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The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each

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The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2004, 09:03
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A
B
C
D
E

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(N/A)

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The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each question a test of a certain math concept.
A. each question a test on a certain math concept

B. all the questions a test on a certain math concept

C. all the questions are tested on a certain math concept

D. every question is tested on a certain math concept

E. each question is tested on a certain math concept
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Re: SC GMAT Math [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2004, 09:28
E.
one-to-one relationship. 1 question tests one math concept.
C and D generalizes that all/every question is based on one math concept (many-to-one relation).

anyway, is this question copyrighted 'boksana'?
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2004, 09:39
boksana wrote:
Nope!


The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each question a test of a certain math concept.

it is A. each question (singular) a test (singular). But, i believe, a semi-colon is required not a comma.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2004, 09:54
without the ; my ans ....

C ... as it says 37 qeuationz , so we need a plural to go with th parallel method..hence C wud be fine...

anyway let me know If I m wrong

hope that helps!
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2004, 09:55
Yes, it's A. DJ you are wrong, coma is fine. Please take a look at 122 OG

Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens of thousands of ideographic character, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2004, 09:56
OOPS...

read the question worng!...agree with dj on this!

A should be it!
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2004, 10:45
boksana wrote:
Chinese, the most ancient of living writing systems, consists of tens of thousands of ideographic character, each character a miniature calligraphic composition inside its own square frame.


the last sentence in your example is used as an appositive (parenthetical element) and aids in better understanding of what has been discussed (ideographic characters in this case).

Quote:
The GMAT math section consists of 37 questions, each question a test of a certain math concept.


But, I don't think, the same holds correct for our original sentence. It has two independent clauses that are required to be separated by a semi-colon or a full-stop.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2004, 10:54
I didn't make up this question (about math in Gmat). It's from a prep book. :roll: So I'll not argue with you.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2004, 13:44
Dj, the same concept for the chinese example does apply to the current question. In both examples, the appositive phrase (as a noun phrase) gives an extra piece of information to the one independent clause.

"each question a test of a certain math concept" is NOT an independent clause since it does not make sense on its own. "each" has no referent and makes sense only as a noun phrase (a sentence which has no verb and is meant to give extra information to the independent clause) by refering to some previous noun; in this case "questions"
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2004, 17:00
my bad :shock: . Paul, you are right, these two are not independent.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Jul 2004, 23:52
E is correct. For A, "each question" should be "each questions"
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2004, 00:51
(E) is for sure wrong, it changes the meaning. Sentence is trying to say that each question test [you] on a prticular concept of maths. While (E) implies that each question is tested ON a particular concept of math, (Which to me sounds as if it is the question and not the test taker who is tested.)

(A) is best.

Any comments!!
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2004, 01:16
Nope. It can't be A. If you take "question" for a noun --> there's no verb in the phrase. The answer should have enough Subject & Verb so I take E as my answer.
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2004, 05:56
Please ask yourself "Who is tested?". The answer is "The person answering the question is tested, but not the question itslef". So, E is comfortably ruled out.


bigtooth81 wrote:
Nope. It can't be A. If you take "question" for a noun --> there's no verb in the phrase. The answer should have enough Subject & Verb so I take E as my answer.

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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2004, 06:23
bigtooth81 wrote:
Nope. It can't be A. If you take "question" for a noun --> there's no verb in the phrase. The answer should have enough Subject & Verb so I take E as my answer.

Quote:
each question a test of a certain math concept

The above does not have a verb indeed. It is what is called a noun phrase and which in and of itself does not have a verb.
Ex: Peter, a teacher from Texas, is an excellent tax payer.
What is in red plays the same role as what "each question a test of a certain math concept" does. You may want to read a bit about noun phrases and their function:
http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/phrases.htm#noun
read the example in the appositive phrase section also as there is an example of the above
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Jul 2004, 18:12
Thanks for your explaination. By the way, I dobt ETS could take this one as standard English for the GMAT
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  [#permalink] 09 Jul 2004, 18:12
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