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Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong

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Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2006, 15:17
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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100% (01:38) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 11 sessions
Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong electromagnetic activity, are visible as dark spots on the surface of the Sun but have never been sighted on the Sun’s poles or equator.

(A) are visible as dark spots on the surface of the Sun but have never been sighted on
(B) are visible as dark spots that never have been sighted on the surface of the Sun
(C) appear on the surface of the Sun as dark spots although never sighted at
(D) appear as dark spots on the surface of the Sun, although never having been sighted at
(E) appear as dark spots on the Sun’s surface, which have never been sighted on
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2006, 19:59
A should be the correct answer.

Option C and D sound odd with the word “atâ€
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2006, 20:02
[quote="jaynayak"]A should be the correct answer.

Option C and D sound odd with the word “atâ€
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2006, 20:06
[quote="jaynayak"]A should be the correct answer.

Option C and D sound odd with the word “atâ€
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2006, 20:26
I think have never been seen is correct.

Consider never been together and I feel it makes an adverb.
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 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2006, 20:28
I think 'sighted at' is correct w.r.t 'Sun’s poles or equator'.

So A, B and E are out.

Between C and D, I would go with C.

So IMO it is C.

However, I feel we are missing 'never been sighted' in C.

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 [#permalink] New post 28 Apr 2006, 01:10
I go with C too

I think "sighted at " goes with location and
"sighted on" goes with something else like date/time !!

For example,
She was sighted at Disneyland on April 28th.
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2006, 12:49
OA is C
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 [#permalink] New post 30 May 2006, 02:19
remgeo wrote:
I go with C too

I think "sighted at " goes with location and
"sighted on" goes with something else like date/time !!

For example,
She was sighted at Disneyland on April 28th.



I googled both "sighted on" and "at" and both give about 220.000 results.


Here are few of the many examples where "sighted on" is used also for location.
'Champ' Sighted On Lake Champlain 16 Times In 2000
Pro Evo 5 sighted on Xbox 360?
Proven Guilty sighted on store shelves!
Dolphin sighted on M6 Toll!


It means both are idiomatic and there are other reasons why C is better than A. I too chosed A, because something is missing between although and sighted : "appear ..., although never sighted."

Has someone another brillant ideas? :P
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 [#permalink] New post 30 May 2006, 03:12
karlfurt wrote:
remgeo wrote:
I go with C too

I think "sighted at " goes with location and
"sighted on" goes with something else like date/time !!

For example,
She was sighted at Disneyland on April 28th.



I googled both "sighted on" and "at" and both give about 220.000 results.


Here are few of the many examples where "sighted on" is used also for location.
'Champ' Sighted On Lake Champlain 16 Times In 2000
Pro Evo 5 sighted on Xbox 360?
Proven Guilty sighted on store shelves!
Dolphin sighted on M6 Toll!


It means both are idiomatic and there are other reasons why C is better than A. I too chosed A, because something is missing between although and sighted : "appear ..., although never sighted."

Has someone another brillant ideas? :P



Confusion is related to prepositions "At", "On" and "In".
Just to brush up the concept:
Prepositions differ according to the number of dimensions they refer to:

Point
Prepositions in this group indicate that the noun that follows them is treated as a point in relation to which another object is positioned.

Surface
Prepositions in this group indicate that the position of an object is defined with respect to a surface on which it rests.

Area/Volume
Prepositions in this group indicate that an object lies within the boundaries of an area or within the confines of a volume.

In light of these descriptions, at, on, and in can be classified as follows:
at ....... point
on ....... surface
in ....... area/volume

"At" calls for further comment.
Because it is the least specific of the prepositions in its spatial orientation, it has a great variety of uses.
Here are some of them:

location
Tom is waiting for his sister at the bank.

destination
We arrived at the house.

direction
The policeman leaped at the assailant.

To know more click below link:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/ ... prep2.html


Regards,
Brajesh
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 [#permalink] New post 30 May 2006, 03:16
A and B are not good. We want to say the sunspots appear on the surface of the sun in the form of dark spots. This is done in C,D and E where it says 'appear .... as...'

Next, D and E are out as we should say the sunspots appear on... (or whatever preposition is appropriate)

I think C is good, although it sounds a little awkward just reading it.
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 [#permalink] New post 30 May 2006, 04:35
b14kumar wrote:


Confusion is related to prepositions "At", "On" and "In".
Just to brush up the concept:
Prepositions differ according to the number of dimensions they refer to:

Point
Prepositions in this group indicate that the noun that follows them is treated as a point in relation to which another object is positioned.

Surface
Prepositions in this group indicate that the position of an object is defined with respect to a surface on which it rests.

Area/Volume
Prepositions in this group indicate that an object lies within the boundaries of an area or within the confines of a volume.

In light of these descriptions, at, on, and in can be classified as follows:
at ....... point
on ....... surface
in ....... area/volume

"At" calls for further comment.
Because it is the least specific of the prepositions in its spatial orientation, it has a great variety of uses.
Here are some of them:

location
Tom is waiting for his sister at the bank.

destination
We arrived at the house.

direction
The policeman leaped at the assailant.

To know more click below link:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/ ... prep2.html


Regards,
Brajesh


That's a very good and useful explanation, thanks!
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 [#permalink] New post 30 May 2006, 11:02
OA is C
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 [#permalink] New post 30 May 2006, 11:09
karlfurt wrote:
remgeo wrote:
I go with C too

I think "sighted at " goes with location and
"sighted on" goes with something else like date/time !!

For example,
She was sighted at Disneyland on April 28th.



I googled both "sighted on" and "at" and both give about 220.000 results.


Here are few of the many examples where "sighted on" is used also for location.
'Champ' Sighted On Lake Champlain 16 Times In 2000
Pro Evo 5 sighted on Xbox 360?
Proven Guilty sighted on store shelves!
Dolphin sighted on M6 Toll!


It means both are idiomatic and there are other reasons why C is better than A. I too chosed A, because something is missing between although and sighted : "appear ..., although never sighted."

Has someone another brillant ideas? :P



"I googled both "sighted on" and "at" and both give about 220.000 results."


You are the man... :?

anyhow one more A...
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Nov 2006, 16:01
The OA is A from the OG11

below are their explainations

A) Correct. This sentence clearly and correctly draws a contrast between where sunspots are found and where they are not.

B) changing the modifying clause so that that never ... sun distorts the meaning of the sentence; the contrast is lost.

C) Although typically introduces a subordinate clause, which has a subject and a verb, but here there is no subject and sighted is not a complete verb

D) Although typically introduces a subordinate clause, which has a subject and a verb, but here there is no subject of the clause and having been sighted is not a complete verb phrase.

E) The relative pronoun which should immediately follow its referent; here which illogically follows surface and its intended referent, either sunspot or dark spots, becomes unclear.

----------------------------------------------------------------

I am actually doing this out of the Manhattan GMAT prep but how is
are visible as ......but never been sighted... parallel??!?! I thought parallelism requires almost identical structure.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Nov 2006, 17:21
OA is A...its in OG11 as stated earlier...im looking at the answer in front of me right now
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Nov 2006, 03:29
This is a question from OG 11( Q. number 9) and answer is A.
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2007, 05:03
phew, thankgoodness for this club. I went for A and could not understand how C could be right as stated in the SC1000.
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2007, 05:32
I picked A and wondered why C. Good that it was spotted in OG!
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 [#permalink] New post 21 Jan 2007, 23:35
yup OA is A according to OG. I found that here many sentences give wrong OA, which is very dangerous!
  [#permalink] 21 Jan 2007, 23:35
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