressure are more likely than others to develop a severe form of the condition.


Is it a rule of thumb that "whose" will modify "Young ppl", not blood group?
Can there any case similar to when subject of dependent clause (like whose here) will modify Object of the Prepositional Phrase (either separated by comma or not separated by comma)? If yes, then please give some examples.
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 [#permalink] New post 20 May 2005, 17:29
jpv wrote:
Reopening it second time. I got this wrong again :cry: .

This time my question is slightly different.

Correct (OA) Sentence is:

Studies show that young people with higher-than-average blood pressure whose families have a history of high blood pressure are more likely than others to develop a severe form of the condition.


Is it a rule of thumb that "whose" will modify "Young ppl", not blood group?
Can there any case similar to when subject of dependent clause (like whose here) will modify Object of the Prepositional Phrase (either separated by comma or not separated by comma)? If yes, then please give some examples.


Your earlier summary about the prepositional phrase and the relative clause was dead-on.

Maybe you killed off the brain cells that judge this particular sentence :twisted:

While whose can refer to an inanimate object, it just would never make sense for "blood pressure" to be referred to by "whose families" ... blood pressure will never have a family, that's a non sequitar. So this sentence is not at all ambiguous.

In other words, the context of this sentence influences its grammar.

However, no doubt one could think of a correct sentence where a "whose" phrase does refer to the object preceeding it. How about this:

Studies show that people with cats whose claws have been removed are less likely to suffer cuts and scratches when playing with their pets.
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 [#permalink] New post 20 May 2005, 19:21
Agree with supercat... How can I not :twisted:

"whose" is a relative pronoun and similar to "which" or "that" can refer to the object of the preposition or the subject of the IC. Most of times, it will refer to the object of the preposition though. When analyzing complex SC, you will notice that you can have a sentence parallel in 2 or 3 answer choices but it is crucial to look at the logical reasoning inferred by those choices. Are they comparing the right elements so as to make sense? A similar difficult SC whereby you could not justify an answer over the other simply based on parallellism: http://www.gmatclub.com/phpbb/viewtopic ... c&start=20
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  [#permalink] 20 May 2005, 19:21
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