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The Japanese haiku is defined as a poem of three lines with

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Director
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The Japanese haiku is defined as a poem of three lines with [#permalink] New post 27 Mar 2007, 09:47
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A
B
C
D
E

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The Japanese haiku is defined as a poem of three lines with five syllables in the first line, seven syllables in the second line, and five syllables in the third line. English poets tend to ignore this fact. Disregarding syllable count, they generally call any three-line English poem with a “haiku feelâ€
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Re: CR-The Japanese haiku [#permalink] New post 27 Mar 2007, 10:05
(A) is not true because no subjective feeling is mentioned in the text;
(B) - correct because the conclusion is too general, not enough evidence is given;
(C) out of scope;
(D) out of scope;
(E) does not reveal the flaw in the argument and also out of scope.

Btw, very nice CR :)
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Mar 2007, 01:22
I felt A and B were really close. I am shooting for A though.

Nick,
Isn't respect a subjective feeling?
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Mar 2007, 01:26
B is my choice. The author concludes that foreign poets has no respect for foreign traditions (which is broad in scope) simply because English poets call their poems a haiku as long as it has a 'haiku feel' to it.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Mar 2007, 03:07
Whats wrong with E??...they reject syllable count.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Mar 2007, 03:23
vineetgupta wrote:
Whats wrong with E??...they reject syllable count.


Quote:
(E) fails to acknowledge that ignoring something implies a negative judgment about that thing


Even if E were true - that ignoring something implies a negative judgment - the flaw in the argument would still remain because the conclusion is too broad based on the facts presented.

Even if English Poets have little regard for syllable count - we cannot say that they have little regard for foreign traditions - in fact they regard foreign traditions that's why they borrow the term Haiku - they just tailor its definition to suit their needs.
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Mar 2007, 04:02
mba07 wrote:
I felt A and B were really close. I am shooting for A though.

Nick,
Isn't respect a subjective feeling?


In my opinion, since they ask to find the flaw in the logical structure of the argument or in the text supporting the argument we should not take into account the mentioning of "disrespect" in the erroneous conclusion.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Mar 2007, 20:28
Thanks dwivedys for the explanation.
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Re: CR-The Japanese haiku [#permalink] New post 30 Mar 2007, 07:50
[quote="vineetgupta"]The Japanese haiku is defined as a poem of three lines with five syllables in the first line, seven syllables in the second line, and five syllables in the third line. English poets tend to ignore this fact. Disregarding syllable count, they generally call any three-line English poem with a “haiku feelâ€
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Mar 2007, 13:05
B.
  [#permalink] 30 Mar 2007, 13:05
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