Find all School-related info fast with the new School-Specific MBA Forum

It is currently 21 Aug 2014, 20:20

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

The magnetic field of Jupiter is approximately twenty to

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 05 Jul 2011
Posts: 68
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 14

The magnetic field of Jupiter is approximately twenty to [#permalink] New post 21 Jul 2011, 00:09
The magnetic field of Jupiter is approximately twenty to thirty times stronger than that of Earth. Because of its strength and great distance from the sun, Jupiter has a magnetosphere that is considerably larger than the magnetosphere of Earth. If we could see the Jovian magnetosphere from Earth, it would appear close to the size of the moon in the sky, despite our great distance from Jupiter.
Jupiter's magnetosphere has three distinct regions. The inner region is doughnut-shaped, with the planet in the hole of the doughnut. This region is similar to Earth's inner magnetosphere, but more intense; containing several shells, where protons and electrons of enormous energies concentrate, as they do in Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. Jupiter's small innermost satellite, Amalthea, and three of its large satellites Io, Europa, and Ganymede travel through this inner region.
The middle region of Jupiter's magnetosphere has no Earthly counterpart. The middle Jovian region consists of a sheath of electrically charged particles being whirled around rapidly by the rotation of Jupiter's magnetic field. These particles strongly distort the intrinsic magnetic field of Jupiter.
The outer region is similar to the outer magnetosphere of Earth in that its shape is affected by the solar wind, a blizzard of electrons and protons that blows across space from the sun. The solar wind often forces the magnetic field of Jupiter back toward the planet, squeezing the magnetosphere as though it were a great air-filled bag. Leaks develop, from which high-energy particles 'squirt' across the solar system. Some of these particles have been detected in the atmospheres of Earth and Mercury by orbiting and interplanetary spacecraft.
The energized particles in the Jovian magnetosphere appear to have several sources. Some originate in the planet's ionosphere; others appear to be injected into the magnetosphere from the surface of the satellites. Io, in particular, is believed to interact with the Jovian magnetic field to produce energetic electrons, while volcanic activity on Io and the bombardment of Io's surface with energetic particles are believed to be responsible for releasing sodium, potassium, and sulfur ions into the magnetosphere. These atoms and ions form neutral clouds around Io and a doughnut-shaped torus of ions circling Jupiter in the plane of the magnetic equator.
Investigations of this complex toric region of plasma, where gas is fully ionized, are important in understanding not only the magnetosphere of Earth but other plasmas in general. Since most of the intensely energetic processes of the universe take place in plasmas, their study is important to future energy research, particularly in fusion power. The dynamic magnetosphere of Jupiter provides us with a unique laboratory for the study of these and other issues of astrophysics.



Which of the following titles best describes the content of the passage?

A) A Comparison of the Magnetospheres of Jupiter and Earth

B) The Three Regions of Jupiter's Magnetosphere

C) The Jovian Magnetosphere

D) The Magnetic Field of Jupiter

E) Jupiter: The Dynamic Planet


Its pretty confusing and difficult to judge for me. Please suggest some strategy for such question.
_________________

---Winners do it differently---

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 12 Mar 2010
Posts: 384
Concentration: Marketing, Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 680 Q49 V34
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 17 [0], given: 87

CAT Tests
Re: how to approach general question on tough RCs [#permalink] New post 21 Jul 2011, 09:52
IMO - C
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 05 Jul 2011
Posts: 68
Followers: 1

Kudos [?]: 18 [0], given: 14

Re: how to approach general question on tough RCs [#permalink] New post 21 Jul 2011, 18:41
'Why' is the question :P
_________________

---Winners do it differently---

Re: how to approach general question on tough RCs   [#permalink] 21 Jul 2011, 18:41
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
Magnetic fields jho1 11 26 May 2007, 16:40
Researchers have announced that the magnetic fields emitted ttanvir 3 11 Dec 2006, 13:29
Researchers have announced that the magnetic fields emitted jerrywu 9 18 Oct 2006, 06:32
Researchers have announced that the magnetic fields emitted jerrywu 4 07 Sep 2006, 20:53
Researchers have announced that the magnetic fields emitted jzchina 0 12 May 2006, 19:48
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The magnetic field of Jupiter is approximately twenty to

  Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


cron

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Privacy Policy| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group and phpBB SEO

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.