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The proposal to hire ten new police officers in Middletown

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Director
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The proposal to hire ten new police officers in Middletown [#permalink] New post 23 Dec 2004, 07:12
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A
B
C
D
E

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The proposal to hire ten new police officers in Middletown is quite foolish. There is sufficient funding to pay the salaries of the new officers, but not the salaries of additional court and prison employees to process the increased caseload of arrests and convictions that new officers usually generate.
Which of the following, if true, will most seriously weaken the conclusion drawn above?
(A) Studies have shown that an increase in a city’s police force does not necessarily reduce crime.
(B) When one major city increased its police force by 19 percent last year, there were 40 percent more arrests and 13 percent more convictions.
(C) If funding for the new police officers’ salaries is approved, support for other city services will have to be reduced during the next fiscal year.
(D) In most United States cities, not all arrests result in convictions, and not all convictions result in prison terms.
(E) Middletown’s ratio of police officers to citizens has reached a level at which an increase in the number of officers will have a deterrent effect on crime.

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The passage says that hiring new officers usually brings new court expenses, but according to choice E hiring new officers in Middletown will lead to a reduction in crime and thus, perhaps, a reduction in court and prison expenses. Therefore, choice E weakens the conclusion drawn and is the best answer. Three of the other choices tend to support claims made in the passage; choice A suggests that arrests will increase, choice B says that in one city arrests did increase, choice C confirms the scarcity of funds. Choice D is irrelevant; it merely states the obvious about rates of arrest, conviction, and imprisonment.

I found (D) is more convincing than (E) as a matter of fact. In (E), if crime reduces b/c of more police, I think there should be more "arrests and court and prison" in order to reduce crimes. In (D), it breaks the connection between "more cops" and "more arrests & court & prison" so there should be no increase in cost. What do you think?
Manager
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Dec 2004, 09:42
Quote:
I found (D) is more convincing than (E) as a matter of fact. In (E), if crime reduces b/c of more police, I think there should be more "arrests and court and prison" in order to reduce crimes. In (D), it breaks the connection between "more cops" and "more arrests & court & prison" so there should be no increase in cost. What do you think?


No, the explanation to this question is correct. (D) merely states the obvious. There are fewer arrests than crimes and fewer convictions than arrests. (E) is clearly the right answer, you're missing that (E) tells us that more cops is a deterrant, which means less crime altogether. Not more arrests and court and prison. Less.
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 [#permalink] New post 23 Dec 2004, 10:48
OK, this question obviously show an assumption:
+ less crime -> less court & prison

I wonder if this can be "true"?
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 [#permalink] New post 24 Dec 2004, 21:20
I'm not exactly sure what your question is, but if crime is currently the source of arrests and court cases, then if crime decreases unless something else increases arrests and court cases, then you're going to have a decrease.
  [#permalink] 24 Dec 2004, 21:20
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