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The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each

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The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2005, 02:30
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A
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C
D
E

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7. The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each question a test of a certain math concept.

A. each question a test on a certain math concept

B. all the questions a test on a certain math concept

C. all the questions are tested on a certain math concept

D. every question is tested on a certain math concept

E. each question is tested on a certain math concept
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2005, 14:20
E for me

A- would prefer sth like- "each question TESTS on a certain math concept" or " each question IS a test on a certain math concept ".
further if " a test on a certain math concept" in "A" is a appositive then it should be separated from rest of the sentence by a "comma"

B - seems like saying that all the 37 questions tests on a SINGLE math concept.

C & D - same as B.

hence E
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2005, 14:31
I go with E.

Dont' quite understand the meaning of A
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 [#permalink] New post 04 Apr 2005, 17:55
The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each question a test of a certain math concept.

A. each question a test on a certain math concept
- I'll take A. singular 'a' for singular 'each question'

B. all the questions a test on a certain math concept
- Prefer A over B.

C. all the questions are tested on a certain math concept
- Wrong logic. Sounds like questions were tested before they were released to the GMAT for testing students on their math abilities

D. every question is tested on a certain math concept
- Wrong logic. Same as C

E. each question is tested on a certain math concept
- Wrong logic. Same as C.

A it is.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Apr 2005, 00:18
It's similar to OG's
Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens of thousands of ideographic character, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.
OA is A. Is "each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame" an absolute phrase?
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Re: SC: a test on a certain math concept [#permalink] New post 05 Apr 2005, 14:10
inga wrote:
7. The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each question a test of a certain math concept.

A. each question a test on a certain math concept

B. all the questions a test on a certain math concept

C. all the questions are tested on a certain math concept

D. every question is tested on a certain math concept

E. each question is tested on a certain math concept


opps, guess "question" in A is a verb, I thought it was a "Noun"
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Re: SC: a test on a certain math concept [#permalink] New post 05 Apr 2005, 16:28
DLMD wrote:
inga wrote:
7. The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each question a test of a certain math concept.

A. each question a test on a certain math concept

B. all the questions a test on a certain math concept

C. all the questions are tested on a certain math concept

D. every question is tested on a certain math concept

E. each question is tested on a certain math concept


opps, guess "question" in A is a verb, I thought it was a "Noun"


don't think "question" is a verb, else it wud say "each questions"
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Re: SC: a test on a certain math concept [#permalink] New post 07 Apr 2005, 11:32
banerjeea_98 wrote:
DLMD wrote:
inga wrote:
7. The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each question a test of a certain math concept.

A. each question a test on a certain math concept

B. all the questions a test on a certain math concept

C. all the questions are tested on a certain math concept

D. every question is tested on a certain math concept

E. each question is tested on a certain math concept


opps, guess "question" in A is a verb, I thought it was a "Noun"


don't think "question" is a verb, else it wud say "each questions"


Exactly. If question was used as a verb and is used in its correct form, the choice would still be wrong, because you can't connect two complete sentences with a comma.
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Re: SC: a test on a certain math concept [#permalink] New post 07 Apr 2005, 15:07
HongHu wrote:
banerjeea_98 wrote:
DLMD wrote:
inga wrote:
7. The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each question a test of a certain math concept.

A. each question a test on a certain math concept

B. all the questions a test on a certain math concept

C. all the questions are tested on a certain math concept

D. every question is tested on a certain math concept

E. each question is tested on a certain math concept


opps, guess "question" in A is a verb, I thought it was a "Noun"


don't think "question" is a verb, else it wud say "each questions"


Exactly. If question was used as a verb and is used in its correct form, the choice would still be wrong, because you can't connect two complete sentences with a comma.


I still don't get why A is right. in A, "each question a test on a certain math concept" doesn't have a verb, how could it be right? Please clarify. Thanks
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Re: SC: a test on a certain math concept [#permalink] New post 07 Apr 2005, 18:45
DLMD wrote:
HongHu wrote:
banerjeea_98 wrote:
DLMD wrote:
inga wrote:
7. The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each question a test of a certain math concept.

A. each question a test on a certain math concept

B. all the questions a test on a certain math concept

C. all the questions are tested on a certain math concept

D. every question is tested on a certain math concept

E. each question is tested on a certain math concept


opps, guess "question" in A is a verb, I thought it was a "Noun"


don't think "question" is a verb, else it wud say "each questions"


Exactly. If question was used as a verb and is used in its correct form, the choice would still be wrong, because you can't connect two complete sentences with a comma.


I still don't get why A is right. in A, "each question a test on a certain math concept" doesn't have a verb, how could it be right? Please clarify. Thanks


Hi, if it has a verb, then it needs a conjunctive. So, the latter sentence plays a appositive role.
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2005, 09:11
but what i know, appositives are always separated by "commas", but this is not the case here.

any one would like to comment.
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Apr 2005, 10:22
dipaksingh wrote:
but what i know, appositives are always separated by "commas"


This is an example of Absolute phrase (Noun + Modifier), which modifies (or describes) whole sentence.
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 [#permalink] New post 18 Jun 2005, 17:13
dipaksingh wrote:
but what i know, appositives are always separated by "commas", but this is not the case here.

any one would like to comment.


Appositives are NOT always set off by commas.

Consider this: Pop star Michael Jackson is acquitted by the jury.

"Pop Star" is an appositive which modifies the noun "Michael Jackson".

Someone in wikipedia wrote that the appositives are classified into two categories:

Restrictive: no comma is needed (It is similar to restrictive clause)
Non-restrictive: comma is needed (It is similar to non-restrictive clause)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appositive
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Re: SC: a test on a certain math concept [#permalink] New post 18 Jun 2005, 20:07
DLMD wrote:
The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each question a test of a certain math concept.


I still don't get why A is right. in A, "each question a test on a certain math concept" doesn't have a verb, how could it be right? Please clarify. Thanks


There is a verb, but it is ellipsed (assumed, but not explicitly there).

The "true" sentence says this:

The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each question [being] a test of a certain math concept.

It is a common and correct construction to ellipse verbs like that.
(But caution, that doesn't mean you can go around ellipsing everything in sight and calling it correct.)

Examples,
The squadron had 10 pilots, each one a veteran flier.
The basketball team had two centers, each a seven-footer.
The shipment arrived with 100 shirts, each one the wrong color.
Re: SC: a test on a certain math concept   [#permalink] 18 Jun 2005, 20:07
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