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The format of network television news programs generally

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Director
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The format of network television news programs generally [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2007, 09:27
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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  5% (low)

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0% (00:00) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 0 sessions
The format of network television news programs generally allows advocates of a point of view only 30 seconds to convey their message. Consequently, regular watchers become accustomed to thinking of issues in terms only of slogans and catch phrases, and so the expectation of careful discussion of public issues gradually disappears from their awareness. The format of newspaper stories, on the other hand, leads readers to pursue details of stories headed by the most important facts and so has the opposite effect on regular readers—that of maintaining the expectation of careful discussion of public issues. Therefore, in contrast to regular newspaper reading, regular watching of network television news programs increases the tendency to think of public issues in oversimplified terms.

The argument assumes which one of the following?
(A) Viewers of network television news programs would be interested in seeing advocates of opposing views present their positions at length.
(B) Since it is not possible to present striking images that would symbolize events for viewers, and since images hold sway over words in television, television must oversimplify.
(C) It is not possible for television to present public issues in a way that allows for the nuanced presentation of diverse views and a good-faith interchange between advocates of opposing views.
(D) In network television news reports, it is not usual for a reporter to offer additional factual evidence and background information to develop a story in which opposing views are presented briefly by their advocates.
(E) Television news reporters introduce more of their own biases into news stories than do newspaper reporters.

Please explain ur POE...
SVP
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2007, 09:53
The argument depends on the assumption that because important factual information relevant to an argument is not presented by experts in the 30 second window, there is no other way for television viewers to understand the issue in depth.

Lets assume that D is false. D if false implies that

In network television news reports, it is usual for a reporter to offer additional factual evidence and background information to develop a story in which opposing views are presented briefly by their advocates.

This refutes the conclusion of the argument that network television news oversimplifies public issues.

Thus, D is the answer.
Manager
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2007, 10:16
To choose between C and D.

C is out because the language is extreme. (it is not possible).

D is correct.
Director
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2007, 19:55
Hi surbab...If the language in C was usual instead of possible...would u have chosen C??
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2007, 20:13
Agree with D.
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Trying hard to conquer Quant.

Manager
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Re: CR-network television [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2007, 20:44
vineetgupta wrote:
The format of network television news programs generally allows advocates of a point of view only 30 seconds to convey their message. Consequently, regular watchers become accustomed to thinking of issues in terms only of slogans and catch phrases, and so the expectation of careful discussion of public issues gradually disappears from their awareness. The format of newspaper stories, on the other hand, leads readers to pursue details of stories headed by the most important facts and so has the opposite effect on regular readers—that of maintaining the expectation of careful discussion of public issues. Therefore, in contrast to regular newspaper reading, regular watching of network television news programs increases the tendency to think of public issues in oversimplified terms.

The argument assumes which one of the following?
(A) Viewers of network television news programs would be interested in seeing advocates of opposing views present their positions at length.
(B) Since it is not possible to present striking images that would symbolize events for viewers, and since images hold sway over words in television, television must oversimplify.
(C) It is not possible for television to present public issues in a way that allows for the nuanced presentation of diverse views and a good-faith interchange between advocates of opposing views.
(D) In network television news reports, it is not usual for a reporter to offer additional factual evidence and background information to develop a story in which opposing views are presented briefly by their advocates.
(E) Television news reporters introduce more of their own biases into news stories than do newspaper reporters.

Please explain ur POE...


D?
Re: CR-network television   [#permalink] 04 Apr 2007, 20:44
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