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The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and

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The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and [#permalink] New post 03 Oct 2010, 07:17
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The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and rearing back, broadens the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does, feigning repeated strikes, but having no dangerous fangs and no venom, eventually, if its pursuer is not cowered by the performance, will fall over and play dead.

- broadens the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does, feigning repeated strikes, but having no dangerous fangs and no venom,
- broadens the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does and feigns repeated strikes, but with no dangerous fangs and no venom,
- broadening the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does and feigning repeated strikes, but it has no dangerous fangs and no venom, and
- broadening the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does and feigns repeated strikes, but with no dangerous fangs and no venom, and
- broadening the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does, feigning repeated strikes, but with no dangerous fangs and no venom, and


The question has been discussed many times, but one point is unclear for me:
MGMAT instructor said that the meaning of the sentence clearly indicates that the forms of broaden and feign should be parallel to "hissing and rearing", since all of those things are actions that occur during the "impressive bluff". But why? How these 2 words define parallelism? For me, these 2 words should be paralleled to each other, without influencing other words, which have their own parallelism story... And it's way better to say broadens... So, for me structure in B is preferrable... Please anybody explain.


Thanks!
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by pqhai on 15 Dec 2013, 11:00, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Snake (750+) [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2010, 11:11
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"Puts on an impressive bluff" is the category or heading into which all of the other actions fall. As a result, all the subsequent verbs that fall into the category of describing the snake's bluff must be parallel. In other words: The snake puts on a bluff BY hissing, rearing, broadening, and feigning.

Another example would be:

I worked at the factory making widgets, getting paid minimum wage, and breathing dirty air.

Here, "making" "getting paid" and "breathing" are all examples of things that fall into the category "things that happened WHILE I was working at the factory." As a result, all three of these things must be parallel to each other, but not to the main verb "worked."

It would also be grammatically correct to say: "I worked at the factory, made widgets, got paid minimum wage, and breathed dirty air." The difference is that in this sentence there is no indication that the last three things occurred WHILE I worked at the factory. Instead, these could be four entirely separate activities that all occurred in sequence.

Does this help?
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Re: Snake (750+) [#permalink] New post 03 Oct 2010, 07:42
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Here is how I would break the structure of sentence to understand it more.
Code:
The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff,
                hissing and rearing back,
                broadens the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does,
                feigning repeated strikes,
     but having no dangerous fangs and no venom,
     eventually, if its pursuer is not cowered by the performance, will fall over and play dead.


as you can see now, second, third and fourth line explain or gives an example of how the snake puts an impressive buff. As you can see, it is the form, "A, B and C" where A, B and C needs to be in parallel, as well as, requires the word "and" before the third one.

now, remove these three lines, and focus on the "snake puts an impressive buff, but ..." here again, you need parallel structure to "snake puts", and it is "it has" (note has is a verb here, and not a helping verb such as "has completed")

I would select "C" for this.

hope this helps.
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Re: Snake (750+) [#permalink] New post 03 Oct 2010, 17:38
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BlitzHN wrote:
E

you are right with the a, b and c part but, there is a d also whichi is the dropping dead part. hence the and should come before eventually


For E, "and" is missing before "feigning" - the third and last parallel part.
Also, the construction "but with" is awkward.

I agree with you on having "and" before "eventually". This is present in answer C - which IMO is correct answer.
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Re: The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and [#permalink] New post 16 Dec 2013, 10:57
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Hi Paris, "but" is a coordinating conjunction (CC) in option C and a CC joins two clauses definitely a clause must have a subject proper noun or pronoun type, here "it" is acting as a subject. Therefore C is right.
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Re: Snake (750+) [#permalink] New post 03 Oct 2010, 16:34
E

you are right with the a, b and c part but, there is a d also whichi is the dropping dead part. hence the and should come before eventually
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Re: Snake (750+) [#permalink] New post 03 Oct 2010, 17:46
Using the split and re-split principle, and following the fact that hissing and rearing make use of the gerund, we know that the bluff and feign should follow a gerund too (parallel structure), so that rules out options A and B. This is parallelism because you're looking at the construction with three verbs which must follow the same tense and structure.

Now look at C, D and E:

Financier wrote:
,
- broadening the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does and feigning repeated strikes, but it has no dangerous fangs and no venom, and : This is correct, since it follows the parallel structure and uses the word and for the final verb.
- broadening the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does and feigns repeated strikes, but with no dangerous fangs and no venom, and Incorrect since feigns doesn't follow parallel structure
- broadening the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does, feigning repeated strikes, but with no dangerous fangs and no venom, and Incorrect since it doesn't use the word and for the last verb, feigning.


What's the right answer?
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Re: Snake (750+) [#permalink] New post 03 Oct 2010, 20:50
whiplash2411 wrote:

What's the right answer?


Thanks! The answer is "C".
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Re: Snake (750+) [#permalink] New post 05 Oct 2010, 11:24
BKimball wrote:
"Puts on an impressive bluff" is the category or heading into which all of the other actions fall. As a result, all the subsequent verbs that fall into the category of describing the snake's bluff must be parallel. In other words: The snake puts on a bluff BY hissing, rearing, broadening, and feigning.

Another example would be:

I worked at the factory making widgets, getting paid minimum wage, and breathing dirty air.

Here, "making" "getting paid" and "breathing" are all examples of things that fall into the category "things that happened WHILE I was working at the factory." As a result, all three of these things must be parallel to each other, but not to the main verb "worked."

It would also be grammatically correct to say: "I worked at the factory, made widgets, got paid minimum wage, and breathed dirty air." The difference is that in this sentence there is no indication that the last three things occurred WHILE I worked at the factory. Instead, these could be four entirely separate activities that all occurred in sequence.

Does this help?


Thanks! Kudos! Now I DO understand :)
Your comment also cleared very similar issue I just posted in another thread.
nato-102282.html

Good job, thanks!
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Re: Snake (750+) [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2010, 06:40
This is a question from OG:

While some propose to combat widespread illegal copying of computer programs by attempting to change people's attitudes toward pirating, others by suggesting reducing software prices to decrease the incentive for pirating, and still others by calling for the prosecution of those who copy software illegally.

(A) by suggesting reducing software prices to decrease the incentive for pirating, and still others by calling
(B) by suggesting the reduction of software prices to decrease the incentive for pirating, and still others call
(C) suggest the reduction of software prices for decreasing the incentive for pirating, and still others call
(D) suggest the reduction of software prices to decrease the incentive for pirating, and still others by calling
(E) suggest reducing software prices to decrease the incentive for pirating, and still others are calling

The OA is (E) and the question has already been discussed 2 times. The only reasonable explanation given is this:
"propose attempting ....., suggest reducing .... and still others are calling".

But how does this parallelism work? Yes, we see attempting, reducing and calling, but in my view, we should make parallel propose, suggest, and some other word in the third element. So, for me (C) works much better, unless there's a need to subordinate the end of the sentence as it was the case in the "Snake" case. Can anybody clarify? Thanks.
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Re: Snake (750+) [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2010, 10:19
Financier wrote:
This is a question from OG:

While some propose to combat widespread illegal copying of computer programs by attempting to change people's attitudes toward pirating, others by suggesting reducing software prices to decrease the incentive for pirating, and still others by calling for the prosecution of those who copy software illegally.

(A) by suggesting reducing software prices to decrease the incentive for pirating, and still others by calling
(B) by suggesting the reduction of software prices to decrease the incentive for pirating, and still others call
(C) suggest the reduction of software prices for decreasing the incentive for pirating, and still others call
(D) suggest the reduction of software prices to decrease the incentive for pirating, and still others by calling
(E) suggest reducing software prices to decrease the incentive for pirating, and still others are calling

The OA is (E) and the question has already been discussed 2 times. The only reasonable explanation given is this:
"propose attempting ....., suggest reducing .... and still others are calling".

But how does this parallelism work? Yes, we see attempting, reducing and calling, but in my view, we should make parallel propose, suggest, and some other word in the third element. So, for me (C) works much better, unless there's a need to subordinate the end of the sentence as it was the case in the "Snake" case. Can anybody clarify? Thanks.



In C everything is parallel
There are three groups/structures:
- some propose [what]to combat widespread illegal copying of computer programs [how] by attempting to change people's attitudes toward pirating - [is a noun]
- others suggest [what] the reduction of software prices for decreasing [noun] the incentive for pirating [is a noun]
-and still others call [for what] for the prosecution of those who copy software illegally

hope this helps :)
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Re: Snake (750+) [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2010, 10:50
wtf?! OA is E,! :?
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Re: Snake (750+) [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2010, 11:08
Pkit wrote:
wtf?! OA is E,! :?


This is the KEY:
Choice C, however, introduces the nonidiomatic for decreasing.
So, now we know that idioms sometimes are more important then parallelism...
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Re: Snake (750+) [#permalink] New post 19 Oct 2010, 11:20
Financier wrote:
Pkit wrote:
wtf?! OA is E,! :?


This is the KEY:
Choice C, however, introduces the nonidiomatic for decreasing.
So, now we know that idioms sometimes are more important then parallelism...


ok,

both C and E are wrong, but C is wronger according to the GMAT. - "stong logic".

yeah, "for decreasing" is [strike]wrong[/strike] not so correct, I have missed it but, are calling is completly not parallel and this is wrong as well.

I am not complaining but this is a a GMAT b*llsh*t as for me.
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Re: The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and [#permalink] New post 27 Nov 2011, 21:21
I ahve a question here ,
if I consider (c) as correct, the question becomes :

"The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and rearing back, broadening the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does and feigning repeated strikes, but it has no dangerous fangs and no venom, and eventually, if its pursuer is not cowed by the performance,(it) will fall over and play dead."

Don't you think that there should be a "it" in the place where I have mentioned above ?

Or the sentence is correct, and I can assume that "it" here can be silent. Please comment.
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Re: The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and [#permalink] New post 15 Jun 2012, 15:10
Financier wrote:
The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and rearing back, broadens the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does, feigning repeated strikes, but having no dangerous fangs and no venom, eventually, if its pursuer is not cowered by the performance, will fall over and play dead.

- broadens the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does, feigning repeated strikes, but having no dangerous fangs and no venom,
- broadens the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does and feigns repeated strikes, but with no dangerous fangs and no venom,
- broadening the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does and feigning repeated strikes, but it has no dangerous fangs and no venom, and
- broadening the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does and feigns repeated strikes, but with no dangerous fangs and no venom, and
- broadening the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does, feigning repeated strikes, but with no dangerous fangs and no venom, and


The question has been discussed many times, but one point is unclear for me:
MGMAT instructor said that the meaning of the sentence clearly indicates that the forms of broaden and feign should be parallel to "hissing and rearing", since all of those things are actions that occur during the "impressive bluff". But why? How these 2 words define parallelism? For me, these 2 words should be paralleled to each other, without influencing other words, which have their own parallelism story... And it's way better to say broadens... So, for me structure in B is preferrable... Please anybody explain.


Thanks!

The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and rearing back, broadens the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does, feigning repeated strikes, but having no dangerous fangs and no venom, eventually, if its pursuer is not cowered by the performance, will fall over and play dead.
If you cut out the fluff, the sentence becomes more clear and you can see the error. The sentence means to say that a certain snake puts on an impressive bluff, broadening....thus, C is the correct answer
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Re: The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and [#permalink] New post 15 Jun 2012, 16:56
My thought process. Took about 50 seconds:

Snake puts on Bluff. Rest is description of bluff and needs to be parallel. Hissing/rearing, therefore also need broadening/feigning/having. Let's eliminate all that don't match.

A - eliminate
B - eliminate
C - keep
D - eliminate
E - keep

C and E remain. Quick check of each:

C: "broadening the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does and feigning repeated strikes, but it has no dangerous fangs and no venom, and"
E: "broadening the flesh behind its head the way a cobra does, feigning repeated strikes, but with no dangerous fangs and no venom, and"

Let's eliminate E based on the "but with no dangerous fangs and no venom, and..."

C is all that remains. Doesn't matter how well it works.
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Re: The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and [#permalink] New post 14 Dec 2013, 21:08
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Re: The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and [#permalink] New post 16 Dec 2013, 10:38
Hi all,

does the "IT" in answer C redundant?

I have clearly identify the different causes, but for me "it" was redundant and therefore the answer was wrong...

Where did I get it wrong?
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Re: The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and [#permalink] New post 16 Dec 2013, 13:38
PiyushK wrote:
Hi Paris, "but" is a coordinating conjunction (CC) in option C and a CC joins two clauses definitely a clause must have a subject proper noun or pronoun type, here "it" is acting as a subject. Therefore C is right.


Thanks did not know that rule about the CC!
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Re: The hognose snake puts on an impressive bluff, hissing and   [#permalink] 16 Dec 2013, 13:38
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