Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 24 Oct 2014, 19:18

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
VP
VP
User avatar
Status: Far, far away!
Joined: 02 Sep 2012
Posts: 1125
Location: Italy
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.8
Followers: 113

Kudos [?]: 1198 [0], given: 219

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 03 May 2013, 11:26
Here is my question about Patterns/Series

Given a_1=-81 and a_n=a_{n-1}+3 for n>1, what is the value of the sum of the first 54 elements: a_1+a_2+...+a_{53}+a_{54} ?

A)0
B)-78
C)-81
D)81
E)78

[Reveal] Spoiler:
OA: C)-81

the sequence is as follow:
a_1=-81 a_2=-78 ... and this will reach 0 is 27 passages a_{28}=0 and then will become positive and every term will balance its negative correspondent.

a_{27}=-3 will be balanced by a_{29}=3 => sum=0 and so on...
This process continues for all terms, if the question were "What is the sum of the first 55 terms the balance will be perfect and the sum would be 0.

But here we are asked the sum of the 54 terms: the very first term will not be balanced!
a_{1}=-81, a_{2}=-78, ..., a_{54}=78

The sum is -81.

_________________

It is beyond a doubt that all our knowledge that begins with experience.

Kant , Critique of Pure Reason

Tips and tricks: Inequalities , Mixture | Review: MGMAT workshop
Strategy: SmartGMAT v1.0 | Questions: Verbal challenge SC I-II- CR New SC set out !! , My Quant

Rules for Posting in the Verbal Forum - Rules for Posting in the Quant Forum[/size][/color][/b]

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: Pushing Hard
Affiliations: GNGO2, SSCRB
Joined: 30 Sep 2012
Posts: 92
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.33
WE: Analyst (Health Care)
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 62 [1] , given: 11

Reviews Badge
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 03 May 2013, 17:33
1
This post received
KUDOS
Zarrolou wrote:
Here is my question about Patterns/Series

Given a_1=-81 and a_n=a_{n-1}+3 for n>1, what is the value of the sum of the first 54 elements: a_1+a_2+...+a_{53}+a_{54} ?

A)0
B)-78
C)-81
D)81
E)78

[Reveal] Spoiler:
OA: C)-81

the sequence is as follow:
a_1=-81 a_2=-78 ... and this will reach 0 is 27 passages a_{28}=0 and then will become positive and every term will balance its negative correspondent.

a_{27}=-3 will be balanced by a_{29}=3 => sum=0 and so on...
This process continues for all terms, if the question were "What is the sum of the first 55 terms the balance will be perfect and the sum would be 0.

But here we are asked the sum of the 54 terms: the very first term will not be balanced!
a_{1}=-81, a_{2}=-78, ..., a_{54}=78

The sum is -81.


Given a_1=-81 , and a_n=a_{n-1}+3 for n>1,

Therefore, a_2=a_{1}+3
& a_3=a_{2}+3

This means the Common increment of 3, & as we know that there are 54 terms in total but if we remove a_1 , then we will have 53 terms each increasing with the common increment of 3. Therefore we have a_54 as 3*53-81.

a_54 =159 - 81 \Rightarrow a_54 =78.

Now, we have first term & the last term & the common difference. so as per the properties.....

--> \frac{Last Term + First Term}{2} * Total # of Terms

---> \frac{78-81}{2}*54

-----> -27*3 \Rightarrow Hence, -81.
_________________

If you don’t make mistakes, you’re not working hard. And Now that’s a Huge mistake.

1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 19 Dec 2012
Posts: 26
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, International Business
GPA: 3.75
WE: Supply Chain Management (Consumer Products)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 11 [1] , given: 8

Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 04 May 2013, 22:49
1
This post received
KUDOS
Question :

Two cars move along a circular track 1.2 miles long at constant speeds. When they move in opposite directions, they meet every 15 seconds. However, when they move in same direction, once car overtakes the other car every 60 seconds. What is the speed of the faster car ?

Options :

A) 0.02 miles/s
B) 0.03 miles/s
C) 0.05 miles/s
D) 0.08 miles/s
E) 0.1 miles/s

Answer :
[Reveal] Spoiler:
C) 0.05 miles/s


Explanation :
[Reveal] Spoiler:
- Let the speed of the 2 dots be "a" (faster dot) and "b" (slower dot) miles/s respectively.
- When they move in opposite directions, \frac{1.2}{a+b}=15
- When they move in same direction, \frac{1.2}{a-b}=60
- Simplifying 2 equations, we get 15a + 15b = 1.2 and 60a - 60b = 1.2
- Solving 2 equations, 120a = 6 or a = 0.05 miles/s

_________________

Kudos Please... If my post helped.


Last edited by dipen01 on 04 May 2013, 23:03, edited 1 time in total.
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 19 Dec 2012
Posts: 26
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, International Business
GPA: 3.75
WE: Supply Chain Management (Consumer Products)
Followers: 0

Kudos [?]: 11 [0], given: 8

Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 04 May 2013, 23:02
Question :

How many chocolates did the two girls buy, if the sum of the cubes of the number of chocolates bought by them adds up to 189 and the result of subtracting the product of chocolates bought by them from the sum of the squares of the chocolates bought by them is 21 ?

Options :

A) 21
B) 5
C) 20
D) 16
E) 9

Answer :
[Reveal] Spoiler:
E) 9


Explanation :
[Reveal] Spoiler:
- Let the number of chocolates bought by one of the toddlers be "x" and the number of chocolates bought by second toddler be "y"
- Then, x^3 + y^3 = 189......... (I)
- and x^2 + y^2 - xy = 21..........(II)
- x^3 + y^3 = (x+y)(x^2 - xy + y^2)
- Thus by dividing equation (I) by equation (II) we will get the value of x + y = 9

_________________

Kudos Please... If my post helped.

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Dec 2011
Posts: 59
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 26 [0], given: 24

Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 16 May 2013, 12:26
dipen01 wrote:
Question :

How many chocolates did the two girls buy, if the sum of the cubes of the number of chocolates bought by them adds up to 189 and the result of subtracting the product of chocolates bought by them from the sum of the squares of the chocolates bought by them is 21 ?

Options :

A) 21
B) 5
C) 20
D) 16
E) 9

Answer :
[Reveal] Spoiler:
E) 9


Explanation :
[Reveal] Spoiler:
- Let the number of chocolates bought by one of the toddlers be "x" and the number of chocolates bought by second toddler be "y"
- Then, x^3 + y^3 = 189......... (I)
- and x^2 + y^2 - xy = 21..........(II)
- x^3 + y^3 = (x+y)(x^2 - xy + y^2)
- Thus by dividing equation (I) by equation (II) we will get the value of x + y = 9

Another way to do this that involves only the first equation is to realize that x and y must be integers and that there is a max on x and y. Since 6^3 is 216, the max on x and y is 5. It is impossible for x^3 + y^3 to equal 189 if x + y = 5, so the only possible answer is 9. In fact, the only combination of positive integers that works for the first equation is 4 and 5.

The question difficulty could be improved if the answers were all between 5 and 10. It could also be improved by removing the second equation from the question (and then it would require the same trick as OG13 #64).
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Feb 2013
Posts: 375
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
GPA: 3.3
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 52 [0], given: 326

CAT Tests
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 17 May 2013, 02:25
If x = 1! + 2! + 3! + 4! + ....+ 456!, what will be the remainder if x is divided by 7?

A) 1
B) 5
C) 8
D) 5
E) 3

[Reveal] Spoiler:
7! onward all the terms will be divisible by 7, hence the summation of 1! till 6! should only give a remainder when divided by 7.

1! + 2! + 3! + 4! + 5! + 6! = 1 + 2 + -1 + 3 + 1 -1 = 5 is the OA

_________________

Thanks,
Kinjal
Never Give Up !!!

Please click on Kudos, if you think the post is helpful
Linkedin Handle : https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=116231592

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Feb 2013
Posts: 375
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
GPA: 3.3
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 52 [0], given: 326

CAT Tests
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 17 May 2013, 03:50
A question paper had 40 questions. Every correct answer would fetch 4 marks and every wrong answer would deduct 1 mark from the total. The unanswered questions doesn't have any impact on the total score. How many distinct scores can be obtained by a student if he/she takes the test

A) 200
B) 201
C) 197
D) 195
E) 194

[Reveal] Spoiler:
The highest score can be obtained by any of the student is +160 and minimum score can be obtained is -40, Hence the total number of scores can be obtained is 160+40 + 1 (zero) = 201

Now some of the scores are not possible such as 159, 158, 157, 154, 153 and 149, hence 201 - 6 = D) 195

_________________

Thanks,
Kinjal
Never Give Up !!!

Please click on Kudos, if you think the post is helpful
Linkedin Handle : https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=116231592

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Feb 2013
Posts: 375
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
GPA: 3.3
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 52 [0], given: 326

CAT Tests
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 17 May 2013, 04:15
How many ways 5! can be written as summation of consecutive positive integers not necessarily starting from 1?

A) 0
B) 1
C) 2
D) 3
E) 4

[Reveal] Spoiler:
It can be solved using the AP of common difference of 1, that becomes lengthy.

Let's observe a pattern here.

3 can be written in consecutive terms as 1+2 - 1 way , 5 = 2+3 - 1 way, 15 = 8+7, 1+2+3+4+5, 4+5+6 - 3 ways, we can see it is number of odd factors of the number -1

Hence 5! can only two odd factors 3 and 5, hence the number of ways should be 4-1 = 3 ways C)

5! = 120

39+40+41, 18+19+20+21+22, 1+ 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+ 7+ 8 + 9 +10 + 11+ 12+13+14+15

Also one more strategy can be applied has 120/odd number to get number of ways to find the consecutive terms

2 ways to solve the problem :)

_________________

Thanks,
Kinjal
Never Give Up !!!

Please click on Kudos, if you think the post is helpful
Linkedin Handle : https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=116231592

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Feb 2013
Posts: 375
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
GPA: 3.3
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 52 [0], given: 326

CAT Tests
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 17 May 2013, 04:36
How many ways can can 23 chocolates can be distributed into 3 students such as everyone gets at least one and none gets more than 10?

A) 23C2
B) 20C2
C) 21C2 - 3*11C2
D) 22C2-3*11C2
E) 23C2-3*11C2

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Let's say A+B+C = 23
As every body should get 1 chocolate, hence assigning 1 to each, the equation becomes A+B+C = 20, and number of ways of distributing chocolates = 22C2

Now none should get more than 10, lets assign 11 to A, then the equation becomes A+B+C = 9, hence number of ways of distribution being 11C2 -> That many cases is when A gets more than 10 and similarly for all the people, the number of cases being 3*11C2

Hence number of ways being 22C2-3*11C2 D)

_________________

Thanks,
Kinjal
Never Give Up !!!

Please click on Kudos, if you think the post is helpful
Linkedin Handle : https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=116231592

1 KUDOS received
Director
Director
User avatar
Status: My Thread Master Bschool Threads-->Krannert(Purdue),WP Carey(Arizona),Foster(Uwashngton)
Joined: 27 Jun 2011
Posts: 894
Followers: 62

Kudos [?]: 157 [1] , given: 57

GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 17 May 2013, 21:05
1
This post received
KUDOS
My .02 cents

The Oxford press compiled a 2000 page dictionary but just before printing,it was found that page numbers are missing. How many times should typist press keys from 0-9 so as to number dictionary from 1-2000?

1) 6889
2) 6883
3) 6879
4) 6893
5) 5782

Answer
[Reveal] Spoiler:
4


Explanation
[Reveal] Spoiler:
count digits from 1-2000...
1-9------9digits
10-99---90x2
100-99----900x3
1000-2000-1001x4
ans 6893

_________________

General GMAT useful links-->

Indian Bschools Accepting Gmat | My Gmat Daily Diary | All Gmat Practice CAT's | MBA Ranking 2013 | How to Convert Indian GPA/ Percentage to US 4 pt. GPA scale | GMAT MATH BOOK in downloadable PDF format| POWERSCORE CRITICAL REASONING BIBLE - FULL CHAPTER NOTES | Result correlation between GMAT and GMAT Club's Tests | Best GMAT Stories - Period!

More useful links-->

GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios| GMAT and MBA 101|Everything You Need to Prepare for the GMAT|New to the GMAT Club? <START HERE>|GMAT ToolKit: iPhone/iPod/iPad/Android application|

Verbal Treasure Hunt-->

"Ultimate" Study Plan for Verbal on the GMAT|Books to Read (Improve Verbal Score and Enjoy a Good Read)|Best Verbal GMAT Books 2012|Carcass Best EXTERNAL resources to tackle the GMAT Verbal Section|Ultimate GMAT Grammar Book from GC club [Free Download]|Ultimate Sentence Correction Encyclopedia|Souvik's The Most Comprehensive Collection Of Everything Official-SC|ALL SC Rules+Official Qs by Experts & Legendary Club Members|Meaning/Clarity SC Question Bank by Carcass_Souvik|Critical Reasoning Shortcuts and Tips|Critical Reasoning Megathread!|The Most Comprehensive Collection Of Everything Official- CR|GMAT Club's Reading Comprehension Strategy Guide|The Most Comprehensive Collection Of Everything Official- RC|Ultimate Reading Comprehension Encyclopedia|ALL RC Strategy+Official Q by Experts&Legendary Club Members

----
---
--
-


1 KUDOS = 1 THANK


Kick Ass Gmat

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Feb 2013
Posts: 375
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
GPA: 3.3
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 52 [0], given: 326

CAT Tests
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 17 May 2013, 21:50
X is divided by a divisor leaves 19 as a remainder, and when 5X is divided by the same divisor , it leaves 29 as the remainder. What remainder would be obtained if 6X is divided by the same divisor?

A) 48
B) 38
C) 19
D) 10
E) 3

[Reveal] Spoiler:
As per the equation:

X = DA + 19 if D is the divisor and A is the quotient.
5X = DB + 29 if B is the quotient.

5X = 5DA + 5*19 = 5DA + 95 but the remainder should be 29, hence 95-29 = 66 is the multiple of D. The factors of D are 1, 6,11, 66.

1, 6, 11 cannot be D as 19 and 29 are remainders, hence D should be 66

Hence 11X = 11DA + 19*11 = 11DA + 201. As D = 66, hence 11X should leave a remainder of (201/66) Remainder = 3

_________________

Thanks,
Kinjal
Never Give Up !!!

Please click on Kudos, if you think the post is helpful
Linkedin Handle : https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=116231592

Cornell-Johnson Thread Master
User avatar
Joined: 04 Mar 2013
Posts: 65
GMAT 1: 770 Q50 V44
GPA: 3.66
WE: Operations (Manufacturing)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 38 [0], given: 26

Reviews Badge
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 17 May 2013, 22:52
Heres my question

In how many ways can 12 girls be divided into 4 different groups, such that each group contains atleast one girl?

A) 12C4 x 4!
B) 12P4
C) 11C3 X 12!
D) 12C4
E) 12C3 x 9C3 x 6C3

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Correct Answer : C

The explanation is as follows :
The question doesnt state that the groups have to be equal. A group can have any number of girls between 1 and 9. So 12C3 x 9C3 x 6C3 wont be the answer. It can be solved using the following technique
- - - - - - - - - - - -
The 12 different girls can be arranged in a single line in 12! ways

To arrange them into 4 groups with atleast 1 girl in each lets consider markers which will divide the line into 4 parts. So we require 3 markers which can divide the line as follows

part1 Marker1 part2 marker2 part 3 marker3 part4

There are 11 spaces in the line of girls as shown above

-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-
The markers can be places in the above 11 places in 11C3 ways

Therefore the ways of dividing the girls into 4 groups is 11C3 X 12! i.e C

_________________

When you feel like giving up, remember why you held on for so long in the first place.

Cornell-Johnson Thread Master
User avatar
Joined: 04 Mar 2013
Posts: 65
GMAT 1: 770 Q50 V44
GPA: 3.66
WE: Operations (Manufacturing)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 38 [0], given: 26

Reviews Badge
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 17 May 2013, 23:41
a question very similar to the one above but with a twist

In how many ways can 14 similar balls be dropped into 4 bins

A) 14C4 x 4!
B) 14P4
C) 11C3 X 12!
D) 17C3
E) 14^4 x 10^3 x 7C2

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Correct Answer : D

The explanation is as follows :
The Balls are similar so the order or the arrangement will not matter. Only the ways the balls can be grouped is important. Also the balls have to be dropped into the bins so one scenario is that all the 14 balls are dropped into one bin and other 3 bins are empty
The balls can be placed as such
- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

To arrange them into 4 groups such that the no. of balls in any bin varies from 0-14.lets consider markers which will divide the line into 4 parts. So we require 3 markers which can divide the line as follows

part1 Marker1 part2 marker2 part 3 marker3 part4

So there are 14 balls and 3 markers

III and - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

In case the marker is placed as

III- - - - - - - - - - - - - -
we have all the 14 balls in the 4th bin and none in the other 3

When its like
II-I - - - - - - - - - - - - -
There are 13 balls in the 4th bin and 1 ball in the 3rd bin

So the ways of arranging these 17 items is \frac{17!}{(14!*3!)} as 14 balls and 3 markers are the same

In other words the balls can be dropped in 4 different bins in 17C3 ways which is the same as \frac{17!}{(14!*3!)}

_________________

When you feel like giving up, remember why you held on for so long in the first place.


Last edited by aceacharya on 18 May 2013, 01:08, edited 2 times in total.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Feb 2013
Posts: 375
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
GPA: 3.3
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 52 [0], given: 326

CAT Tests
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 18 May 2013, 00:40
aceacharya wrote:
a question very similar to the one above but with a twist

In how many ways can 14 similar balls be dropped into 4 bins

A) 14C4 x 4!
B) 14P4
C) 11C3 X 12!
D) 16C3
E) 14C4 x 10C3 x 7C2

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Correct Answer : D

The explanation is as follows :
The Balls are similar so the order or the arrangement will not matter. Only the ways the balls can be grouped is important. Also the balls have to be dropped into the bins so one scenario is that all the 14 balls are dropped into one bin and other 3 bins are empty
The balls can be placed as such
- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

To arrange them into 4 groups such that the no. of balls in any bin varies from 0-14.lets consider markers which will divide the line into 4 parts. So we require 3 markers which can divide the line as follows

part1 Marker1 part2 marker2 part 3 marker3 part4

For this we have 16 places to place the markers

III-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-

In case the marker is placed as

III- - - - - - - - - - - - - -
we have all the 14 balls in the 4th bin and none in the other 3

When its like
II-I - - - - - - - - - - - - -
There are 13 balls in the 4th bin and 1 ball in the 3rd bin

so the 3 markers can be placed in the 16 places in 16C3 ways

In other words the balls can be dropped in 4 different bins in 16C3 ways


I guess it should by 17C3, 14 balls + 3 markers.... Isn't it?
_________________

Thanks,
Kinjal
Never Give Up !!!

Please click on Kudos, if you think the post is helpful
Linkedin Handle : https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=116231592

Cornell-Johnson Thread Master
User avatar
Joined: 04 Mar 2013
Posts: 65
GMAT 1: 770 Q50 V44
GPA: 3.66
WE: Operations (Manufacturing)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 38 [0], given: 26

Reviews Badge
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 18 May 2013, 01:00
kinjiGC wrote:
aceacharya wrote:
a question very similar to the one above but with a twist

In how many ways can 14 similar balls be dropped into 4 bins

A) 14C4 x 4!
B) 14P4
C) 11C3 X 12!
D) 16C3
E) 14C4 x 10C3 x 7C2

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Correct Answer : D

The explanation is as follows :
The Balls are similar so the order or the arrangement will not matter. Only the ways the balls can be grouped is important. Also the balls have to be dropped into the bins so one scenario is that all the 14 balls are dropped into one bin and other 3 bins are empty
The balls can be placed as such
- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

To arrange them into 4 groups such that the no. of balls in any bin varies from 0-14.lets consider markers which will divide the line into 4 parts. So we require 3 markers which can divide the line as follows

part1 Marker1 part2 marker2 part 3 marker3 part4

For this we have 16 places to place the markers

III-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I-

In case the marker is placed as

III- - - - - - - - - - - - - -
we have all the 14 balls in the 4th bin and none in the other 3

When its like
II-I - - - - - - - - - - - - -
There are 13 balls in the 4th bin and 1 ball in the 3rd bin

so the 3 markers can be placed in the 16 places in 16C3 ways

In other words the balls can be dropped in 4 different bins in 16C3 ways


I guess it should by 17C3, 14 balls + 3 markers.... Isn't it?


Thanks for the heads up. I had got the solution wrong. Do check the corrected solution.
_________________

When you feel like giving up, remember why you held on for so long in the first place.

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Feb 2013
Posts: 375
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
GPA: 3.3
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 52 [0], given: 326

CAT Tests
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 18 May 2013, 08:33
Bunuel wrote:
Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests

Get quick access to the GMAT Club tests!

Have you done thousands of questions and dream about them at night? Take a shot of creating your own!

We are going to release a new version/next gen of the tests this summer and would like to get some questions into the pool.


The opportunity:


Post your DS or PS questions in this thread and we will give you 5 kudos. Once you get 25 kudos (5 questions or 4 questions and profile update) are enough to get access to GMAT Club tests for 3 months!


Hi Bunuel,

Any idea when the access to the GMAT Club tests will be granted and can you please let me know which tests I can access? I have taken some free tests and those are really good.

Thanks
_________________

Thanks,
Kinjal
Never Give Up !!!

Please click on Kudos, if you think the post is helpful
Linkedin Handle : https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=116231592

Director
Director
User avatar
Status: My Thread Master Bschool Threads-->Krannert(Purdue),WP Carey(Arizona),Foster(Uwashngton)
Joined: 27 Jun 2011
Posts: 894
Followers: 62

Kudos [?]: 157 [0], given: 57

GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 18 May 2013, 22:19
Bunuel wrote:
Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests

Get quick access to the GMAT Club tests!

Have you done thousands of questions and dream about them at night? Take a shot of creating your own!

We are going to release a new version/next gen of the tests this summer and would like to get some questions into the pool.


The opportunity:


Post your DS or PS questions in this thread and we will give you 5 kudos. Once you get 25 kudos (5 questions or 4 questions and profile update) are enough to get access to GMAT Club tests for 3 months!


Terms & Conditions:


  • Your question has to be unique and not copyrighted by anyone else. If you choose to use a text or passage of text you must paraphrase it or modify it to the point that we will not be able to trace it or otherwise your question will be disqualified.
  • We reserve the right to make the final judgement about acceptance or disqualification of the questions
  • To be considered, each question must be posted in this thread according to the rules (rules-for-posting-please-read-this-before-posting-133935.html)
  • If your question is accepted, you will have to write an explanation to it before you will get kudos
  • Any difficulty is accepted at this time (600, 700, 750+ level)
  • By posting in this thread and on this forum you release any copyright rights to the questions/work you may produce and allow GMAT Club to publish any material as needed


Yes even i want to know this...I believe noone is giving 5 kudos here which will grant access to GCtests .
_________________

General GMAT useful links-->

Indian Bschools Accepting Gmat | My Gmat Daily Diary | All Gmat Practice CAT's | MBA Ranking 2013 | How to Convert Indian GPA/ Percentage to US 4 pt. GPA scale | GMAT MATH BOOK in downloadable PDF format| POWERSCORE CRITICAL REASONING BIBLE - FULL CHAPTER NOTES | Result correlation between GMAT and GMAT Club's Tests | Best GMAT Stories - Period!

More useful links-->

GMAT Prep Software Analysis and What If Scenarios| GMAT and MBA 101|Everything You Need to Prepare for the GMAT|New to the GMAT Club? <START HERE>|GMAT ToolKit: iPhone/iPod/iPad/Android application|

Verbal Treasure Hunt-->

"Ultimate" Study Plan for Verbal on the GMAT|Books to Read (Improve Verbal Score and Enjoy a Good Read)|Best Verbal GMAT Books 2012|Carcass Best EXTERNAL resources to tackle the GMAT Verbal Section|Ultimate GMAT Grammar Book from GC club [Free Download]|Ultimate Sentence Correction Encyclopedia|Souvik's The Most Comprehensive Collection Of Everything Official-SC|ALL SC Rules+Official Qs by Experts & Legendary Club Members|Meaning/Clarity SC Question Bank by Carcass_Souvik|Critical Reasoning Shortcuts and Tips|Critical Reasoning Megathread!|The Most Comprehensive Collection Of Everything Official- CR|GMAT Club's Reading Comprehension Strategy Guide|The Most Comprehensive Collection Of Everything Official- RC|Ultimate Reading Comprehension Encyclopedia|ALL RC Strategy+Official Q by Experts&Legendary Club Members

----
---
--
-


1 KUDOS = 1 THANK


Kick Ass Gmat

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Feb 2013
Posts: 375
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
GPA: 3.3
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Followers: 2

Kudos [?]: 52 [0], given: 326

CAT Tests
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 18 May 2013, 23:57
One of my favorite question :-D

A and B complete a piece of the task together in D days. A takes 9 days more than the days he will take to complete the task on his own and B takes 4 more days that he would take if he completes the task on his own. What is the value of D?

A) 13
B) 6
C) 4.77
D) 12
E) 15

[Reveal] Spoiler:
There is one concept I want to discuss here:

Lets say A takes a days and B takes b days to complete the work.

Together they will take ab/(a+b) days to complete the work.

The difference between the days taken by A alone and days taken when A and B worked together = a - ab/(a+b) = a^2/(a+b)
Similarly difference of days in case of B = b^2/(a+b)

So if the difference is given, then the combined days can be obtained as sqrt (product of diffrence) = sqrt(a^2*b^2/(a+b)^2) = ab/(a+b)

Applying the formula, the combined number of days are sqrt(9*4) = 6 days

_________________

Thanks,
Kinjal
Never Give Up !!!

Please click on Kudos, if you think the post is helpful
Linkedin Handle : https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=116231592

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 15 Sep 2011
Posts: 182
Location: United States
Concentration: Finance, International Business
WE: Corporate Finance (Manufacturing)
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 75 [0], given: 5

CAT Tests
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 01 Jun 2013, 20:17
If x, y, and z are non-zero numbers, is \frac{x}{y} an integer?

(1) z=\frac{154\pi}{y}

(2) x=\frac{49\pi^2}{z}


[Reveal] Spoiler:
A number that can be expressed as a ratio of two numbers is rational. However, roots, \pi, and endless non-repeating decimals are irrational numbers; they cannot be written in a ratio of two numbers.

(1) expression is not sufficient, need x
(2) expression is not sufficient, need y

(1) (2) expression reduces to \frac{7\pi}{22}. \frac{22}{7} is commonly used to approximate \pi, yet \frac{22}{7}\neq\pi. Thus, \frac{x}{y} is not an integer.

The correct answer is C

_________________

A little kudos never hurt anyone. :)

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 15 Sep 2011
Posts: 182
Location: United States
Concentration: Finance, International Business
WE: Corporate Finance (Manufacturing)
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 75 [0], given: 5

CAT Tests
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests [#permalink] New post 01 Jun 2013, 20:22
If t is an integer, what is t?

(1) t^t -1 is not positive

(2) t! \neq 0


[Reveal] Spoiler:
(1) If t^t-1 is not positive, then t\leq0. t can be any odd negative integer or 0. Not sufficient
(2) If t! \neq 0, then t can still be any positive integer. Not sufficient

(1) (2) If t^t -1 is not negative and t! \neq 0, then t=0.
0^0 - 1 = 0 and 0! = 1. Sufficient

Therefore, the correct answer is C.

_________________

A little kudos never hurt anyone. :)


Last edited by mejia401 on 02 Jun 2013, 09:56, edited 1 time in total.
Re: Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests   [#permalink] 01 Jun 2013, 20:22
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
1 Experts publish their posts in the topic Get GMAT Club Test Questions for a Fraction of the Price bb 5 05 Sep 2014, 10:51
5 Experts publish their posts in the topic Submit Your Own Verbal Questions - Get Kudos Reward MacFauz 14 29 Sep 2013, 07:00
GMAT CLUB TEST QUESTION tradinggenius 1 17 Jan 2011, 23:09
question on GMAT club test yufenshi 0 25 Nov 2010, 15:55
Questionable solution to a GMAT club test problem (Math # 8) snatekar 3 30 May 2009, 01:22
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Submit Your Own GMAT Math Questions - Get GMAT Club Tests

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4    Next  [ 64 posts ] 



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.