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The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were

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The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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The Glass House mountains in Queensland, Australia,were sighted in 1770 by the English navigator Captain James Cook, by whom they were named supposedly because its sheer wet rocks glistened like glass.

(A) by whom they were named supposedly because its
(B) by whom they were named supposedly and their
(C) naming them supposedly since their
(D) who so named them supposedly because their
(E) who so named it since supposedly their

In D and E, I don't clearly understand the meaning or sense of SO. Could someone please explain? Thanks!
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Last edited by Skywalker18 on 05 Jun 2016, 21:18, edited 1 time in total.
Added the underlined portion
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2011, 06:19
IMHO so here is there for the sole purpose to refer back to the name glass house mountains else the sentence would read
who named them supposedly because - may be he named them something else and later they were given the present name, then the sentecne makes no sense.
This is wht i think, i may well be wrong.
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2011, 08:01
The English navigator Captain James Cook named the mountains in Queensland, Australia as the Glass House Mountains; he named the mountains so because their sheer wet rocks glistened like glass.
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2011, 01:39
guys, why cant we use C here?

cant we use Ving to remove Who?
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2011, 18:54
i picked B, and clearly it was wrong!, can some explain the difference between 'by whom' and 'who so named'
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2011, 23:19
B- is implying that there are two things which are joined by and.name and their wet glass aren't two things.

he named them because of their wet glass
A- is wrong .pronoun doesn't agree with plural antecedent
B- implying two separate things "named and their"
C-naming is ambiguous
D-precisely implicit the idea CORRECT[highlight][/highlight]
E-It doesn't has any antecedent.and vague
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 06 Mar 2012, 19:13
I picked the answer D in this case:

Answer choices A and E are out because of subject verb agreement. The pronoun "its" in choice A does no agree with the subject Mountains. The pronoun "it" in choice E does not agree with the subject Mountains either.

I took out answer choice C because "naming" seems to describe the entire main clause. However, you actually want James Cook to be the subject who named the Glass House Mountains, so this answer choice didn't make sense to me.

The answer choice in B is in passive voice. This alone isn't justification for ruling out this answer choice; however, you want James Cook to be the subject in the subordinate clause and since "whom" is always an object, I ruled this answer out.

This left me with choice D, which I feel clearly expresses the intended meaning and is grammatically correct.
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2012, 00:04
The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were sighted in 1770 by the English navigator Captain James Cook, by whom they were named supposedlybecause its sheer wet rocks glistened like glass.

(A) by whom they were named supposedly because its --- its refer to Glass Mountains S/V
(B) by whom they were named supposedly and their --- and is not appropriate
(C) naming them supposedly since their --- Naming will modify the whole previous clause which is inappropriate.
(D) who so named them supposedly because their
(E) who so named it since supposedly their --- it refers to plural Glass Mountains
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2012, 02:36
"James Cook sighted the mountains , naming them supposedly because of their ... "

Would this structure be correct ? I have a huge problem understanding the proper usage of these participles.
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2016, 04:03
Hi Experts / VeritasPrepKarishma / chetan2u / mikemcgarry ,

In this sentence why we have used "were" for "The Glass House Mountains" , according to me it should be singular.

Please have a look on this official question-

_________________________________________________________
Q -101 of OG Verbal Review 2 .

Quote-

The Federalist papers, a strong defense of the United States Constitution and important as a body of work in political science as well, represents the handiwork of three different authors.

(A) and important as a body of work in political science as well, represents

(B) as well as an important body of work in political science, represent

(C) and also a body of work of importance in political science is representing

(D) an important body of work in political science and has been representative of

(E) and as political science an important body of work too, represent

Correct answer is choice B;
_____________________________________________________________________
Unquote

The interesting part is the explanation given in the OG VR2 for Q 101-

The Federalist papers- as per OG since the P in papers is NOT CAPITALIZED ,'The Federalist papers' is PLURAL and must have a plural verb..

The Federalist Papers- as per OG since the P in papers in CAPITALIZED ,'The Federalist Papers' is SINGULAR and must have singular verb..



Applying the above OG explanation to this question, it seems that 'The Glass House Mountains' is singular and must take SINGULAR VERBS.

Can you please assist, whats the issue ..??

Thanks and Regards,
Prakhar
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2016, 06:42
PrakharGMAT wrote:
Hi Experts / VeritasPrepKarishma / chetan2u / mikemcgarry ,

In this sentence why we have used "were" for "The Glass House Mountains" , according to me it should be singular.

Please have a look on this official question-

_________________________________________________________
Q -101 of OG Verbal Review 2 .

Quote-

The Federalist papers, a strong defense of the United States Constitution and important as a body of work in political science as well, represents the handiwork of three different authors.

(A) and important as a body of work in political science as well, represents

(B) as well as an important body of work in political science, represent

(C) and also a body of work of importance in political science is representing

(D) an important body of work in political science and has been representative of

(E) and as political science an important body of work too, represent

Correct answer is choice B;
_____________________________________________________________________
Unquote

The interesting part is the explanation given in the OG VR2 for Q 101-

The Federalist papers- as per OG since the P in papers is NOT CAPITALIZED ,'The Federalist papers' is PLURAL and must have a plural verb..

The Federalist Papers- as per OG since the P in papers in CAPITALIZED ,'The Federalist Papers' is SINGULAR and must have singular verb..



Applying the above OG explanation to this question, it seems that 'The Glass House Mountains' is singular and must take SINGULAR VERBS.

Can you please assist, whats the issue ..??

Thanks and Regards,
Prakhar


Thank you for this observation... modified the sentence accordingly.
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2016, 09:55
PrakharGMAT wrote:
Applying the above OG explanation to this question, it seems that 'The Glass House Mountains' is singular and must take SINGULAR VERBS.

Hi Prakhar, hope OG's explanation behind the capital vs small P was clear to you. If we have capital P, it would mean that The Federalist Papers could be the name of a single publication; however, if we have The Federalist papers, then this could as well represent multiple papers (with The Federalist acting as an Adjective).

Now, can The Federalist Papers be the name of a book? I would say yes (wherein this book is a compilation of multiple papers).

Can The Glass House Mountains be the name of a mountain? I would say no; if it was just one mountain, then the name would rather have been The Glass House Mountain (and not Mountains).

So, I don't believe that similar analogy can be applied to mountains. Out of curiosity, I googled for The Glass House Mountains; looks like The Glass House Mountains (with capital M) are a group of eleven hills.
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2016, 11:31
Hi Experts, EducationAisle / sayantanc2k ,

Thanks for your contribution to this question. The reason why came across this issue is because of this sentence-


Source- e-GMAT

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, which stood near a grand palace known as “The Marvel of Mankind” were reputedly constructed by using a combination of baked bricks and lead coverings, are believed to have been destroyed during an earthquake in the first century A.D.

A) were reputedly constructed by using a combination of baked bricks and lead coverings, are
B) was reputedly constructed by using a combination of baked bricks and lead coverings, is

Option A is correct. But according to me option B should be OA

As per them-
If there were only one hanging garden, it would be named "The Hanging Garden of Babylon". The Great Wall of China, another wonder of the world, is singular because its one continuous wall and hence is named correctly. Similarly, if the name is "The Hanging Gardens of Babylon", it is evident that there were more than one garden and hence, the plural noun in the name.

Can you please suggest, which option is correct. I am not able to understand how could "The Hanging Gardens" is plural.. :roll:

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Read the first line in this Wikipedia Article
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanging_G ... of_Babylon

It says "The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, is the only one whose location has not been definitively established."

But, GMAT does not require any prior knowledge. It could be any name which even does not exist.

sayantanc2k

I see that you have made the modification but on all other forums it written as Mountains with capital "M". do you know the source of this question by any chance..?
I think its from OG's but don't know from which one.. :(

Please have a look into this.
Thanks
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2016, 13:56
metallicafan wrote:
The Glass House mountains in Queensland, Australia,were sighted in 1770 by the English navigator Captain James Cook, by whom they were named supposedlybecause its sheer wet rocks glistened like glass.

(A) by whom they were named supposedly because its
(B) by whom they were named supposedly and their
(C) naming them supposedly since their
(D) who so named them supposedly because their
(E) who so named it since supposedly their

In D and E, I don't clearly understand the meaning or sense of SO. Could someone please explain? Thanks!


'The Glass House mountains' require plural verb 'their'. A is out

(B) by whom they were named supposedly and their 'They' refers to what?
(C) naming them supposedly since their 'naming them supposedly' does'nt give the desired meaning
(D) who so named them supposedly because their correct option
(E) who so named it since supposedly their 'it' is singular


D is the answer
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2016, 19:57
PrakharGMAT wrote:
The reason why came across this issue is because of this sentence-

Source- e-GMAT

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, which stood near a grand palace known as “The Marvel of Mankind” were reputedly constructed by using a combination of baked bricks and lead coverings, are believed to have been destroyed during an earthquake in the first century A.D.

A) were reputedly constructed by using a combination of baked bricks and lead coverings, are
B) was reputedly constructed by using a combination of baked bricks and lead coverings, is

Option A is correct. But according to me option B should be OA

As per them-
If there were only one hanging garden, it would be named "The Hanging Garden of Babylon". The Great Wall of China, another wonder of the world, is singular because its one continuous wall and hence is named correctly. Similarly, if the name is "The Hanging Gardens of Babylon", it is evident that there were more than one garden and hence, the plural noun in the name.

This is consistent with what I mentioned in my previous post. If there was just one garden, it would be logically strange (and that's putting it mildly) to name it The Hanging Gardens. Let's look at it other way: With just one continuous wall, could there have been any logical reason to name the wall as The Great Walls of China? I would say no.

Quote:
Can you please suggest, which option is correct. I am not able to understand how could "The Hanging Gardens" is plural.. :roll:

EducationAisle
Read the first line in this Wikipedia Article
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanging_G ... of_Babylon

It says "The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, is the only one whose location has not been definitively established."

Couple of things. For one, wiki cannot be expected to conform with the high standards of formal written English that is a characteristic of GMAT SC. In fact, even in the same wiki article there is a contradiction, because in almost all other places in the artcile, wiki has referred to The Hanging Gardens as plural (The Hanging Gardens were a distinctive feature of ancient Babylon).

In my previous post, the reason why I referred to wiki article was not for any grammatical reference, but to corroborate that indeed these Glass Mountains were a group of multiple mountains.

Quote:
But, GMAT does not require any prior knowledge.

There is no prior knowledge required here; just logical inference.

Quote:
It could be any name which even does not exist.

That actually is very unlikely. In fact, GMAT sentences correction questions many a times are a source of great General Knowledge information :)

Quote:
do you know the source of this question by any chance..?
I think its from OG's but don't know from which one.. :(

OG-12 (#1 in sample questions).
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2016, 14:20
EducationAisle wrote:
PrakharGMAT wrote:
Applying the above OG explanation to this question, it seems that 'The Glass House Mountains' is singular and must take SINGULAR VERBS.

Hi Prakhar, hope OG's explanation behind the capital vs small P was clear to you. If we have capital P, it would mean that The Federalist Papers could be the name of a single publication; however, if we have The Federalist papers, then this could as well represent multiple papers (with The Federalist acting as an Adjective).

Now, can The Federalist Papers be the name of a book? I would say yes (wherein this book is a compilation of multiple papers).

Can The Glass House Mountains be the name of a mountain? I would say no; if it was just one mountain, then the name would rather have been The Glass House Mountain (and not Mountains).

So, I don't believe that similar analogy can be applied to mountains. Out of curiosity, I googled for The Glass House Mountains; looks like The Glass House Mountains (with capital M) are a group of eleven hills.


Like your other explanations, this explanation is very logical. But unlike other cases, this case brings us on the opposite sides of the court. :)

If a collection of papers can be singular, why can't a group of mountains be? Even in the last sentence you mentioned "The Glass House Mountains (with capital M) are a group of eleven hills.", the verb "are" seems somewhat inappropriate to me. In my opinion the sentence should be "The Glass House Mountains (with capital M) is a group of eleven hills."

Another example: I would say that "The Himalayas" is singular although there are hundreds of mountains in the mountain range - the reason is that "The Himalayas" is the name of a mountain range. Similarly I would say "The Glass House Mountains" is the name of a range/group of mountains, and hence should be singular.

Is there anything wrong with my argument?
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The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2016, 21:58
Interesting analysis . I never thought capitalization could be decisive in deciding Subject verb agreement :roll: .
mikemcgarry , egmat , VeritasPrepKarishma , daagh , IanStewart or any other expert - Please advise . :)
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jun 2016, 06:19
sayantanc2k wrote:
this case brings us on the opposite sides of the court. :)

Hi sayantanc2k, discussions and debates are always the best way of learning for all of us.

Quote:
If a collection of papers can be singular, why can't a group of mountains be?

Actually collection of papers will always be singular (because collection is the subject); similarly, group of mountains will always be singular (because group is the subject).

Quote:
Even in the last sentence you mentioned "The Glass House Mountains (with capital M) are a group of eleven hills.", the verb "are" seems somewhat inappropriate to me. In my opinion the sentence should be "The Glass House Mountains (with capital M) is a group of eleven hills."

In my post above, I have given a logical reason why The Glass House Mountains is plural. In fact, now that we have traced this question back to Official Guide, I find your contention quite surprising: The official questions are correct. We really can't debate their authenticity.

Quote:
Another example: I would say that "The Himalayas" is singular although there are hundreds of mountains in the mountain range - the reason is that "The Himalayas" is the name of a mountain range. Similarly I would say "The Glass House Mountains" is the name of a range/group of mountains, and hence should be singular.

I would definitely think that The Himalayas is plural; have you come across any official question where GMAT treats The Himalayas as singular (can you please cite the entire question)?

If there is no official source for this, then it's a bit moot point to discuss, because on the net, we can find sources that can support almost anything :) .

Hence, to continue this discussion further, it would be great if you can perhaps cite some examples based on official sources (the way PrakharGMAT did a great job by citing two official questions), rather than pondering on hypothetical. I am sure all of us will learn something from them (official questions are always such a treasure trove of knowledge!).
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Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2016, 14:10
EducationAisle wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
this case brings us on the opposite sides of the court. :)

Hi sayantanc2k, discussions and debates are always the best way of learning for all of us.

Quote:
If a collection of papers can be singular, why can't a group of mountains be?

Actually collection of papers will always be singular (because collection is the subject); similarly, group of mountains will always be singular (because group is the subject).

Quote:
Even in the last sentence you mentioned "The Glass House Mountains (with capital M) are a group of eleven hills.", the verb "are" seems somewhat inappropriate to me. In my opinion the sentence should be "The Glass House Mountains (with capital M) is a group of eleven hills."

In my post above, I have given a logical reason why The Glass House Mountains is plural. In fact, now that we have traced this question back to Official Guide, I find your contention quite surprising: The official questions are correct. We really can't debate their authenticity.

Quote:
Another example: I would say that "The Himalayas" is singular although there are hundreds of mountains in the mountain range - the reason is that "The Himalayas" is the name of a mountain range. Similarly I would say "The Glass House Mountains" is the name of a range/group of mountains, and hence should be singular.

I would definitely think that The Himalayas is plural; have you come across any official question where GMAT treats The Himalayas as singular (can you please cite the entire question)?

If there is no official source for this, then it's a bit moot point to discuss, because on the net, we can find sources that can support almost anything :) .

Hence, to continue this discussion further, it would be great if you can perhaps cite some examples based on official sources (the way PrakharGMAT did a great job by citing two official questions), rather than pondering on hypothetical. I am sure all of us will learn something from them (official questions are always such a treasure trove of knowledge!).


Thank you for the detailed response. This kind of discussions actually help think very critically. :-D

The argument that "The Himalayas" as a mountain range is singular is neither from any OG, nor from any internet source. It logically occurred to me that name of a mountain range should be singular and hence I cited the example.

As you mentioned, there is absolutely no questioning an OG example - I know I am missing something in this, but I want to know exactly what.

I am not clear (even after going through your explanation more than once), why "Federal papers" and "Glass House Mountains" are not analogous? I am quoting you here with modifications (in green) I felt would support why they are analogous, so that we could probably discuss further where my argument is wrong:

"Now, can The Federalist Papers be the name of a book? I would say yes (wherein this book is a compilation of multiple papers).

Can The Glass House Mountains be the name of a mountain RANGE ? I would say no YES (this range is a group of eleven hills) ."

Why can't this analogy be used?
Re: The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were   [#permalink] 08 Jun 2016, 14:10

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The Glass House Mountains in Queensland, Australia,were

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