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The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 3

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The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 3 [#permalink] New post 03 Sep 2012, 05:14
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The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 32 centimeters wide, and 15 centimeters high. The carton is filled to capacity with k identical cylindrical cans of fruit that stand upright in rows and columns, as indicated in the figure above. If the cans are 15 centimeters high, what is the value of k?

(1) Each of the cans has a radius of 4 centimeters.
(2) Six of the cans fit exactly along the length of the carton.

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Re: The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 3 [#permalink] New post 03 Sep 2012, 05:23
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Bunuel wrote:

The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 32 centimeters wide, and 15 centimeters high. The carton is filled to capacity with k identical cylindrical cans of fruit that stand upright in rows and columns, as indicated in the figure above. If the cans are 15 centimeters high, what is the value of k?

(1) Each of the cans has a radius of 4 centimeters.
(2) Six of the cans fit exactly along the length of the carton.



Since Height of Box and Height of Cans are equal so only one stack of cans is there in the box. No need to bother about height.
So inside dimensions of Box = 48 X 32
St 1: Sufficient: Each can has radius of 4 = Dia is 8 cms. ie (48/8) 6 nos of cans can be in one row. And since cans are identical (32/8) ie 4 cans can fit in colums. So 24 nos of can can fit in box.
St 2: Sufficient: 6 cans can fit along the length. ie dia of each can = 48/6 ie 8 cms. As discussed in St 1.

Hence Answer is D)
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Re: The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 3 [#permalink] New post 03 Sep 2012, 05:14
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The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 32 centimeters wide, and 15 centimeters high. The carton is filled to capacity with k identical cylindrical cans of fruit that stand upright in rows and columns, as indicated in the figure above. If the cans are 15 centimeters high, what is the value of k?

(1) Each of the cans has a radius of 4 centimeters --> radius=4 means that diameter=8, which implies that along the 48 centimeter length of the carton 48/8=6 cans can be placed and along the 32 centimeter width of the carton 32/8=4 cans can be placed. Thus, k=6*4=24. Sufficient.

(2) Six of the cans fit exactly along the length of the carton --> the diameter of the can is 48/6=8 centimeters. So, we have the same info as above. Sufficient.

Answer: D.
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COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS:
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DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS ; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


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Re: The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 3 [#permalink] New post 07 Sep 2012, 05:22
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SOLUTION

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The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 32 centimeters wide, and 15 centimeters high. The carton is filled to capacity with k identical cylindrical cans of fruit that stand upright in rows and columns, as indicated in the figure above. If the cans are 15 centimeters high, what is the value of k?

(1) Each of the cans has a radius of 4 centimeters --> radius=4 means that diameter=8, which implies that along the 48 centimeter length of the carton 48/8=6 cans can be placed and along the 32 centimeter width of the carton 32/8=4 cans can be placed. Thus, k=6*4=24. Sufficient.

(2) Six of the cans fit exactly along the length of the carton --> the diameter of the can is 48/6=8 centimeters. So, we have the same info as above. Sufficient.

Answer: D.

Kudos points given to everyone with correct solution. Let me know if I missed someone.
_________________

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PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 11 Rules for Posting!!!

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COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS ; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


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Re: The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 3 [#permalink] New post 24 Apr 2013, 01:53
Bunuel wrote:
SOLUTION

Image
The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 32 centimeters wide, and 15 centimeters high. The carton is filled to capacity with k identical cylindrical cans of fruit that stand upright in rows and columns, as indicated in the figure above. If the cans are 15 centimeters high, what is the value of k?

(1) Each of the cans has a radius of 4 centimeters --> radius=4 means that diameter=8, which implies that along the 48 centimeter length of the carton 48/8=6 cans can be placed and along the 32 centimeter width of the carton 32/8=4 cans can be placed. Thus, k=6*4=24. Sufficient.

(2) Six of the cans fit exactly along the length of the carton --> the diameter of the can is 48/6=8 centimeters. So, we have the same info as above. Sufficient.

Answer: D.

Kudos points given to everyone with correct solution. Let me know if I missed someone.


I know the measurement of the carton, which is 48*32. Now the can's radius is 4 cm. Although the height of the carton is the same as the height of the cans i.e. 15, which I am ignoring as it will eventually cancel out in the calculation. My question is around the solution that is provided in the O.G. They have simply divided the length of the carton by diameter and width by diameter and then further multiplied the result.

(48/8)*(32/8)
=6*4
=24.

Btw I got the right answer since its a DS problem. I am worried coz had this been a p.s problem, I might have got this one wrong.
Now the way I would have solved this is

1st find the circumference of the circle (eliminating the height as the it is same). 2IIr=2*22/7*4
and then divided it by (48*32)/(176/7). My answer in this case is different from the OA =61.09

Why II (pie) was not considered. Why circumference was not considered instead of diameter. I failed to understand this. Can you please explain this.

Further when I use a formula for rectangle's area =L*B, where both lenght and breadth is present. But in case of circle I don't have a II(pie) anywhere. Why do we use this. What is the significance of II (pie).
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Re: The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 3 [#permalink] New post 24 Apr 2013, 04:38
Expert's post
davidfrank wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
SOLUTION

Image
The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 32 centimeters wide, and 15 centimeters high. The carton is filled to capacity with k identical cylindrical cans of fruit that stand upright in rows and columns, as indicated in the figure above. If the cans are 15 centimeters high, what is the value of k?

(1) Each of the cans has a radius of 4 centimeters --> radius=4 means that diameter=8, which implies that along the 48 centimeter length of the carton 48/8=6 cans can be placed and along the 32 centimeter width of the carton 32/8=4 cans can be placed. Thus, k=6*4=24. Sufficient.

(2) Six of the cans fit exactly along the length of the carton --> the diameter of the can is 48/6=8 centimeters. So, we have the same info as above. Sufficient.

Answer: D.

Kudos points given to everyone with correct solution. Let me know if I missed someone.


I know the measurement of the carton, which is 48*32. Now the can's radius is 4 cm. Although the height of the carton is the same as the height of the cans i.e. 15, which I am ignoring as it will eventually cancel out in the calculation. My question is around the solution that is provided in the O.G. They have simply divided the length of the carton by diameter and width by diameter and then further multiplied the result.

(48/8)*(32/8)
=6*4
=24.

Btw I got the right answer since its a DS problem. I am worried coz had this been a p.s problem, I might have got this one wrong.
Now the way I would have solved this is

1st find the circumference of the circle (eliminating the height as the it is same). 2IIr=2*22/7*4
and then divided it by (48*32)/(176/7). My answer in this case is different from the OA =61.09

Why II (pie) was not considered. Why circumference was not considered instead of diameter. I failed to understand this. Can you please explain this.

Further when I use a formula for rectangle's area =L*B, where both lenght and breadth is present. But in case of circle I don't have a II(pie) anywhere. Why do we use this. What is the significance of II (pie).


Why are you calculating the circumference?
_________________

NEW TO MATH FORUM? PLEASE READ THIS: ALL YOU NEED FOR QUANT!!!

PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 11 Rules for Posting!!!

RESOURCES: [GMAT MATH BOOK]; 1. Triangles; 2. Polygons; 3. Coordinate Geometry; 4. Factorials; 5. Circles; 6. Number Theory; 7. Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets; 9. PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders; 11. GMAT Prep Software Analysis NEW!!!; 12. SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) NEW!!!; 12. Tricky questions from previous years. NEW!!!;

COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS ; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


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Re: The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 3 [#permalink] New post 24 Apr 2013, 17:15
Straight forward question. You need to get the radius of the cylinders to get the number of cylinders. Both A and B help to calculate r. D wins.
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Re: The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 3 [#permalink] New post 26 Apr 2013, 21:38
Bunuel wrote:
davidfrank wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
SOLUTION

Image
The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 32 centimeters wide, and 15 centimeters high. The carton is filled to capacity with k identical cylindrical cans of fruit that stand upright in rows and columns, as indicated in the figure above. If the cans are 15 centimeters high, what is the value of k?

(1) Each of the cans has a radius of 4 centimeters --> radius=4 means that diameter=8, which implies that along the 48 centimeter length of the carton 48/8=6 cans can be placed and along the 32 centimeter width of the carton 32/8=4 cans can be placed. Thus, k=6*4=24. Sufficient.

(2) Six of the cans fit exactly along the length of the carton --> the diameter of the can is 48/6=8 centimeters. So, we have the same info as above. Sufficient.

Answer: D.

Kudos points given to everyone with correct solution. Let me know if I missed someone.


I know the measurement of the carton, which is 48*32. Now the can's radius is 4 cm. Although the height of the carton is the same as the height of the cans i.e. 15, which I am ignoring as it will eventually cancel out in the calculation. My question is around the solution that is provided in the O.G. They have simply divided the length of the carton by diameter and width by diameter and then further multiplied the result.

(48/8)*(32/8)
=6*4
=24.

Btw I got the right answer since its a DS problem. I am worried coz had this been a p.s problem, I might have got this one wrong.
Now the way I would have solved this is

1st find the circumference of the circle (eliminating the height as the it is same). 2IIr=2*22/7*4
and then divided it by (48*32)/(176/7). My answer in this case is different from the OA =61.09

Why II (pie) was not considered. Why circumference was not considered instead of diameter. I failed to understand this. Can you please explain this.

Further when I use a formula for rectangle's area =L*B, where both lenght and breadth is present. But in case of circle I don't have a II(pie) anywhere. Why do we use this. What is the significance of II (pie).


Why are you calculating the circumference?


Hi Bunuel,

I am calculating the circumference because I know the area of the rectangular (ignoring the height 15 cm as it is common to both can and carton). Once I know the area, I can divide the area by circumference of the circle to know the no of cans.
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Re: The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 3 [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2013, 04:32
Expert's post
davidfrank wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
davidfrank wrote:

I know the measurement of the carton, which is 48*32. Now the can's radius is 4 cm. Although the height of the carton is the same as the height of the cans i.e. 15, which I am ignoring as it will eventually cancel out in the calculation. My question is around the solution that is provided in the O.G. They have simply divided the length of the carton by diameter and width by diameter and then further multiplied the result.

(48/8)*(32/8)
=6*4
=24.

Btw I got the right answer since its a DS problem. I am worried coz had this been a p.s problem, I might have got this one wrong.
Now the way I would have solved this is

1st find the circumference of the circle (eliminating the height as the it is same). 2IIr=2*22/7*4
and then divided it by (48*32)/(176/7). My answer in this case is different from the OA =61.09

Why II (pie) was not considered. Why circumference was not considered instead of diameter. I failed to understand this. Can you please explain this.

Further when I use a formula for rectangle's area =L*B, where both lenght and breadth is present. But in case of circle I don't have a II(pie) anywhere. Why do we use this. What is the significance of II (pie).


Why are you calculating the circumference?


Hi Bunuel,

I am calculating the circumference because I know the area of the rectangular (ignoring the height 15 cm as it is common to both can and carton). Once I know the area, I can divide the area by circumference of the circle to know the no of cans.


It seems that you don't understand the question. You need neither circumference of the cans nor the area.

Simpler example might help:
Attachment:
Untitled.png
Untitled.png [ 10.24 KiB | Viewed 1544 times ]
The carton is 16 centimeters long and 16 centimeters wide. If the diameter of the cans is 8 centimeters, how many cans can be placed in the carton?
_________________

NEW TO MATH FORUM? PLEASE READ THIS: ALL YOU NEED FOR QUANT!!!

PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 11 Rules for Posting!!!

RESOURCES: [GMAT MATH BOOK]; 1. Triangles; 2. Polygons; 3. Coordinate Geometry; 4. Factorials; 5. Circles; 6. Number Theory; 7. Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets; 9. PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders; 11. GMAT Prep Software Analysis NEW!!!; 12. SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) NEW!!!; 12. Tricky questions from previous years. NEW!!!;

COLLECTION OF QUESTIONS:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS ; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


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Re: The inside of a rectangular carton is 48 centimeters long, 3   [#permalink] 27 Apr 2013, 04:32
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