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The following table shows scores of Class A and Class B in a

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The following table shows scores of Class A and Class B in a [#permalink] New post 27 Jan 2005, 22:31
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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(N/A)

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0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
The following table shows scores of Class A and Class B in a test:

A median 80 average 82
B median 78 average 74

Is the average score for all students greater than the median score of all students?

(I)A has 37 students, B has 40 students
(II)There are 77 students in total
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2005, 00:20
I think median of a combined set cannot be less than median of each.

If this right, I) would suffice. The information provided in A is required to calculate the average (which will be around 77) and since the median is at least 78, we know the answer.

II) We can't decide on average based on this info, as the average could come close to B's average if there are lost of students in B and less in A.

I quickly pick A.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2005, 06:44
"A" for me. Not a quick one though. :oops:

HongHu, can u share the source of this problem, may be I will buy that book
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2005, 06:54
Had to struggle with this one is it A tho......
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2005, 13:09
from I we can get the weighted average

A is good enough
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2005, 14:21
banerjeea_98 wrote:
"A" for me. Not a quick one though. :oops:

HongHu, can u share the source of this problem, may be I will buy that book


It's a Chinese one. :)
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2005, 15:11
HongHu wrote:
banerjeea_98 wrote:
"A" for me. Not a quick one though. :oops:

HongHu, can u share the source of this problem, may be I will buy that book


It's a Chinese one. :)


I can read chinese 8-) just kidding.... :)
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2005, 15:30
I'm taking my test on 2/15. I can mail it to you after that. :D
(Chinese is very easy. ;);))
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2005, 20:07
Hong Hu you seem to have a good collection of questions. Sad its in Chinese
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2005, 22:50
b/w A and E, probably A is the answer.-same reason as did by nocilis....
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2005, 22:57
Oops, did I forget to post OA? It is (A).
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Jan 2005, 23:54
[quote="nocilis"]I think median of a combined set cannot be less than median of each.

I dont think this statement is correct.
Can anyone explain how is it A?
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Jan 2005, 00:13
The median of a combined set can't be smaller than the smallest median of the individual sets, and can't be larger than the largest median of the individual sets.
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2005, 21:14
swath20 wrote:
Hong Hu you seem to have a good collection of questions. Sad its in Chinese


Not so sad :-D Hong Hu are you living in China ? Where did you buy this book ? I am a french guy lost in Shenzhen :stupid but I can speak chinese :bebe so i am interested...
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 [#permalink] New post 01 Feb 2005, 23:40
No actually I'm now in US, I bought the book from a Chinese friend that came from Beijing about a year ago, I think. I'm sure you can find GMAT preparation books in China if you ask the right people.
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2005, 00:06
HongHu wrote:
The median of a combined set can't be smaller than the smallest median of the individual sets, and can't be larger than the largest median of the individual sets.


OK, this is the first time I hear this. Can you prove it?
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2005, 00:23
Give me some time to think about how to prove it.
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Feb 2005, 00:51
HongHu wrote:
Give me some time to think about how to prove it.


OK, waiting...

Where can I learn more about mean, median, mode, S.D? I just want to know all the properties/theories behind. My math knowledge is not from American education system. Back then I didn't get to know about those and probability until I moved to the US. So there is my weakness.
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2005, 17:26
HongHu wrote:
Give me some time to think about how to prove it.


I don't have any algebric formula to explain this but I definitely agree with HongHu. The global median has to be inside the set of the 2 others median, I put some drawing attached with this post, it doesn't explain anything but it just help me to figure it out...
Attachments

median.JPG
median.JPG [ 19.09 KiB | Viewed 316 times ]

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 [#permalink] New post 11 Feb 2005, 21:44
Here is the proof.

Let U(A)=the smallest x so that at least half the values are <x, and
V(A)=the largest x so that at least half the values are >x, then that
makes M(A)=(U(A)+V(A))/2: i.e. no need to distinguish between even or
odd number of elements.

We can assume without loss of generality that U(A)<=U(B): otherwise we
just swap A and B. This gives three different possibilities:

a) U(A)<=V(A)<U(B)<=V(B)
b) U(A)<=U(B)<=V(A)<=V(B)
c) U(A)<U(B)<=V(B)<V(A)

In case a, for x<V(A), no more than half the values of A are <x; since
x<U(B), less than half the values are <x. Hence, less than half the
values of A+B are <x, and we must have U(A+B)>x. As this holds for all
x<V(A), this makes V(A+B)>=V(A). Similarly, U(A+B)<=U(B). Hence,
M(A)<=V(A)<=M(A+B)<=U(B)<=M(B).

If U(A)<=U(B)<=V(A), for x<U(B) less than half the values in B are <x,
whereas x<V(A) makes at most half the values of A <x; thus less than
half the values of A+B are <x, which makes x<U(A+B). However, for
x=U(B), at least half than values of both A and B are <x, so this is
also true for A+B. This proves that U(A+B)=U(B).

Similarly, if U(B)<=V(A)<=V(B), then V(A+B)=V(A). Case b now follows
as 2*M(A)=U(A)+V(A)<=U(B)+V(A)=U(A+B)+V(A+B)=2*M(A+B) etc.

In case c, the above arguments gives U(A+B)=U(B) and V(A+B)=V(B),
which makes M(A+B)=M(B).
  [#permalink] 11 Feb 2005, 21:44
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The following table shows scores of Class A and Class B in a

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