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Sven: Trade unions are traditionally regarded by governments

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Senior Manager
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Sven: Trade unions are traditionally regarded by governments [#permalink] New post 11 Aug 2004, 10:18
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A
B
C
D
E

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(N/A)

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15. Sven: Trade unions are traditionally regarded by governments and economists as restraints of trade, working against the complete freedom of the economy, but I believe that unions are indispensable since they are often the worker’s only protection against exploitation.

Ravi: I don’t agree. The exploitation of the workers and their work is a normal part of ordinary trade just like the exploitation of natural or other material resources.

Sven and Ravi will not be able to resolve their disagreement logically unless they

(A) define a key term
(B) rely on the opinions of established authorities
(C) question an unproved premise
(D) present supporting data
(E) distinguish fact from opinion

How to approach these problems ?
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Aug 2004, 10:29
I think it was recently discussed.


A
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Aug 2004, 10:31
Answer is E.

This is a perfect question for 'heartstring' technique.

Both the opinions stated by Sven and Ravi are very good heart strings to readers. To solve the argument betwen Sven and Ravi LOGICALLY, we need facts and not opinions.

D is wrong because providing supporting data to opinions is not going to be of any use.
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Aug 2004, 10:33
http://www.gmatclub.com/phpbb/viewtopic ... ade+unions

This link explains the idea well.

A is the right answer

Reason :
Unless the key term 'exploitation' is defined by these two guys, they would never be able to solve their argument
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Aug 2004, 10:42
I think itz E.
What is the 'heartstring technique'?
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Aug 2004, 18:59
'Heartstring' is a phrase used by Princeton Review to explain such questions.

Some sentences/CR takes provides information which are viewed by a reader with his opinion impossed on the topic.

for eg : Julia Roberts is very beautiful.

Now, this sentence states something which is of common knowledge. The paragraph may not state this information. But since this is a common knowledge to us, we tend to get pulled to this answer choice.

Princeton Review calls this as 'heartstrings'. Hope my explanation was worth while. Thanks
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 [#permalink] New post 12 Aug 2004, 19:37
Thanks Krish. That was a good piece of info. :thanks
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Jun 2006, 22:51
Why cant this be D??

Should he not prove the premise that exploitation of workers is needed for the company to do well..

I am not sure... if I agree with A..
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jun 2006, 00:43
Straight forward A.

The key term here is exploitation.
Ravi and Sven use exploitation with two different phenomenon. Unless they agree the to the definitionof exploitation, they won't be able to resolve their differences.
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jun 2006, 23:56
A , in my opinion. They need to agree what "exploitation" of workers and resources is.
  [#permalink] 09 Jun 2006, 23:56
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