Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 19 Aug 2014, 21:15

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

The coal strike reduced Indiana's energy reserves, which

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 26 Mar 2006
Posts: 647
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
The coal strike reduced Indiana's energy reserves, which [#permalink] New post 19 Nov 2007, 03:01
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
The coal strike reduced Indiana's energy reserves, which caused unemployment among the workers.

(A) which caused unemployment among the workers.
(B) which caused the workers to be unemployed.
(C) a circumstance that resulted in unemployment.
(D) a fact that created unemployed workers.
(E) which led many workers to be unemployed.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Jun 2007
Posts: 157
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 12 [0], given: 0

 [#permalink] New post 19 Nov 2007, 03:05
It has to be (C)

A, B and E suggest that the energy reserves caused the unemployment, not the strike.

D suggests that the strike created the workers.
SVP
SVP
avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2006
Posts: 1550
Followers: 8

Kudos [?]: 191 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 20 Nov 2007, 00:17
not only that, C is also the best choice because it avoids redundancy. When you speak of unemployement, of course you are talking about workers. who else could you possibly be referring to? students????
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 09 Oct 2007
Posts: 468
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 1

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 20 Nov 2007, 00:29
plus, a fact that... gmat dislikes that particular phrase
CEO
CEO
User avatar
Joined: 29 Mar 2007
Posts: 2593
Followers: 16

Kudos [?]: 183 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: SC - Pronouns [#permalink] New post 20 Nov 2007, 15:23
Beyond700 wrote:
The coal strike reduced Indiana's energy reserves, which caused unemployment among the workers.

(A) which caused unemployment among the workers.
(B) which caused the workers to be unemployed.
(C) a circumstance that resulted in unemployment.
(D) a fact that created unemployed workers.
(E) which led many workers to be unemployed.



ABE all wrong b/c improper use of which.

D: a fact that, this is a no no on the gmat most of the time. Also a circumstance better describes what actually happened. The coal strike is a fact, but its better described as a circumstance.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 13 Dec 2006
Posts: 521
Location: Indonesia
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 92 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 20 Nov 2007, 17:19
Clear C

Agree with Gmatblackbelt on D, while rest are wrong for using incorrect modifiers.

Amar
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Aug 2007
Posts: 370
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 21 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: SC - Pronouns [#permalink] New post 20 Nov 2007, 19:12
Beyond700 wrote:
The coal strike reduced Indiana's energy reserves, which caused unemployment among the workers.

(A) which caused unemployment among the workers.
(B) which caused the workers to be unemployed.
(C) a circumstance that resulted in unemployment.
(D) a fact that created unemployed workers.
(E) which led many workers to be unemployed.


For some reason I thought "Which" over here was referring to the previous clause.

totally missed this one!!
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 26 Mar 2006
Posts: 647
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 21 Nov 2007, 05:30
Raffie wrote:
It has to be (C)

A, B and E suggest that the energy reserves caused the unemployment, not the strike.

D suggests that the strike created the workers.


On target. OA is C
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Aug 2007
Posts: 370
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 21 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 21 Nov 2007, 08:03
Beyond700 wrote:
Raffie wrote:
It has to be (C)

A, B and E suggest that the energy reserves caused the unemployment, not the strike.

D suggests that the strike created the workers.


On target. OA is C


Lately I have been confusing myself more and more with the usage of "Which" - I guess I have been too many sources.

1. Which can be used as a relative pronoun referring back to the closest noun and always preceded by a comma - I agree with this one its easy.

2. But sometimes which behaves like an absolute phrase and refers back to the previous sentence as a whole.

Why cant the usage of which above be the latter of the two??

Is the which in the options above a restrictive or non-restrictive clause


can someone please please help me out here.....
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 26 Mar 2006
Posts: 647
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 22 Nov 2007, 06:33
spider wrote:
Beyond700 wrote:
Raffie wrote:
It has to be (C)

A, B and E suggest that the energy reserves caused the unemployment, not the strike.

D suggests that the strike created the workers.


On target. OA is C


Lately I have been confusing myself more and more with the usage of "Which" - I guess I have been too many sources.

1. Which can be used as a relative pronoun referring back to the closest noun and always preceded by a comma - I agree with this one its easy.

2. But sometimes which behaves like an absolute phrase and refers back to the previous sentence as a whole.

Why cant the usage of which above be the latter of the two??

Is the which in the options above a restrictive or non-restrictive clause


can someone please please help me out here.....


This is how I see it...

In the above sentence:
The coal strike reduced Indian's energy reserves, which...

The coal strike - Subject
reduced - verb
Indiana's energy reserves - object

which - modifier . Modifies the object with this clause 'caused unemployment among the workers'
Here which rightly points to a noun but the whole sentence is illogical.

Absolute phrases are made of nouns or pronouns followed by a participle and any modifiers of the noun or pronoun. Absolute phrases contain a subject (unlike participial phrases), and no predicate. They serve to modify an entire sentence.

Where as the relative pronoun which refers to inanimate things and to animals: in their noun or pronoun form

As the first clause can stand by itself and also, as there is a comma , before which - non-restrictive clause[/b]
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 07 Nov 2007
Posts: 1829
Location: New York
Followers: 25

Kudos [?]: 438 [0], given: 5

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 22 Nov 2007, 08:58
If I modify the sentencse (d) like below
d)a fact that resulted in unemployment

Which one you will chose? c or d please explain your answers.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 03 May 2007
Posts: 899
Schools: University of Chicago, Wharton School
Followers: 6

Kudos [?]: 43 [0], given: 6

GMAT Tests User
Re: SC - Pronouns [#permalink] New post 22 Nov 2007, 10:53
Beyond700 wrote:
The coal strike reduced Indiana's energy reserves, which caused unemployment among the workers.

(A) which caused unemployment among the workers.
(B) which caused the workers to be unemployed.
(C) a circumstance that resulted in unemployment.
(D) a fact that created unemployed workers.
(E) which led many workers to be unemployed.


C. Which in A, B, and E refers to wrong noun. in D, it is wrong to say that "The coal strike reduced Indiana's energy reserves" created unemplyoed workers.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 26 Mar 2006
Posts: 647
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 22 Nov 2007, 17:47
x2suresh wrote:
If I modify the sentencse (d) like below
d)a fact that resulted in unemployment

Which one you will chose? c or d please explain your answers.


Both (C) and (D) will be redundant..which means you will have 2 right answer choices.

a fact that resulted in unemployment

or

a circumstance that resulted in unemployment
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Aug 2007
Posts: 370
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 21 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
 [#permalink] New post 22 Nov 2007, 18:08
Beyond700 wrote:
spider wrote:
Beyond700 wrote:
Raffie wrote:
It has to be (C)

A, B and E suggest that the energy reserves caused the unemployment, not the strike.

D suggests that the strike created the workers.


On target. OA is C


Lately I have been confusing myself more and more with the usage of "Which" - I guess I have been too many sources.

1. Which can be used as a relative pronoun referring back to the closest noun and always preceded by a comma - I agree with this one its easy.

2. But sometimes which behaves like an absolute phrase and refers back to the previous sentence as a whole.

Why cant the usage of which above be the latter of the two??

Is the which in the options above a restrictive or non-restrictive clause


can someone please please help me out here.....


This is how I see it...

In the above sentence:
The coal strike reduced Indian's energy reserves, which...

The coal strike - Subject
reduced - verb
Indiana's energy reserves - object

which - modifier . Modifies the object with this clause 'caused unemployment among the workers'
Here which rightly points to a noun but the whole sentence is illogical.

Absolute phrases are made of nouns or pronouns followed by a participle and any modifiers of the noun or pronoun. Absolute phrases contain a subject (unlike participial phrases), and no predicate. They serve to modify an entire sentence.

Where as the relative pronoun which refers to inanimate things and to animals: in their noun or pronoun form

As the first clause can stand by itself and also, as there is a comma , before which - non-restrictive clause[/b]


Beyond700 - Thank you for taking out time for the explanation.

I see in this case the which clause is modifying the noun and is a non-essential modifier.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 02 Jul 2007
Posts: 77
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 6 [0], given: 1

SC-Pronouns [#permalink] New post 26 Nov 2007, 01:39
Hi Beyond700,

I am still not clear on the usage of the relative pronoun which. Can you please explain to me with the aid of sentences the use of which-

1. To modifer an inanimate thing

2. To modifer a sentence

Don.
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 26 Mar 2006
Posts: 647
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 0

GMAT Tests User
Re: SC-Pronouns [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2007, 20:17
don2007 wrote:
Hi Beyond700,

I am still not clear on the usage of the relative pronoun which. Can you please explain to me with the aid of sentences the use of which-

1. To modifer an inanimate thing

2. To modifer a sentence

Don.


As it is quite elaborate, I thought I would share with you some of my notes on this. Kindly have a go at it and feel free to discuss on the same.
Attachments

Usage of that_which.doc [26.5 KiB]
Downloaded 94 times

To download please login or register as a user

Re: SC-Pronouns   [#permalink] 27 Nov 2007, 20:17
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
1 Which schools are renowded in Energy/renewable ? EmanueleB 1 24 Jul 2014, 11:56
Oil reserves pawan82 1 07 Jul 2007, 01:02
energy stevegt 6 25 Jun 2007, 19:41
Energy praveen_rao7 6 29 Jan 2005, 07:09
2 Indiana Kelley Hjort 15 04 Dec 2004, 17:20
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The coal strike reduced Indiana's energy reserves, which

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.