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The function of government is to satisfy the genuine wants

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The function of government is to satisfy the genuine wants [#permalink] New post 26 Jan 2004, 13:46
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A
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The function of government is to satisfy the genuine wants of the masses, and government cannot satisfy those wants unless it is informed about what those wants are. Freedom of speech ensures that such information will reach the ears of government officials. Therefore, freedom of speech is indispensable for a healthy state.

Which one of the following, if true, would NOT undermine the conclusion of the argument?

(A) People most often do not know what they genuinely want.

(B) Freedom of speech tends ultimately to undermine social order, and social order is a prerequisite for satisfying the wants of the masses.

(C) The proper function of government is not to satisfy wants, but to provide equality of opportunity.

(D) Freedom of speech is not sufficient for satisfying the wants of the masses: social order is necessary as well.

(E) Rulers already know what the people want.
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 [#permalink] New post 26 Jan 2004, 13:49
I would go with D.

D says freedom of speech is not a sufficient condition but masses need somthing extra. So this does not undermine the conclusion.
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 [#permalink] New post 03 Feb 2004, 05:33
anandnk wrote:
I would go with D.

D says freedom of speech is not a sufficient condition but masses need somthing extra. So this does not undermine the conclusion.


I would say:

D says freedom of speech is not a sufficient condition, but it does not refute the conclusion that it is a necessary condition. Hence, it does not weaken the conclusion.
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Feb 2004, 14:32
pmjain wrote:
My Answer is E


You want to find the choice that does NOT weaken the argument.

The conclusion is the FOS is necessary. However, if govt already knowswhat people want, then FOS is not necessary for govt to find out what people want, hence, E weakens the argument.
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Re: LS-T1-CR1-23 [#permalink] New post 21 Dec 2008, 01:24
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Should be D

Weaken X Category of question.
All except D weakens the question.
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Re: LS-T1-CR1-23 [#permalink] New post 21 Dec 2008, 12:50
Yep Another D

Every thing else we can say F O S is dispensable.
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Re: LS-T1-CR1-23 [#permalink] New post 22 Dec 2008, 11:44
I was debating between C and D. But then realized that if govt doen't care abt 'wants' then it doesnt care abt F O S as well so it undermines the conclusion...

I almost picked wrong answer (C).

thanks for the post. +1 to you kpadma.

Thanks.
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Re: LS-T1-CR1-23 [#permalink] New post 22 Dec 2008, 12:59
Agree with D
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Re: LS-T1-CR1-23 [#permalink] New post 23 Dec 2008, 09:47
kpadma wrote:
The function of government is to satisfy the genuine wants of the masses, and government cannot satisfy those wants unless it is informed about what those wants are. Freedom of speech ensures that such information will reach the ears of government officials. Therefore, freedom of speech is indispensable for a healthy state.

Which one of the following, if true, would NOT undermine the conclusion of the argument?

(A) People most often do not know what they genuinely want.

(B) Freedom of speech tends ultimately to undermine social order, and social order is a prerequisite for satisfying the wants of the masses.

(C) The proper function of government is not to satisfy wants, but to provide equality of opportunity.

(D) Freedom of speech is not sufficient for satisfying the wants of the masses: social order is necessary as well.

(E) Rulers already know what the people want.


I have slightly different view and think A is better than D.

Not knowing what people genuinely want doesnot undermine the freedom of speech and the passage says that freedom of speech is indispensibleable (i.e. sole and whole). D says freedom of speech is not sufficient means it is not indispensible. Social order is also required.

Therefore I am leaning towards A.
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Re: LS-T1-CR1-23 [#permalink] New post 23 Dec 2008, 12:06
same here D
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Re: LS-T1-CR1-23 [#permalink] New post 24 Dec 2008, 01:09
I think the answer is A because the argument says FOS si neccessary for a healthy state

so if we assume A then it strengthens the argument i.e people most often do not know what they genuinely want it means if they are given FOS they can express their feelings to the goverment in a better way thus not undermining the conclusion.

kpadma wrote:
The function of government is to satisfy the genuine wants of the masses, and government cannot satisfy those wants unless it is informed about what those wants are. Freedom of speech ensures that such information will reach the ears of government officials. Therefore, freedom of speech is indispensable for a healthy state.

Which one of the following, if true, would NOT undermine the conclusion of the argument?

(A) People most often do not know what they genuinely want.

(B) Freedom of speech tends ultimately to undermine social order, and social order is a prerequisite for satisfying the wants of the masses.

(C) The proper function of government is not to satisfy wants, but to provide equality of opportunity.

(D) Freedom of speech is not sufficient for satisfying the wants of the masses: social order is necessary as well.

(E) Rulers already know what the people want.
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Re: LS-T1-CR1-23 [#permalink] New post 27 Dec 2008, 11:32
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Re: LS-T1-CR1-23 [#permalink] New post 29 Dec 2008, 04:21
agree with D
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Re: LS-T1-CR1-23 [#permalink] New post 29 Dec 2008, 05:01
How can it be D...
we are not talking about social order, instead the argument is about FOS..

D can be the case if we rely on a assumption outside the scope of the argument.
Re: LS-T1-CR1-23   [#permalink] 29 Dec 2008, 05:01
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