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Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong

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Re: Sunspots [#permalink] New post 28 Nov 2010, 14:51
A is correct as it provides for full subject verb agreement. Option c does not provide a clear response with sighted at. I believe if that was replaced with "sighted on" we could use option c.
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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 13 Sep 2012, 22:15
Hi,

I have one confusion here about the option E.

spots on sun's surface, which have .. --> "which have" clearly refers to spots (plural) rather than sun's surface (singular). Also, grammar says:
In "x preposition y, which ..", "which" would refer to the most logically connecting & grammatically correct noun of X & Y. So, E shd be right. Please help me understand why it is not so.

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Re: Sunspots [#permalink] New post 14 Nov 2012, 22:13
bigoyal wrote:
I'll vote for C.

(A) are visible as dark spots on the surface of the Sun but have never been sighted on - "are visible" and "have never been" are not parallel.
(B) are visible as dark spots that never have been sighted on the surface of the Sun - "dark spots that never have been sighted" sounds awkward and changes the meaning.
(C) appear on the surface of the Sun as dark spots although never sighted at - "sunspots .. appear..." and "sunspots.. sighted.." are parallel construction
(D) appear as dark spots on the surface of the Sun, although never having been sighted at - "although never having been" sounds awkward and wordy. Also not parallel to "appear as"
(E) appear as dark spots on the Sun's surface, which have never been sighted on - same error as D


Though the OA is A, can anyone please explain how active voice and passive voice are parallel in choice A. since "and" indicate parallelism and both parts preceding and following "and" should be parallel in structure and logic..."are visible ---active voice and have never been ---passive"..plz correct me if i m wrong.
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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 15 Nov 2012, 19:36
Sentence sounds pretty good to me. Double-check: eliminate B for seemingly changing the meaning, eliminate C for although never sighted, eliminate D for although never having been.

So A or E. I'm going to stick with A as E somewhat changes the meaning.

Last edited by vandygrad11 on 27 Mar 2013, 08:29, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 25 Nov 2012, 09:26
skim wrote:
Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong electromagnetic activity, are visible as dark spots on the surface of the Sun but have never been sighted on the Sun’s poles or equater.

(A) are visible as dark spots on the surface of the Sun but have never been sighted on
(B) are visible as dark spots that never have been sighted on the surface of the Sun
(C) appear on the surface of the Sun as dark spots although never sighted at
(D) appear as dark spots on the surface of the Sun, although never having been sighted at
(E) appear as dark spots on the Sun's surface, which have never been sighted on


"don't lose contradiction meaning" - B and E out
"sight at" not "on"- A,B,E out
"which" can't refer to surface - E out
"although" requires complete S+A + "having been" means action before another action or after finishing one action something new started - D out.
"action verb" > "stationary be + adj/active noun" - A,B out

The best option should be "although the spots have never been sighted at"
POE gives C.
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Re: Sunspots [#permalink] New post 02 Apr 2013, 01:35
buffaloboy wrote:
bigoyal wrote:
I'll vote for C.

(A) are visible as dark spots on the surface of the Sun but have never been sighted on - "are visible" and "have never been" are not parallel.
(B) are visible as dark spots that never have been sighted on the surface of the Sun - "dark spots that never have been sighted" sounds awkward and changes the meaning.
(C) appear on the surface of the Sun as dark spots although never sighted at - "sunspots .. appear..." and "sunspots.. sighted.." are parallel construction
(D) appear as dark spots on the surface of the Sun, although never having been sighted at - "although never having been" sounds awkward and wordy. Also not parallel to "appear as"
(E) appear as dark spots on the Sun's surface, which have never been sighted on - same error as D


Though the OA is A, can anyone please explain how active voice and passive voice are parallel in choice A. since "and" indicate parallelism and both parts preceding and following "and" should be parallel in structure and logic..."are visible ---active voice and have never been ---passive"..plz correct me if i m wrong.


Can anyone explain plz........
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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 02 Apr 2013, 01:59
Quote:
Can anyone explain plz........


what is the doubt here ?
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Re: Sunspots [#permalink] New post 02 Apr 2013, 12:22
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Quote:
Though the OA is A, can anyone please explain how active voice and passive voice are parallel in choice A. since "and" indicate parallelism and both parts preceding and following "and" should be parallel in structure and logic..."are visible ---active voice and have never been ---passive"..plz correct me if i m wrong.

Pretty interesting query. The doubt in this question really is - can active voice be parallel to passive voice?
I will explain this using a different question and then will look forward to you applying this logic to the question in this thread.

Another Official Sentence


Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, the first woman to draw a soldier’s pension, joined the Continental Army in 1782 at the age of 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become too ill to serve.

Doubt raised
Although the above sentence is correct, 'joined' , ' was injured' , and 'was discharged' do not seem parallel to me.

Doubt Clarification


Active voice can be parallel to passive voice.

In this sentence we have three actions related to Deborah:
1) Deborah joined
2) Deborah was injured
3) Deborah was discharged

Thus here, active verbs are parallel to passive verbs. Logically, the above is the only way we can express these. If we were to make everything in active voice, then we will lose the preciseness and effectiveness of the sentence: “Deborah joined the army; enemies injured her; army discharged her...”. This is highly complex and not effective at all.

Thus, active verbs can very well be parallel to passive verbs when the context requires!

Now say we have a sentence:
Mouse ran up the clock, and water spout was climbed by the spider.

This sentence is not parallel since the two clauses do not have logically parallel subjects because of use of different voice. It should be made parallel as follows:
Mouse ran up the clock, and spider climbed the water spout.

Here is one more sentence:
Mary cooked elaborate dinner, which was indulged by all the guests.
This sentence is correct as is: First part is active voice and second part - which clause is in passive construction.

Thus, it really depends on the context of the sentence if active voice can be made parallel to passive voice. The end goal is to communicate the idea in the most effective manner.

I hope this helps. Now apply the same logic to the Sunspots question. :)

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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2013, 21:39
Expert's post
Of course, the OA is A.
however, there still are some doubts.OG said 'although never sighted' in C and 'having been sighted' in D are unidiomatic because of 'Although typically introduces a subordinate clause, which has a subject and a verb.' rather than because of changes in meaning.
i think although X, Y= X, but Y= X but Y≠X, although Y, so C and D change the meaning. am i right? Is the ommiting of the Subject and Verb in the although clauses OK?
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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2013, 09:33
skim wrote:
Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong electromagnetic activity, are visible as dark spots on the surface of the Sun but have never been sighted on the Sun’s poles or equater.

(A) are visible as dark spots on the surface of the Sun but have never been sighted on
(B) are visible as dark spots that never have been sighted on the surface of the Sun
(C) appear on the surface of the Sun as dark spots although never sighted at
(D) appear as dark spots on the surface of the Sun, although never having been sighted at
(E) appear as dark spots on the Sun's surface, which have never been sighted on




This is Q14 of the OG 12th ed. (Q9 of the OG 11th ed) However:

1. I don't understand the OE of option (C), in that "sighted is not a complete verb".

2. I don't understand the OE of the top paragraph which states "The adjective visible is a complement and is parallel to the past particle sighted"

Would appreciate any form of explanation. Thanks


When payed with A it leaves the errors corrected in D (and E tried) though D is right by idiom, snappy English and hey not everything can be consummated n Active tense don't get obsessed with it do..
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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 10 Jul 2013, 10:39
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this qestion also appears in OG12 #14. Of course, the OA is A.
however, there still are some doubts.OG said 'although never sighted' in C and 'having been sighted' in D are unidiomatic because of 'Although typically introduces a subordinate clause, which has a subject and a verb.' rather than because of changes in meaning.
i think although X, Y= X, but Y= X but Y≠X, although Y, so C and D change the meaning. am i right? Is the ommiting of the Subject and Verb in the although clauses


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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2013, 07:05
The correct parallel structure in the original sentence emphasizes the contrast between where sunspots are found {are visible... Sun) and where they are not {have never been sighted... equator). Sunspots is the subject of the sentence; are is the verb of the first part of the contrast, and have been sighted is the verb of the second. (The adjective visible is a complement and is parallel to the past participle sighted) Both parts of the sentence conclude with phrases indicating location.The contrast itself is indicated by the conjunction but.

A Correct. This sentence clearly and correctly draws a contrast between where sunspots are found and where they are not.
B The modifying clause that never... Sun distorts the meaning of the sentence; also,without punctuation, the phrase on the surface of the Sun the Suns poles or equator is ungrammatical and makes no sense.
C Although typically introduces a subordinate clause, which has a subject and a verb,but here there is no subject and "sighted' is not a complete verb.
D Although usually introduces a subordinate clause,but there is no subject of the clause and having been sighted is not a complete verb phrase.
E This phrasing makes the sentence somewhat awkward and unclear.
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Re: Sunspots [#permalink] New post 20 Jul 2013, 10:00
noboru wrote:
That makes total sense to me.
However, according to my source, OA is C.

Thoughts?



What is your source that you are referring to?
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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 10 Aug 2013, 16:09
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(A) works fine here. The sentence structure here is:

"Sunspots are visible as [x] but have never been sighted on [Y]."
Here it doesn't make sense to compare "dark spots on" to "sighted on" simply because it doesn't fit into the framework appropriate for this particular sentence structure.
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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 08 Sep 2013, 21:56
In rejection of (C). OG13 mentions

'Although typically introduces a subordinate
clause, which has a subject and a verb'



Eg: Although eagerly waiting to die, john has no illness that can accomplish his wish.

Is the above sentence incorrect?

I am stating this doubt because somewhere I have seen although preceding a modifier.

Please enlighten me !!
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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 30 Sep 2013, 09:57
TGC wrote:
In rejection of (C). OG13 mentions

'Although typically introduces a subordinate
clause, which has a subject and a verb'



Eg: Although eagerly waiting to die, john has no illness that can accomplish his wish.

Is the above sentence incorrect?

I am stating this doubt because somewhere I have seen although preceding a modifier.

Please enlighten me !!


Even I have the same doubt . What is wrong with option C?
Is it only because A maintains llsm and is thus better choice ?

Given below is the question in which although is used but without subject and verb

Polio, although it is eradicated in the United States, it continues elsewhere and is able to be brought into the country by visitors.

(A) Polio, although it is eradicated in the United States, it continues elsewhere and is able to be
(B) Polio, although eradicated in the United States, it still continues elsewhere and can be
(C) Although still continuing elsewhere, polio has been eradicated in the United States and could be
(D) Although having been eradicated in the United States, polio still continues elsewhere and is capable of being
(E) Although eradicated in the United States, polio continues elsewhere and could be
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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2013, 08:02
In option C appear is an adjective or a verb? :?:
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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2013, 09:02
18.kartik wrote:
In option C appear is an adjective or a verb? :?:


As I understand Sunspots is the subject and appear is verb .
Why do you think that appear is a modifier ( adjective ) ?
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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2013, 23:43
I would like to point out at the split between “are visible as” and “appear”. There is a slight shift of meaning in the sense that the sun spots do not appear as dark spots on the Sun’s surface (and then disappear as something else) or seem to be dark spots( appear has multiple meanings) rather they are visible as dark spots ( from the earth). In any case visible wins over appear. Having said this, I do have a problem with “on the Sun’s poles or equator” I prefer it to be “at the Sun’s poles or on the equator”
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Re: Sunspots, vortices of gas associated with strong [#permalink] New post 02 Dec 2013, 03:00
c and d are wrong because

the phrase "although sighted" and "although having been sighted" modifies the main clause and refer to subject of the main clause. because the phrase refers to the subject of main clause, it must be close to the subject.

although tired, I learn gmat for many hours per days

I learn gmat for many hours per days , although tired

the second sentence is not prefered on gmat.

please, look at the discussion on beatthegmat forum about this problem.

there is no problem of meaning in c and d. the problem in c and d is PREFERENCE.
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