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The loggers railway roadbed, with its narrow spurs jutting

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The loggers railway roadbed, with its narrow spurs jutting [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2006, 09:30
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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The loggers’ railway roadbed, with its narrow spurs jutting fingerlike into the swamp, had turned into a hazard for tourists visiting the area requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

A. that government officials agree to have the area razed.
B. that government officials agree for to have the area razed.
C. the agreeing by government officials to have the area razed.
D. government officials agreeing to have the area razed.
E. government officials to agree to have the area razed
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Re: SC: Logger's railway [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2006, 09:50
We need a noun after "requiring", so A, B and C are eliminated.


Out of D and E my choice is E. D sounds awkward to me.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2006, 10:08
E. government officials to agree to have the area razed

need to have agree instead of agreeing along with the noun requirement... E satisfies.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2006, 10:13
I also think E
I am confused too

Thinking why A is not correct ??
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2006, 12:35
The loggers’ railway roadbed, [with its narrow spurs jutting fingerlike into the swamp,] had turned [into a hazard for tourists visiting the area] requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

[...] eliminate all the prepositional phrases and you are left with

The loggers’ railway roadbed had turned requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

the roadbed had turned (WHOM/WHAT)... governement officials (TO DO WHAT) to agree blah-blah...


A and B "had turned that..." THAT doesn't work here
C. very awkward
D. agreeing to... unidiomatic "Agree to" or "Agree with" awkward
E. very clear

It is E...
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2006, 17:50
u2lover wrote:
The loggers’ railway roadbed, [with its narrow spurs jutting fingerlike into the swamp,] had turned [into a hazard for tourists visiting the area] requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

[...] eliminate all the prepositional phrases and you are left with

The loggers’ railway roadbed had turned requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

the roadbed had turned (WHOM/WHAT)... governement officials (TO DO WHAT) to agree blah-blah...


A and B "had turned that..." THAT doesn't work here
C. very awkward
D. agreeing to... unidiomatic "Agree to" or "Agree with" awkward
E. very clear

It is E...


I am very weak at SC, (not a native english speaker) bear with me...but am going to start positing so that I can learn...

One question, in E... 'to agree to have' if the answer choice was 'to agree and have' would this be wrong due to unidiomatic?
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2006, 19:01
acfuture wrote:
u2lover wrote:
The loggers’ railway roadbed, [with its narrow spurs jutting fingerlike into the swamp,] had turned [into a hazard for tourists visiting the area] requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

[...] eliminate all the prepositional phrases and you are left with

The loggers’ railway roadbed had turned requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

the roadbed had turned (WHOM/WHAT)... governement officials (TO DO WHAT) to agree blah-blah...


A and B "had turned that..." THAT doesn't work here
C. very awkward
D. agreeing to... unidiomatic "Agree to" or "Agree with" awkward
E. very clear

It is E...


I am very weak at SC, (not a native english speaker) bear with me...but am going to start positing so that I can learn...

One question, in E... 'to agree to have' if the answer choice was 'to agree and have' would this be wrong due to unidiomatic?


it really depends on the whole sentence...

"I agree and I have another point" -> I think this isn't the GMAT language, because I always noticed that "Agree" comes with some kind of preposition

so in GMAT land the sentence would sound
"I agree WITH you and I have another point"

Now look at this one:
"I agree TO watch this movie and have a popcorn at home"
What is wrong with it? The second TO is implied here (Subjuntive rule, which you should learn) and the meaning becomes "i agree to watch and I agree to have popcorn"... which is nonsense, because you don't agree to have popcorn... you "have" popcorn at home...

however, you might "agree to" do something...
"I agree to watch this movie."

Make sense?

Other SC gurus might be better than me, I am ESL as well :wink:
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2006, 07:26
u2lover wrote:
The loggers’ railway roadbed, [with its narrow spurs jutting fingerlike into the swamp,] had turned [into a hazard for tourists visiting the area] requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

[...] eliminate all the prepositional phrases and you are left with

The loggers’ railway roadbed had turned requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

the roadbed had turned (WHOM/WHAT)... governement officials (TO DO WHAT) to agree blah-blah...


A and B "had turned that..." THAT doesn't work here
C. very awkward
D. agreeing to... unidiomatic "Agree to" or "Agree with" awkward
E. very clear

It is E...


I cannot still understand why A is incorrect (not good at english either :cry: )
A's simplified structure will be "Roadbed had turned requiring that ~", and it looks ok to me.
Is there any subtle diffrence between meaning of "require ~ to do" and that of "require that ~ do" ?
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2006, 07:40
fireboll wrote:
u2lover wrote:
The loggers’ railway roadbed, [with its narrow spurs jutting fingerlike into the swamp,] had turned [into a hazard for tourists visiting the area] requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

[...] eliminate all the prepositional phrases and you are left with

The loggers’ railway roadbed had turned requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

the roadbed had turned (WHOM/WHAT)... governement officials (TO DO WHAT) to agree blah-blah...


A and B "had turned that..." THAT doesn't work here
C. very awkward
D. agreeing to... unidiomatic "Agree to" or "Agree with" awkward
E. very clear

It is E...


I cannot still understand why A is incorrect (not good at english either :cry: )
A's simplified structure will be "Roadbed had turned requiring that ~", and it looks ok to me.
Is there any subtle diffrence between meaning of "require ~ to do" and that of "require that ~ do" ?


I think we need an object (government officials) after "had turned" (Blah HAD TURNED (whom/what))... it didn't turn "requiring", but the officials themselves... "THAT" introduces us to a CLAUSE rather than object and using "requiring" incorrectly

does this make sense?
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2006, 07:54
u2lover wrote:
fireboll wrote:
u2lover wrote:
The loggers’ railway roadbed, [with its narrow spurs jutting fingerlike into the swamp,] had turned [into a hazard for tourists visiting the area] requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

[...] eliminate all the prepositional phrases and you are left with

The loggers’ railway roadbed had turned requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

the roadbed had turned (WHOM/WHAT)... governement officials (TO DO WHAT) to agree blah-blah...


A and B "had turned that..." THAT doesn't work here
C. very awkward
D. agreeing to... unidiomatic "Agree to" or "Agree with" awkward
E. very clear

It is E...


I cannot still understand why A is incorrect (not good at english either :cry: )
A's simplified structure will be "Roadbed had turned requiring that ~", and it looks ok to me.
Is there any subtle diffrence between meaning of "require ~ to do" and that of "require that ~ do" ?


I think we need an object (government officials) after "had turned" (Blah HAD TURNED (whom/what))... it didn't turn "requiring", but the officials themselves... "THAT" introduces us to a CLAUSE rather than object and using "requiring" incorrectly

does this make sense?


It had turned into a hazard for tourists visiting the area.
"turned into a hazard" can be a complete segment. isn't it?
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2006, 08:10
fireboll wrote:
It had turned into a hazard for tourists visiting the area.
"turned into a hazard" can be a complete segment. isn't it?


so your version sounds like this?

The loggers’ railway roadbed, [with its narrow spurs jutting fingerlike into the swamp,] had turned into a hazard [for tourists visiting the area] requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

awesome... it got to the bottom of this... and there is an idiom in MGMAT SC "requiring X to Y", which makes sense now... my mistake... :cry: I eliminated the essential prepositional phrase that was a subject of another clause... that's what I struggle with sometimes... when you have to read it fast, you pay less attention to the meaning... it is hazard that requires governement to agree, not the roadbeds...

good catch... OA should be A indeed :wink:
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2006, 08:26
u2lover wrote:
fireboll wrote:
It had turned into a hazard for tourists visiting the area.
"turned into a hazard" can be a complete segment. isn't it?


so your version sounds like this?

The loggers’ railway roadbed, [with its narrow spurs jutting fingerlike into the swamp,] had turned into a hazard [for tourists visiting the area] requiring that government officials agree to have the area razed.

awesome... it got to the bottom of this... and there is an idiom in MGMAT SC "requiring X to Y", which makes sense now... my mistake... :cry: I eliminated the essential prepositional phrase that was a subject of another clause... that's what I struggle with sometimes... when you have to read it fast, you pay less attention to the meaning... it is hazard that requires governement to agree, not the roadbeds...

good catch... OA should be A indeed :wink:


Actually, I didn't catch it. You did.

I didn't think that hazard is the subject of the verb, require.
But, after reading your posting, I came to feel it's right.
If the subject of "require" should be "roadbed", a comma would be required before "requiring".

Thanks !


But still not clear.
To me, both of A and E look OK.
:cry:

Is it only me who are still confused?
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2006, 08:34
fireboll,

so now... rely on the actual meaning of the sentence to eliminate E

roadbeds are NOT requiring government.... it is the hazard that is present on the roadbeds requires officials to agree... meaning the government would have the reason to raise those without a hazard present..
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 [#permalink] New post 02 Jul 2006, 06:17
requiring somebody to do something~ is idiomatic

(E)
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Jul 2006, 23:30
U2lover you are becoming a SC Guru! :wink:

BTW, 'E' is the answer.
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Re: SC: Logger's railway [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2006, 06:06
indasun wrote:
E.

require x to by y.


I'm confused too. Require that X be Y is also a correct idiom....
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2006, 07:17
M8 wrote:
U2lover you are becoming a SC Guru! :wink:

BTW, 'E' is the answer.


if E is the answer I am kind of far from guru, but :thanks anyway...

zoom can you post OA? I had enough nightmares about this question :lol:
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2006, 09:51
OA is E.
OE is The best answer is E. In English, the idiom is requiring x to y or requiring that x y with x as the noun subject and y the unconjugated form of the verb. Choice E follows the first paradigm.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2006, 12:06
damn, I already thought I was a guru :twisted:

this just tells you to go with your 1st choice... don't overthink... ha-ha :wink:
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Jul 2006, 20:07
SC gurus,please enlighten us......
:)
If possible, with examples to support both the idioms mentioned below.

In English, the idiom is requiring x to y or requiring that x y with x as the noun subject and y the unconjugated form of the verb. Choice E follows the first paradigm.
  [#permalink] 06 Jul 2006, 20:07
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