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The paintings of Geoirges de la Tour reflect an almost

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The paintings of Geoirges de la Tour reflect an almost [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2004, 09:04
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The paintings of Geoirges de la Tour reflect an almost sensous fascination with the properties of light,much like Vermeer.

A
B much as Vermeer
C much as Vermeer did
D much like Vermeer's did
E much as Vermeer's do
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2004, 09:21
D for me. We have to make sure the possessive form is present in order to compare the painting of Georges to those of Vermeer. The " 's " is needed for that purpose and A, B, C are immediately out. Now, is it "much like" or "much as"? I believe when comparing two same objects, "much like" better conveys the comparison. I may be wrong though :stupid
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2004, 09:24
Paul wrote:
D for me. We have to make sure the possessive form is present in order to compare the painting of Georges to those of Vermeer. The " 's " is needed for that purpose and A, B, C are immediately out. Now, is it "much like" or "much as"? I believe when comparing two same objects, "much like" better conveys the comparison. I may be wrong though :stupid


Paul, D also contains 'did' which, I think, is not consistent with 'reflect'. Both has to be in the same tense.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2004, 10:03
The answer is E

Vermeer's action must be in the present tense, like the original ("reflect").

We are comparing actions and not people so B is ruled out

"much as" sounds akward to me, but it's better than the past tense I guess.. :?
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2004, 10:04
Yes, I did not like the "did" too much either. Anyone can then clarify the subtlety between much as and much like?
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2004, 10:13
Paul, I think maybe the "much as" vs. "much like" is a red herring designed to confuse and distract from the real issue.

The "did" makes the entire action in the past saying his painting do not reflect anymore. "Do" continues the action as if his painting still exist and are continuing to reflect.

I wouldn't stress over this as v like comparison. Just know that you can find the proper answer.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2004, 10:50
Oh boy, I thought it was D at first. Then I looked up this reference, I think it is E now...

Eyal, thanks for posting this... I thought I understood this concept.

The "did" versus "do" bugged me as well, but I figured that the problem was testing "like" verus "as"... so I kinda ignored it.

I think you all might be interested in the rule (I found it on the web)...

Like versus As:

Like and as have these principal distinctions:

LikeтАФused as a prepositionтАФis followed by a noun, a pronoun, a gerund (-ing form of the verb, used as a noun), or a noun clause. AsтАФused as a conjunctionтАФintroduces a subordinate clause (remember that a clause contains a verb).Hope this helps resolve the question... I think I'd go with D on that one...

I thought as was used more for things that are equivalent whereas like is used for things that are similar but not equal. The excerpt below states that you use as to introduce a subordinate clause (one that contains a verb). The "did" really bugs with me though...

Check out the following link:

http://www.longman.com/ae/azar/grammar_ ... /00034.htm

For more information on other rules, you might want to check out the main list of grammar concepts:
http://www.longman.com/ae/azar/grammar_ ... _index.htm

Last edited by jo1to6 on 12 Apr 2004, 12:09, edited 2 times in total.
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2004, 11:03
Wow, a very exhaustive list of "as" and "like". Thank you!
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2004, 11:41
E ofcourse.

D says the paintings of Vermeer did in the past and dont do anymore. This is not correct.

"reflect" is an action in present time and "as" should be used to compare actions.
"do" is in paralell with "reflect"
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 [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2004, 15:18
jo1to6 wrote:
Oh boy, I thought it was D at first. Then I looked up this reference, I think it is E now...

Eyal, thanks for posting this... I thought I understood this concept.

The "did" versus "do" bugged me as well, but I figured that the problem was testing "like" verus "as"... so I kinda ignored it.

I think you all might be interested in the rule (I found it on the web)...

Like versus As:

Like and as have these principal distinctions:

LikeтАФused as a prepositionтАФis followed by a noun, a pronoun, a gerund (-ing form of the verb, used as a noun), or a noun clause. AsтАФused as a conjunctionтАФintroduces a subordinate clause (remember that a clause contains a verb).Hope this helps resolve the question... I think I'd go with D on that one...

I thought as was used more for things that are equivalent whereas like is used for things that are similar but not equal. The excerpt below states that you use as to introduce a subordinate clause (one that contains a verb). The "did" really bugs with me though...


Here are some uses of like.

LikeтАФused here as a prepositionтАФshows similarity:

The climate in Havana is like the climate in Miami.

He works like a dog.

Do you remember Princess Diana? My sister looks just like her.

I love sailing on open water on a beautiful dayтАФit's like being in paradise.

Oh! You got lost? That's like what happened to me.

Like can be used to mention examples to mean "such as":

A lot of older people, like my grandparents, for example, are enjoying their retirement by traveling all over the world.

There are many things to do at the resort, like swimming, snorkeling, and sailing.

(It's possible to use like and such as (NOT as alone) interchangeably in the two sentences above; used in this way to introduce examples, like is somewhat less formal.)

Here are some uses of as.

AsтАФa subordinating conjunction hereтАФcan be used to show similarity in a subordinate clause:

Treat people as you want them to treat you.

Benny is an excellent long-distance runner, just as his father was.

As can be used to indicate that one event was happening at the same time as another:

The president arrived just as all the guest were leaving.

As the man got off the elevator, he was arrested by two policemen.

As тАж as is used in comparisons:

Benny runs as fast as his father did.

Benny runs as fast as his father. (You can use the noun only; the verb is understood).

Problem area: As can also be used as a preposition meaning equal to; it is different from like, which means similar, but not equal to. Look at these sentences:

(a)
Ferguson worked as a teacher in a rural area for twenty years.
(He was a teacher, or, he worked in the capacity of a teacher)

(b)
Mary's not a nurse, she's a nurse's assistant, but she works like a nurse, with almost the same responsibility, and doing the same things.

(c)
As the president, he called for peace between the warring nations.
(In the capacity of president, he called for peace)


(d)
Like the president, he called for peace between the warring nations.
(In a manner like the president's, another person called for peace)

(e)
Who used my knife as a screwdriver?
(My knife = a screwdriver)

(f)
A knife is like a screwdriver in some ways.
(A knife is similar to a screwdriver)

Which person would you prefer to see when you are sick: A person who works as a doctor, or a person who works like a doctor?

Confusing area: Like, informally, can be used as a conjunction, to introduce a subordinate clause, to mean as if or as though. Some strict grammarians, however, disapprove of using like in this way:

I felt like I had been run over by a truck.
She looked like she might faint.


i hope this is not copyrighted. will you let me know please?
  [#permalink] 08 Apr 2004, 15:18
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