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The National Security Act of 1947 created a national

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The National Security Act of 1947 created a national [#permalink] New post 10 Sep 2012, 07:41
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Complete passage is discussed at
the-national-security-act-of-1947-created-a-national-97632.html#p752162


The National Security Act of 1947 created a national military establishment headed by a single Secretary of Defense. The legislation had been a year-and-a-half in the making—beginning when President Truman first recommended that the armed services be reorganized into a single department. During that period the President’s concept of a unified armed service was torn apart and put back together several times, the final measure to emerge from Congress being a compromise. Most of the opposition to the bill came from the Navy and its numerous civilian spokesmen, including Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal. In support of unification (and a separate air force that was part of the unification package) were the Army air forces, the Army, and, most importantly, the President of the United States.

Passage of the bill did not bring an end to the bitter interservice disputes. Rather than unify, the act served only to federate the military services. It neither halted the rapid demobilization of the armed forces that followed World War II nor brought to the new national military establishment the loyalties of officers steeped in the traditions of the separate services. At a time when the balance of power in Europe and Asia was rapidly shifting, the services lacked any precise statement of United States foreign policy from the National Security Council on which to base future programs. The services bickered unceasingly over their respective roles and missions, already complicated by the Soviet nuclear capability that for the first time made the United States subject to devastating attack. Not even the appointment of Forrestal as First Secretary of Defense allayed the suspicions of naval officers and their supporters that the role of the U.S. Navy was threatened with permanent eclipse. Before the war of words died down, Forrestal himself was driven to resignation and then suicide.

By 1948, the United States military establishment was forced to make do with a budget approximately 10 percent of what it had been at its wartime peak. Meanwhile, the cost of weapons procurement was rising geometrically as the nation came to put more and more reliance on the atomic bomb and its delivery systems. These two factors inevitably made adversaries of the Navy and the Air Force as the battle between advocates of the B-36 and the supercarrier so amply demonstrates. Given severe fiscal restraints on the one hand, and on the other the nation’s increasing reliance on strategic nuclear deterrence, the conflict between these two services over roles and missions was essentially a contest over slices of an ever-diminishing pie.

Yet if in the end neither service was the obvious victor, the principle of civilian dominance over the military clearly was. If there had ever been any danger that the United States military establishment might exploit, to the detriment of civilian control, the goodwill it enjoyed as a result of its victories in World War II, that danger disappeared in the interservice animosities engendered by the battle over unification.

1. Which of the following best describes the tone of the selection?
(A) Analytical and confident
(B) Resentful and defensive
(C) Objective and speculative
(D) Tentative and skeptical
(E) Persuasive and cynical

2. It can be inferred from the passage that Forrestal’s appointment as Secretary of Defense was expected to
(A) placate members of the Navy
(B) result in decreased levels of defense spending
(C) outrage advocates of the Army air forces
(D) win Congressional approval of the unification plan
(E) make Forrestal a Presidential candidate against Truman

3. With which of the following statements about defense unification would the author most likely agree?
(A) Although the unification was not entirely successful, it had the unexpected result of ensuring civilian control of the military.
(B) The unification legislation was necessitated by the drastic decline in appropriations for the military services.
(C) Unification ultimately undermined United States military capability by inciting interservice rivalry.
(D) In spite of the attempted unification, each service was still able to pursue its own objectives without interference from the other branches.
(E) Unification was in the first place unwarranted and in the second place ineffective.


Source: Cambridge Ed TestPrep Plus
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Re: The National Security Act of 1947 [#permalink] New post 10 Sep 2012, 12:05
What r the answers D,A,A?
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Re: The National Security Act of 1947 created a national [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2012, 22:08
MY answer is
E
A
B
PLs post the OA and OE
it was a tough passage time consume
i took 9 min
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Re: The National Security Act of 1947 created a national [#permalink] New post 02 Oct 2012, 22:22
Can some one explain how to comment on tone of the passage
i mean what is a pursuasive tone and other tone
i know the meaning but how to identify
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Re: The National Security Act of 1947 created a national [#permalink] New post 03 Oct 2012, 09:56
Archit143 wrote:
Can some one explain how to comment on tone of the passage
i mean what is a pursuasive tone and other tone
i know the meaning but how to identify



OA is A,A,A
my $0.02 : The passage is structured as a narrative of a historical event and circumstances surrounding it. I don't think there is a lot in terms of the authors personal opinion. That straightaway takes out cynical, skeptical and defensive (and persuasive, as he is not trying to forward any argument or point of view over another). I agree that the author is objective, but I don't see any speculations.

The author does seem to give us an opinion in the last para, but I would categorize that under final analysis rather than persuasion.

Alternative explanations are welcome :)
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Re: The National Security Act of 1947 created a national [#permalink] New post 03 Oct 2012, 16:15
Q1) Well I thought of going with persuasive considering the last para but there is nothing in the passage which makes the tone cynical. So E goes out. Hence (A). Explanation for the remaining options given by Legendaddy. :D
Q2) Check out the last 3 lines of the second para wherein it is clearly mentioned that the appointment was expected to diminish the suspicions of the naval officers. This is well established by the option (A).
Q3) Since neither service was victor so it can be inferred that unification was not entirely successful. Plus the first line of the last para indicates the civilian control of the military. Hence (A).
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Re: The National Security Act of 1947 created a national   [#permalink] 03 Oct 2012, 16:15
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