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The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and

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The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and [#permalink] New post 03 Mar 2013, 13:49
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Question Stats:

51% (01:46) correct 49% (01:11) wrong based on 89 sessions
The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and so inflexible that they refuse to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when justifiable.

(A)they refuse to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when
(B)it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when it is
(C)it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences to be taken even when they are
(D)permitting leaves of absences is not discussed even when
(E)discussion of permitting leaves of absences is refused even when they will be

Need explanation...................
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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Re: The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and [#permalink] New post 04 Mar 2013, 11:04
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mun23 wrote:
The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and so inflexible that they refuse to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when justifiable.
(A) they refuse to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when
(B) it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when it is
(C) it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences to be taken even when they are
(D) permitting leaves of absences is not discussed even when
(E) discussion of permitting leaves of absences is refused even when they will be

Need explanation...................

I'm happy to help. :-)

Classic pronoun issues. The subject, "board", is singular, and correctly has the singular verb "follows" ---- even though this board presumably is made up multiple people, those people are not mentioned explicitly, and therefore it is 100% illegal to use a plural pronoun referring to them. To refer to the board, we must use a singular pronoun. That's why (A) is dead wrong.

(D) & (E) are horrible weak & wordy passive constructions. The GMAT generally does not approve of passive constructions when something active is possible. Here's a blog on this issue:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/active-vs- ... -the-gmat/

Another issue with (A) & (D) --- the GMAT SC doesn't like the construction [

(B) contains another pronoun issue --- "leaves of absence" is plural, and (B) uses the singular pronoun "it" to refer to them.

Choice (C) gets all the pronoun correct, and it is active, direct, and powerful. It is the best answer.

Does all this make sense?

Mike :-)
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Mike McGarry
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Re: The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and [#permalink] New post 04 Mar 2013, 14:23
mikemcgarry wrote:
mun23 wrote:
The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and so inflexible that they refuse to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when justifiable.
(A) they refuse to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when
(B) it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when it is
(C) it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences to be taken even when they are
(D) permitting leaves of absences is not discussed even when
(E) discussion of permitting leaves of absences is refused even when they will be

Need explanation...................

I'm happy to help. :-)

Classic pronoun issues. The subject, "board", is singular, and correctly has the singular verb "follows" ---- even though this board presumably is made up multiple people, those people are not mentioned explicitly, and therefore it is 100% illegal to use a plural pronoun referring to them. To refer to the board, we must use a singular pronoun. That's why (A) is dead wrong.

(D) & (E) are horrible weak & wordy passive constructions. The GMAT generally does not approve of passive constructions when something active is possible. Here's a blog on this issue:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/active-vs- ... -the-gmat/

Another issue with (A) & (D) --- the GMAT SC doesn't like the construction [

(B) contains another pronoun issue --- "leaves of absence" is plural, and (B) uses the singular pronoun "it" to refer to them.

Choice (C) gets all the pronoun correct, and it is active, direct, and powerful. It is the best answer.

Does all this make sense?

Mike :-)

Hi Mike
whats the problem with sentence A&D`s construction...............Whats the use of "even when"

Whats the difference between even when justifiable and even when it is justifiable ?
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Re: The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and [#permalink] New post 04 Mar 2013, 15:02
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Expert's post
mun23 wrote:
The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and so inflexible that they refuse to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when justifiable.
(A) they refuse to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when
(B) it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when it is
(C) it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences to be taken even when they are
(D) permitting leaves of absences is not discussed even when
(E) discussion of permitting leaves of absences is refused even when they will be


Hi Mike
whats the problem with sentence A&D`s construction...............Whats the use of "even when"

Whats the difference between even when justifiable and even when it is justifiable?

Dear mun23 ----
I'm sorry, I was interrupted in the middle of writing that, and I completely forget to explain that section. My apologies.

The word "when" is a subordinate conjunction --- its role is to introduce a subordinate clause. Like any clause, a subordinate clause has a full [noun]+[verb] that, without the word when, could stand on its own as a complete sentence. Thus, the construction "when it is justifiable" is perfectly correct, because we have a full [noun]+[verb] clause following the word when --- the clause "it is justifiable" could stand on its own as a complete [noun]+[verb] sentence.

The GMAT does not approve of the structure [subordinate conjunction]+[adjective]:
= when justified
= when ready
= although tired
= while hesitant
etc. etc.
These are very common in colloquial American speech, but they do not conform to the formal standards of the GMAT. Choices (A) & (D) make this mistake.

Does that make sense?

Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Status: struggling with GMAT
Joined: 06 Dec 2012
Posts: 307
Location: Bangladesh
Concentration: Accounting
GMAT Date: 04-06-2013
GPA: 3.65
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 101 [0], given: 46

Re: The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and [#permalink] New post 04 Mar 2013, 15:24
mikemcgarry wrote:
mun23 wrote:
The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and so inflexible that they refuse to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when justifiable.
(A) they refuse to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when
(B) it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when it is
(C) it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences to be taken even when they are
(D) permitting leaves of absences is not discussed even when
(E) discussion of permitting leaves of absences is refused even when they will be


Hi Mike
whats the problem with sentence A&D`s construction...............Whats the use of "even when"

Whats the difference between even when justifiable and even when it is justifiable?

Dear mun23 ----
I'm sorry, I was interrupted in the middle of writing that, and I completely forget to explain that section. My apologies.

The word "when" is a subordinate conjunction --- its role is to introduce a subordinate clause. Like any clause, a subordinate clause has a full [noun]+[verb] that, without the word when, could stand on its own as a complete sentence. Thus, the construction "when it is justifiable" is perfectly correct, because we have a full [noun]+[verb] clause following the word when --- the clause "it is justifiable" could stand on its own as a complete [noun]+[verb] sentence.

The GMAT does not approve of the structure [subordinate conjunction]+[adjective]:
= when justified
= when ready
= although tired
= while hesitant
etc. etc.
These are very common in colloquial American speech, but they do not conform to the formal standards of the GMAT. Choices (A) & (D) make this mistake.

Does that make sense?

Mike :-)

Hi Mike
1 kudos for you.thanks for explanation
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Re: The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and [#permalink] New post 17 Oct 2013, 23:23
mikemcgarry wrote:
mun23 wrote:
The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and so inflexible that they refuse to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when justifiable.
(A) they refuse to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when
(B) it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when it is
(C) it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences to be taken even when they are
(D) permitting leaves of absences is not discussed even when
(E) discussion of permitting leaves of absences is refused even when they will be


Hi Mike
whats the problem with sentence A&D`s construction...............Whats the use of "even when"

Whats the difference between even when justifiable and even when it is justifiable?

Dear mun23 ----
I'm sorry, I was interrupted in the middle of writing that, and I completely forget to explain that section. My apologies.

The word "when" is a subordinate conjunction --- its role is to introduce a subordinate clause. Like any clause, a subordinate clause has a full [noun]+[verb] that, without the word when, could stand on its own as a complete sentence. Thus, the construction "when it is justifiable" is perfectly correct, because we have a full [noun]+[verb] clause following the word when --- the clause "it is justifiable" could stand on its own as a complete [noun]+[verb] sentence.

The GMAT does not approve of the structure [subordinate conjunction]+[adjective]:
= when justified
= when ready
= although tired
= while hesitant
etc. etc.
These are very common in colloquial American speech, but they do not conform to the formal standards of the GMAT. Choices (A) & (D) make this mistake.

Does that make sense?

Mike :-)


Hi mike
C) it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences to be taken even when they are
Choice C is the best answer. But isn't permitting and to be taken redundant?

Thanks in advance.
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Re: The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and [#permalink] New post 18 Oct 2013, 09:27
Expert's post
domfrancondumas wrote:
Hi mike
C) it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences to be taken even when they are
Choice C is the best answer. But isn't permitting and to be taken redundant?

Thanks in advance.

Dear domfrancondumas

I'm happy to help. :-)

It's true that if we just had ...
(1) The board doesn't permit leaves of absence
(2) The board doesn't permit leaves of absence to be taken.
... then maybe we could argue that the extra phrase would be redundant and/or unnecessary. In this stripped down version, it's not perfectly clear, but one could make an argument that the phrase is redundant. BUT, we always must consider the full context of the sentence. Here's version (C):

(C) The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and so inflexible that it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences to be taken even when they are justifiable.

In this sentence we want to say that the board "refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences", and then we want to emphasize that it refuses discussing them even when these leaves of absences are justifiable. Consider version (C) without the words "to be taken" ---

(C') The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and so inflexible that it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when they are justifiable.

Hmmm. When it is justifiable to discuss the leave? When it is justifiable to permit the leave? When it is justifiable to take the leave? The "to be taken" makes crystal clear exactly what about the leaves is justifiable. Is this clarification necessary? Maybe, maybe not, but the fact that there's even a question about whether it could be necessary means that including it cannot be dismissed a redundant because the phrase may be serving a necessarily clarifying purpose for someone.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and [#permalink] New post 18 Oct 2013, 09:49
mikemcgarry wrote:
domfrancondumas wrote:
Hi mike
C) it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences to be taken even when they are
Choice C is the best answer. But isn't permitting and to be taken redundant?

Thanks in advance.

Dear domfrancondumas

I'm happy to help. :-)

It's true that if we just had ...
(1) The board doesn't permit leaves of absence
(2) The board doesn't permit leaves of absence to be taken.
... then maybe we could argue that the extra phrase would be redundant and/or unnecessary. In this stripped down version, it's not perfectly clear, but one could make an argument that the phrase is redundant. BUT, we always must consider the full context of the sentence. Here's version (C):

(C) The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and so inflexible that it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences to be taken even when they are justifiable.

In this sentence we want to say that the board "refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences", and then we want to emphasize that it refuses discussing them even when these leaves of absences are justifiable. Consider version (C) without the words "to be taken" ---

(C') The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and so inflexible that it refuses to discuss permitting leaves of absences even when they are justifiable.

Hmmm. When it is justifiable to discuss the leave? When it is justifiable to permit the leave? When it is justifiable to take the leave? The "to be taken" makes crystal clear exactly what about the leaves is justifiable. Is this clarification necessary? Maybe, maybe not, but the fact that there's even a question about whether it could be necessary means that including it cannot be dismissed a redundant because the phrase may be serving a necessarily clarifying purpose for someone.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Thanks a ton mike for the awesome explanation..
Yeah, now it does make sense and its clear.. :) :)
Re: The board follows policies that are unreasonably strict and   [#permalink] 18 Oct 2013, 09:49
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