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The proposal to extend clinical trials, which are routinely

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The proposal to extend clinical trials, which are routinely [#permalink] New post 05 Aug 2004, 00:05
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A
B
C
D
E

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The proposal to extend clinical trials, which are routinely used as systematic tests of pharmaceutical innovations, to new surgical procedures should not be implemented. The point is that surgical procedures differ in one important respect from medicinal drugs: a correctly prescribed drug depends for its effectiveness only on the drug's composition, whereas the effectiveness of even the most appropriate surgical procedure is transparently related to the skills of the surgeon who uses it.

The reasoning in the argument is flawed because the argument

(A) does not consider that new surgical procedures might be found to be intrinsically more harmful than the best treatment previously available
(B) ignores the possibility that the challenged proposal is deliberately crude in a way designed to elicit criticism to be used in relining the proposal
(C) assumes that a surgeon's skills remain unchanged throughout the surgeon's professional life
(D) describes a dissimilarity without citing any scientific evidence for the existence of that dissimilarity
(E) rejects a proposal presumably advanced in good faith without acknowledging any such good faith
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Aug 2004, 00:35
Well I will go for C.

"the effectiveness of even the most appropriate surgical procedure is transparently related to the skills of the surgeon who uses it"

My argument is that overtime the sugeon's skills will improve and so is the 'effectiveness' of the surgery.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Aug 2004, 03:00
A - adds more support to the conclusion (Oleg, am I missing anything here)
B - out of scope
C- under shortlist
D- shortlist
E- out of scope ('good faith' or no such intent is mentioned)

Between C and D. C it is.

C directly refers to an assumption on surgeons.

D refers to 'no scientific similarity' - the comparison given in the evidence is not bad enough.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Aug 2004, 03:58
Here is my analysis of this argument:

the argument says that extending clinical trials is unnecessary because surgical procedures are influenced by surgeons' mastery which is not affected by the length of the trial

However, the argument fails to show that there is no reason APART from surgeons' mastery that can influence the success of the procedure. (A) introduces such a reason by saying that "new surgical procedures might be found to be intrinsically harmful". If it is so, then no matter how skillful the surgeons are, the new procedures are flawed and therefore need to be put UNDER EXTENDED TRIALS

D) Do we really need a scientific evidence to see the difference between a DRUG and a SURGICAL PROCEDURE?

C) Well, even if surgeons' skills do change overtime, it does not reject the possibility that surgeons' skills ARE DETERMINANT for the success of the procedures while the trial time plays NO MAJOR ROLE
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Aug 2004, 04:28
:cool Oleg. A it must be
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Aug 2004, 09:29
Nice explanation Oleg
OA is A

How much time did it take u guys to solve this CR?
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Aug 2004, 17:11
~1 min and A.

there is no need for surgery when other better methods to cure are available. thus, surgeon is at fault and should be trailed.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Aug 2004, 04:21
Great analysis!!

Infact, I did not understand the question stem at all for atleast 1 min. Thus, I just guessed D and it was wrong. 8-) 8-)


OlegC wrote:
Here is my analysis of this argument:

the argument says that extending clinical trials is unnecessary because surgical procedures are influenced by surgeons' mastery which is not affected by the length of the trial

However, the argument fails to show that there is no reason APART from surgeons' mastery that can influence the success of the procedure. (A) introduces such a reason by saying that "new surgical procedures might be found to be intrinsically harmful". If it is so, then no matter how skillful the surgeons are, the new procedures are flawed and therefore need to be put UNDER EXTENDED TRIALS

D) Do we really need a scientific evidence to see the difference between a DRUG and a SURGICAL PROCEDURE?

C) Well, even if surgeons' skills do change overtime, it does not reject the possibility that surgeons' skills ARE DETERMINANT for the success of the procedures while the trial time plays NO MAJOR ROLE

_________________

Awaiting response,

Thnx & Rgds,
Chandra

  [#permalink] 06 Aug 2004, 04:21
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