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The number of applications for teaching positions in Newtown

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The number of applications for teaching positions in Newtown [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2005, 15:47
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48% (01:49) correct 52% (01:54) wrong based on 28 sessions
The number of applications for teaching positions in Newtown’s public schools was 5.7 percent lower in 1993 than in 1985 and 5.9 percent lower in 1994 than in 1985. despite a steadily growing student population and an increasing number of teacher resignations, however, Newtown does not face a shortage in the late 1990’s.

Which of the following, if true, would contribute most to an explanation of the apparent discrepancy above?

(A) Many of Newtown’s public school students do not graduate from high school.
(B) New housing developments planned for Newtown are (shared) for occupancy in 1987 and are expected to increase the number of elementary school students in Newtown’s public
(C) The Newtown school board does not contemplate increasing the ratio of students to teachers in the 1990’s.
(D) Teachers’ colleges in and near Newtown produced lower graduates in 1994 than in 1993.
(E) In 1993 Newtown’s public schools received 40 percent more applications for teaching positions than there were positions available.
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2005, 17:15
E for this.
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 [#permalink] New post 14 Jul 2005, 17:54
E looks good
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 [#permalink] New post 15 Jul 2005, 10:58
E for me too. The answer should be a choice, which should convey a sense that there are sufficient teachers. The argument states that the number of teaching applicants are going down. Only E states that there were more applicants than positions. Therefore there are no teaching shortages.
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CR: Newtown's public schools [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2005, 21:00
The number of applications for teaching positions in Newtown’s public schools was 5.7 percent lower in 1993 than in 1985 and 5.9 percent lower in 1994 than in 1985. Despite a steadily growing student population and an increasing number of teacher resignations, however, Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s.

Which of the following, if true, would contribute most to an explanation of the apparent discrepancy above?

A. Many of Newtown’s public school students do not graduate from high school.
B. New housing developments planned for Newtown are slated for occupancy in 1997 and are expected to increase the number of elementary school students in Newtown’s public schools by 12 percent.
C. The Newtown school board does not contemplate increasing the ratio of students to teachers in the 1990’s.
D. Teachers’ colleges in and near Newtown produced fewer graduates in 1994 than in 1993.
E. In 1993 Newtown’s public schools received 40 percent more applications for teaching positions than there were positions available.

I go with D....
Need your wisdom :]
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2005, 22:25
I think it is 'E'.

It can't be 'D', the stem says, "...however, Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s", 'D' talks only about the past but nothing about the future (late 1990's).
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Nov 2005, 23:16
I vote for (E).

The article says that there are more students than teachers.
However, (E) says that the school already had surplus of teachers.
Therefore, until this surplus is exhausted, there will be no lack of teachers.
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CR-Teaching positions [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2007, 05:52
Guys,

Could you try the problem below? Please explain your answer.

S15-Q8. The number of applications for teaching positions in Newtown’s public schools was 5.7 percent lower in 1993 than in 1985 and 5.9 percent lower in 1994 than in 1985. Despite a steadily growing student population and an increasing number of teacher resignations, however, Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s.

Which of the following, if true, would contribute most to an explanation of the apparent discrepancy above?

A. Many of Newtown’s public school students do not graduate from high school.
B. New housing developments planned for Newtown are slated for occupancy in 1997 and are expected to increase the number of elementary school students in Newtown’s public schools by 12 percent.
C. The Newtown school board does not contemplate increasing the ratio of students to teachers in the 1990’s.
D. Teachers’ colleges in and near Newtown produced fewer graduates in 1994 than in 1993.
E. In 1993 Newtown’s public schools received 40 percent more applications for teaching positions than there were positions available.
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2007, 07:41
E says that in 1993 Newtown’s public schools received 40 percent more applications.....so in 1984 it would have been more than that...and it 1994 the decrease is not much from 1993 fig's as relative decrease of 5.9 and 5.7 is given.

So as the application for the post of teaches is always more than the posts available thus Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s.
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Re: CR-Teaching positions [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2007, 09:46
dvtohir wrote:
Guys,

Could you try the problem below? Please explain your answer.

S15-Q8. The number of applications for teaching positions in Newtown’s public schools was 5.7 percent lower in 1993 than in 1985 and 5.9 percent lower in 1994 than in 1985. Despite a steadily growing student population and an increasing number of teacher resignations, however, Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s.

Which of the following, if true, would contribute most to an explanation of the apparent discrepancy above?

A. Many of Newtown’s public school students do not graduate from high school.
Well i dont think this is absoulety a correct choice but i think this choice partially explains that if not many students graduate form newtown's school then even if the number of incomming students is increasing there is no need to recrute more teaching staff
B. New housing developments planned for Newtown are slated for occupancy in 1997 and are expected to increase the number of elementary school students in Newtown’s public schools by 12 percent.
This statement talks about increasing the number of students and does not say a thing about teachers. So eliminate this choice

C. The Newtown school board does not contemplate increasing the ratio of students to teachers in the 1990’s.
This is irrelavent. So eliminate
D. Teachers’ colleges in and near Newtown produced fewer graduates in 1994 than in 1993.
This statement is clearly out of scope. So eliminate this choice as well
E. In 1993 Newtown’s public schools received 40 percent more applications for teaching positions than there were positions available.

This statement says that the teachers' applications were good enough for early 90's But we cannot say that the same would be true for late 90's . So this also cannot be the correct answere choice.

If someone has a better explanation, which i am sure someone would, then explain the answere choice to this question.
Javed.

Cheers!
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2007, 12:41
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apache wrote:
E says that in 1993 Newtown’s public schools received 40 percent more applications.....so in 1984 it would have been more than that...and it 1994 the decrease is not much from 1993 fig's as relative decrease of 5.9 and 5.7 is given.

So as the application for the post of teaches is always more than the posts available thus Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s.


Picked E for the same reasons.
Let the numof teachers in 1985 be 100.
In 1993, if 5 teachers resigned , 7 applicants would have applied for the job. The number of applicants in 1993 is 5.7 % less than the number of applicants in 1985. The number of students have increased, number of resignation has increased , but the shortage can be filled because the nos of applicants is greater than the nos of posts available.
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2007, 20:49
goalsnr wrote:
apache wrote:
E says that in 1993 Newtown’s public schools received 40 percent more applications.....so in 1984 it would have been more than that...and it 1994 the decrease is not much from 1993 fig's as relative decrease of 5.9 and 5.7 is given.

So as the application for the post of teaches is always more than the posts available thus Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s.


Picked E for the same reasons.
Let the numof teachers in 1985 be 100.
In 1993, if 5 teachers resigned , 7 applicants would have applied for the job. The number of applicants in 1993 is 5.7 % less than the number of applicants in 1985. The number of students have increased, number of resignation has increased , but the shortage can be filled because the nos of applicants is greater than the nos of posts available.


Well your explanation is good enough to make me understand that the newtown school did not face the shortage of teachers in the early 90's but the question is why newtown shcool did not face shortage of teaching staff in late 90's. So i dont know if i am misssing something but to me E cannot be an answere. Can anybody explain me why E is the answere..>
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2007, 20:49
goalsnr wrote:
apache wrote:
E says that in 1993 Newtown’s public schools received 40 percent more applications.....so in 1984 it would have been more than that...and it 1994 the decrease is not much from 1993 fig's as relative decrease of 5.9 and 5.7 is given.

So as the application for the post of teaches is always more than the posts available thus Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s.


Picked E for the same reasons.
Let the numof teachers in 1985 be 100.
In 1993, if 5 teachers resigned , 7 applicants would have applied for the job. The number of applicants in 1993 is 5.7 % less than the number of applicants in 1985. The number of students have increased, number of resignation has increased , but the shortage can be filled because the nos of applicants is greater than the nos of posts available.


Well your explanation is good enough to make me understand that the newtown school did not face the shortage of teachers in the early 90's but the question is why newtown shcool did not face shortage of teaching staff in late 90's. So i dont know if i am misssing something but to me E cannot be an answere. Can anybody explain me why E is the answere..>
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2007, 20:50
goalsnr wrote:
apache wrote:
E says that in 1993 Newtown’s public schools received 40 percent more applications.....so in 1984 it would have been more than that...and it 1994 the decrease is not much from 1993 fig's as relative decrease of 5.9 and 5.7 is given.

So as the application for the post of teaches is always more than the posts available thus Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s.


Picked E for the same reasons.
Let the numof teachers in 1985 be 100.
In 1993, if 5 teachers resigned , 7 applicants would have applied for the job. The number of applicants in 1993 is 5.7 % less than the number of applicants in 1985. The number of students have increased, number of resignation has increased , but the shortage can be filled because the nos of applicants is greater than the nos of posts available.
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Apr 2007, 20:52
goalsnr wrote:
apache wrote:
E says that in 1993 Newtown’s public schools received 40 percent more applications.....so in 1984 it would have been more than that...and it 1994 the decrease is not much from 1993 fig's as relative decrease of 5.9 and 5.7 is given.


So as the application for the post of teaches is always more than the posts available thus Newtown dose not face a teacher shortage in the late 1990’s.


Picked E for the same reasons.
Let the numof teachers in 1985 be 100.
In 1993, if 5 teachers resigned , 7 applicants would have applied for the job. The number of applicants in 1993 is 5.7 % less than the number of applicants in 1985. The number of students have increased, number of resignation has increased , but the shortage can be filled because the nos of applicants is greater than the nos of posts available.


Well your explanation is good enough to make me understand that the newtown school did not face the shortage of teachers in the early 90's but the question is why newtown shcool did not face shortage of teaching staff in late 90's. So i dont know if i am misssing something but to me E cannot be an answere. Can anybody explain me why E is the answere..>
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 [#permalink] New post 01 May 2007, 09:12
Thanks all of you for the explanations.

IMO (not official answer) is E.
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 [#permalink] New post 01 May 2007, 21:28
One year's statistics can't explain the lack of teachers shortage for entire 90s .. the scope of this CR is pretty wide open.... I can only guess ...
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Re: CR-Teaching positions [#permalink] New post 19 Nov 2008, 16:33
This is a good question. Anyone have the answer for this? Or opinions?
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Re: CR-Teaching positions [#permalink] New post 19 Nov 2008, 16:57
bigfernhead wrote:
This is a good question. Anyone have the answer for this? Or opinions?



I dont know the OA but I picked E. Here is my thought

What is teacher shortage? If there are 100 positions available and there are less than 100 teachers available. In other words there are positions that can be filled but cannot be because no one qualified is available or for what ever reasons.

Classic percentage problem in stimulus. compares 93 and 94 with 85. How ever E says that the number of applications is 40% more than the number of positions. So there is a possibility that atleast as many applicants as positions are qualified enough and NT does not face a shortage.

IMO, C is a trap on S/T or T/S ratio.

A and B were out of scope. D does not explain discrepancy of why fewer graduates will NOT lead to shortage
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Re: CR-Teaching positions [#permalink] New post 19 Nov 2008, 21:56
it should be E.
Re: CR-Teaching positions   [#permalink] 19 Nov 2008, 21:56
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