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The number of applications for teaching positions in Newtown

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Re: CR-Teaching positions [#permalink] New post 19 Nov 2008, 21:56
it should be E.
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Re: CR-Teaching positions [#permalink] New post 19 Nov 2008, 22:22
agree with icandy

the % data given in the stimulus is only to misguide. The % of applicants has decreased every year. What if every year positions open are way less than the number of applicants. E provides us with that data and solves the puzzle for us.

IMO E
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Re: CR-Teaching positions [#permalink] New post 20 Nov 2008, 06:48
Darnit. I went with C. but I have no OA for this either. I candy - can you explain a little bit more why C is wrong?
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Re: CR-Teaching positions [#permalink] New post 20 Nov 2008, 07:53
thanks +1
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Re: CR-Teaching positions [#permalink] New post 19 Dec 2008, 11:10
I fell for C. But thanks guys for all the explanations...now I understood why E makes sense.
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support to explanation [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2009, 00:46
The number of applications for teaching positions in Newtown’s public schools was 5.7
percent lower in 1993 than in 1985 and 5.9 percent lower in 1994 than in 1985. Despite a
steadily growing student population and an increasing number of teacher resignations,
however, Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s.
Which of the following, if true, would contribute most to an explanation of the apparent
discrepancy above?
A. Many of Newtown’s public school students do not graduate from high school.
B. New housing developments planned for Newtown are slated for occupancy in
1997 and are expected to increase the number of elementary school students in
Newtown’s public schools by 12 percent.
C. The Newtown school board does not contemplate increasing the ratio of students
to teachers in the 1990’s.
D. Teachers’ colleges in and near Newtown produced fewer graduates in 1994 than
in 1993.
E. In 1993 Newtown’s public schools received 40 percent more applications for
teaching positions than there were positions available.
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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 27 Apr 2009, 05:57
Ans E.

Clearly though the No of application is lower than that of 1985, the no of application is 40 % mor than the no of vacancies in 1993. This clearly show Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s.
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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2009, 18:20
I also chose E as the best answer, however I think the question is poorly constructed.
I don't think E perfectly fits as an explanation, because the described situation with applications is not certain to take place in the late 90s.

Would still choose E at the exam.
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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 29 Apr 2009, 19:28
E

decrease in applications, but still too many applicants. no shortage of teachers
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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 05 May 2009, 08:43
vageesh wrote:
The number of applications for teaching positions in Newtown’s public schools was 5.7
percent lower in 1993 than in 1985 and 5.9 percent lower in 1994 than in 1985. Despite a
steadily growing student population and an increasing number of teacher resignations,
however, Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s.
Which of the following, if true, would contribute most to an explanation of the apparent
discrepancy above?
A. Many of Newtown’s public school students do not graduate from high school.
B. New housing developments planned for Newtown are slated for occupancy in
1997 and are expected to increase the number of elementary school students in
Newtown’s public schools by 12 percent.
C. The Newtown school board does not contemplate increasing the ratio of students
to teachers in the 1990’s.
D. Teachers’ colleges in and near Newtown produced fewer graduates in 1994 than
in 1993.
E. In 1993 Newtown’s public schools received 40 percent more applications for
teaching positions than there were positions available.


I'll go with C

If the school doesn't care about the 'teacher student' ratio then no number of resignations or increase in the number of students will cause shortage of staff

I don't think E explains the discrepancy - the argument says that there was no shortage of teachers in the late 1990s, where as E talks specifically about the year 1993.

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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 29 Jul 2009, 07:29
what is the problem with C here?

please explain
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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 29 Jul 2009, 08:49
I will go with E
True that it talks about 1993 only. But this is the only option which, to some extent, reconcile contradictory statement.
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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 29 Jul 2009, 09:20
E for me.

In C, option talks about the students per teacher. But if there are too many prospective students in the community and there are very few teachers, doesn't it still implies that the school is admitting few students because of the shortage of the teachers.
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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 31 Jul 2009, 08:07
This is confusing question. OA and source please?
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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 03 Aug 2009, 11:17
I think it's C
for eg. lets say the student population in 1985 be 1000 with 100 teachers. so the ratio of students to teachers is 10:1
lets say the number of applications be 100 in 1985.
now in 1994 the no. of application are 94. lets say the student population soared to 1500. to maintain the same student:teacher ratio, the count of teachers has to increase by 50.
so out of 94 teaching applications 50 have to be selected which is still fine and situation doesnt seem out of control.

Alternate explanations will be welcome :)
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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 03 Aug 2009, 11:24
IMO C
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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 03 Aug 2009, 19:32
IMO C.

Shortage of teachers is relative, hence C can be used to explain.
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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 03 Aug 2009, 20:09
Tricky one.

I think the % in the problem are given to mislead the exam taker :)

Despite a steadily growing student population and an increasing number of teacher resignations,
however, Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s.

Given the above sentences in bold, i think the school is not keen on increasing the no of teachers with respect to Students

So ans C

E - This is the way i would negate it.
What if Newtown’s public schools received 60 percent , would it be any different
What if Newtown’s public schools received less than 40% in the following years to 1993

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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 04 Aug 2009, 07:49
IMO C.

C. The Newtown school board does not contemplate increasing the ratio of students
to teachers in the 1990’s.


Despite the steadily growing student body and growing number of resignation from teachers, if the school doesn't care about the student/teacher ratio - i.e. more # of students being taught by less # of teachers, then the shortage can be reconcilled.
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Re: support to explanation [#permalink] New post 04 Aug 2009, 08:20
I go for E
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Re: support to explanation   [#permalink] 04 Aug 2009, 08:20
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