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The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas

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The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2004, 02:35
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A
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53% (01:48) correct 47% (00:58) wrong based on 538 sessions
The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have even a greater significance for the economy than the particulars of the plan.

(A) even a greater significance for the economy than
(B) a significance that is even greater for the economy than
(C) even greater significance for the economy than have
(D) even greater significance for the economy than do
(E) a significance even greater for the economy than have
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the [#permalink] New post 14 Jan 2012, 13:57
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Good work, folks! It seems that people are (correctly) aligned on D now, but I was asked to comment, so here's my take:

I think what makes this problem confusing is that the words "have" and "do" have so many possible roles in a sentence. Let's clarify things with an example:

I like pie more than my brothers.

What does this sentence mean? Do I prefer pie to my brothers, or do I enjoy eating pie more than my brothers do?

Now, we could clear up this ambiguity by saying “I like pie more than my brothers like pie.” This wouldn’t be grammatically incorrect, but there’s a shorter, more stylish, and more GMAT-like way to say this:

I like pie more than my brothers do.

Here, the word “do” stands in for the idea “like pie.”

Now, what about the following?

I have more love for pies than my brothers do.

Here, we are still using “do” to stand in for the preceding verb phrase: in this case, “have love for pies.” (We can substitute the verb phrase without including the comparative word “more.”) We don’t want to use the word “have”—it would not sound great to say “I have more love for pies than my brothers have.”

So we can already see how the word “do” can stand in for the word “have.” This is NOT the case if “have” is used to indicate the present perfect, as in the following:

I have been going to the gym lately.

Now, if I want to compare myself to my brothers, I will need to use the present perfect for both my verb and theirs. I do this by saying “have” twice.

I have been going to the gym more than my brothers have.

The second “have” (at the end of the sentence) functions just like “do” in the present tense does. It stands for the verb phrase “have been going to the gym.”

As a side note, I should point out that the GMAT often places the second verb BEFORE its subject, like this:

I have more pies than do my brothers.
I have been going to the gym more often than have my brothers.


This is fine, and entails no change in meaning.

Now, back to the original sentence. Here, “have” is NOT being used to indicate present perfect. It is part of the phrase “could have . . . significance.” So let’s write a simple sentence to parallel this one:

I might have more of an impact on the election than do my brothers.

If, instead, I say “I might have more of an impact on the election than have my brothers,” it sounds like I am speaking about them in the present perfect. I’d be saying that I might have more of an impact (in the future) than my brothers have had (so far). That’s the same mistake we’d be making if we chose C or E on this problem. We don't want to say that the principles could (in the future) have more significance than the particulars have (up to now).

Hopefully now, those with concerns can see why D works. The word “do” is actually filling in for the verb phrase “have significance.”

By the way, we need “do”--rather than nothing--to avoid ambiguity. A & B pose this problem in different ways.

B: “The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have a significance that is even greater for the economy than the particulars of the plan.” There are a few ways to read this sentence (and that's the problem), but to me it seems like we’re saying that the significance of the principles could be better for the economy than the particulars are. We should be saying that the principles are more significant (or “greater in significance”) than the particulars.

In A, we have two problems. First, the word order is wrong—“could have even a greater” just doesn’t work, because “even” seems to be modifying the verb “have” instead of the adjective “greater,” as it should. Second, without our helper “do,” we still have some ambiguity. A could be read as “The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have an even greater significance for the economy than FOR the particulars of the plan.” In other words, without a clarifying word (either the “for” that I just added, or the “do” that we add in D), we aren’t sure which interpretation to go with.

I hope this helps! Let me know if I can clarify anything.
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Jun 2004, 21:48
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The proper comparison would be:

The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department COULD have even a greater significance for the economy than COULD the particulars of the plan.

I think C and D distort the picture.
A says that the Treasury Department could have the particulars of the plan. Wrong again.

Finally, I opt for D.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jun 2004, 05:32
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I also opt for D
"do" is necessary here to compare same actions

could have<< even greater significance for the economy than do >> the particulars of the plan

equivalent to:

could have even greater significance for the economy than the particulars of the plan do [have]
"have" is ellipsed here and "do" ensures that we are not comparing "economy" to "the particulars of the plan".
"do" properly compares
the "significance" of the "guiding principles of the tax plan"
to
the "significance" of the "particulars of the plan"

Let's see how this fits D

The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have even greater significance for the economy than do the particulars of the plan
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Re: SC: do or have? [#permalink] New post 14 Mar 2009, 08:14
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D.
The "have" in the stem is not an auxiliary verb. If it were, then you could consider C.
cici wrote:
The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have even a greater significance for the economy than the particulars of the plan.

(A) even a greater significance for the economy than
(B) a significance that is even greater for the economy than
(C) even greater significance for the economy than have
(D) even greater significance for the economy than do
(E) a significance even greater for the economy than have
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Re: guiding principle [#permalink] New post 14 May 2010, 06:21
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calvin,

You may want to take a look at the link
doubt-from-manhattan-sc-93768.html

I have given some explaination for such issues. Refer the example # 2.


calvinhobbes wrote:
Any moderators who can weigh in??

Why is "could have" parallel to "do"?

WHich one of the following is correct?
1. I can do this better than you can
2. I can do this better than you do

Isn't it 1 and 2 are different in meanings?

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Re: SC Sense [#permalink] New post 24 Mar 2011, 00:00
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A- compares significance to the particulars of the plan.
B- even greater wrongly modifies the economy. (significance is greater here)
C - same prb as A,plus not sure the use of have here. if it refers to significance shud be single has.
D - correct, use of do after than makes the comaprision parallel.
E- same as B
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan [#permalink] New post 16 Jun 2012, 08:52
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Ankit04041987 wrote:
The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have even a greater significance for the economy than the particulars of the plan.
(A) even a greater significance for the economy than
(B) a significance that is even greater for the economy than
(C) even greater significance for the economy than have
(D) even greater significance for the economy than do
(E) a significance even greater for the economy than have

Here both C and D are correct, although the answer would be D.

For the convenience we can write the answers as follows:

The guiding principles (of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department) could have even greater significance (for the economy) than have the particulars of the plan.

The guiding principles (of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department) could have even greater significance (for the economy) than do the particulars of the plan.
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The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the [#permalink] New post 19 Dec 2012, 06:45
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The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have
even a greater significance for the economy than the particulars of the plan.
(A) even a greater significance for the economy than
(B) a significance that is even greater for the economy than
(C) even greater significance for the economy than have
(D) even greater significance for the economy than do
(E) a significance even greater for the economy than have
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink] New post 12 May 2013, 03:12
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In this type of questions, meaning of the sentence plays a crucial role.

In this question, first we need to find which parts are compared:
Is the comparison between “guiding principles of the tax plan” and “particulars of the plan”
OR
Is the comparison between “significance of guiding principles on the economy” and “significance of particulars on the economy”?

After judging the meaning, it can be seen that the comparison should be between “significance of guiding principles on the economy” and “significance of particulars on the economy”.

To make the comparison proper, we need have the construction as “… economy than do the particulars of the plan.”
Point to note: “have” in non-underlined part is not used as present perfect. So, if “do” is replaced by “have”, the sentence will have distorted meaning.

A) “Significance for the economy” is compared to “particulars of the plan”. Incorrect option.
B) “Significance” is compared to “particulars of the plan”. Also, “significance” is non-countable and hence “a significance” in ungrammatical. Incorrect option.
C) Introduction of second “have” is distorting the meaning. The construction “X could have greater Y than have Z” is grammatically incorrect and it does not convey the desired comparison. Incorrect option.
D) Correct. Here then sentence is meaningful and contains right comparison.
E) Introduction of second “have” is distorting the meaning. The construction “X could have Y greater than have Z” is grammatically incorrect and it does not convey the desired comparison. Also, “significance” is non-countable and hence “a significance” in ungrammatical. Incorrect option.

Correct option is D.
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 [#permalink] New post 10 Apr 2004, 10:02
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Apr 2004, 12:36
I would like to know why you chose D over C. If you give the right answer then you can be confident that slight twist in the sentence wont make you guess the answer.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Apr 2004, 15:59
the only difference between C and D is than have and than do.
When the same verb is repeated it is better to have DO verbs.
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 [#permalink] New post 16 Apr 2004, 17:19
Hi Geethu,

You are quite right. "have" is the main verb here. It can also function as a helping verb or auxilary verb. This verb should be in parallel with another verb. That verb is "do"

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than do/have [#permalink] New post 23 Jun 2004, 20:59
6.The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have<< even a greater significance for the economy than>> the particulars of the plan.
(A) even a greater significance for the economy than
(B) a significance that is even greater for the economy than
(C) even greater significance for the economy than have
(D) even greater significance for the economy than do
(E) a significance even greater for the economy than have

I am confused between C and D .Can anybody explain clearly when to use do or have or anything after THAN..i mean how to decide .I usually get confused in these types of questions.
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jun 2004, 01:38
(D) is best.

(Sorry I don't have explanation for usage of "do" and "have", but (D) sounds good to ears)

Anybody who can explain the usage of "do" and "have"
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Jun 2004, 05:47
Paul wrote:
I also opt for D
"do" is necessary here to compare same actions

could have<< even greater significance for the economy than do >> the particulars of the plan

equivalent to:

could have even greater significance for the economy than the particulars of the plan do [have]
"have" is ellipsed here and "do" ensures that we are not comparing "economy" to "the particulars of the plan".
"do" properly compares
the "significance" of the "guiding principles of the tax plan"
to
the "significance" of the "particulars of the plan"

Let's see how this fits D

The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have even greater significance for the economy than do the particulars of the plan


Great explanation Paul! :-D

Can you explain what 'ellipsed' mean? I haven't heard this expression before, however, I've observed that you use it quite a bit.

Thanks.
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The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2004, 13:38
The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have even a greater significance for the economy than the particulars of the plan
(A) even a greater significance for the economy than
(B) a significance that is even greater for the economy than
(C) even greater significance for the economy than have
(D) even greater significance for the economy than do
(E) a significance even greater for the economy than have
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 [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2004, 14:26
B it is
"even" should stress "greater", not "significance"
"that" is required to introduce restrictive clause with verb "is". Also, second verb "have" can be ellipsed.
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Re: SC - Treasury department [#permalink] New post 11 Sep 2004, 21:41
D for me too. It seems right to the ear!!!

Anyways, can anyone give a grammatical explanation on why D is better than C or why we need "do" instead of "have"

Thanks
Re: SC - Treasury department   [#permalink] 11 Sep 2004, 21:41
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