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The Quant Maze for the Ph.D student

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The Quant Maze for the Ph.D student [#permalink] New post 25 Jun 2005, 18:49
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I dont know if it helps to discuss Math concepts/ descriptions here.
Excellence in Math is one thing that would take you places in the publish or perish world of academia. If you have a question or want to contibute your math knowledge to the forum, please go ahead.

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Quantitative Skills [#permalink] New post 25 Nov 2005, 18:05
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Hi, Soulutions,

Knowledge of statistics is by far the most important quantitative skill for doctoral programs in business in general, but as Praetorian said, the specific quantitative subdisciplines that you should expect to master depend on your specific business discipline.

In general, do not think in terms of what quantitative skills predominate in a particular discipline's academic requirements. Rather, think in terms of what quantitative skills are generally the most difficult to master. Although statistics will figure prominently throughout your doctoral program and all of your empirical research, it is not one of the difficult quantitative skills. Instead, you may take a course or two in something very difficult, possibly never to see those algorithms ever again after the course is over. Here is a rough guideline, off the top of my head, of the one of the toughest subdisciplines of the quantitative arts that I can think of that you might see in each of several business disciplines:

1. Accounting. Stochastic differential equations.
2. Finance. Stochastic differential equations.
3. Human Resource Management. Differential calculus.
4. Management. Differential calculus.
5. Management Information Systems. Differential calculus.
6. Management Science. Differential calculus.
7. Managerial Economics. Differential calculus.
8. Marketing. Differential calculus.
9. Operations Management. Stochastic processes.

I certainly welcome further updates to this little table. Some people may disagree that what I've listed is both difficult and likely to crop up in each listed discipline.

Quantitative challenges that you should expect to see in all disciplines, somewhere along the way, include game theory, Pareto optimization, linear programming, and Bayesian analysis, in addition to statistics. These are not difficult subjects, however, so it might be worthwhile to build your confidence by tackling all of these up front, if you have the time. Then go on to the more interesting topics listed above.

Lastly, regarding statistics per se, plan on mastering everything up to multivariate analysis, including hierarchical regression analysis. Again, these are not difficult disciplines to master, but sometimes you can get bogged down in details and forget what you're doing. Possibly a good strategy to follow in mastering statistics is to work hard to figure out exactly why a formula is the way it is. Even the simplest principles should be scrutinized this way if you wish to master the more difficult ones. Once you have worked it that far, you are a lot less likely to get confused by the notation.
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 [#permalink] New post 29 Jun 2005, 07:10
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I will be entering a quantitative marketing program this fall and am spending the summer trying to brush up on my math skills. I will be attending a math camp offered through the econ department early in September but would still like to do a little more to make sure I am as prepared as possible when classes begin.

Can anyone recommend specific topics that a prospective Business PhD student should focus on? How mathematically rigorous should I expect the first year to be?

Thanks!
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 [#permalink] New post 28 Sep 2005, 04:14
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How much math is expected from Phd candidates in information technology?

I have a quandary, as I’ve never successfully passed a basic math course. I basically flunked out of high school – 1.31/4.00 GPA. I got into an undergraduate program by first going to a community college for two years and getting an associates degree.

I did fine in applied calculus, have an A in MBA Statistics, and a 3.6GPA in a quantitative focused Finance undergraduate degree. I understand the core mathematical theory’s just fine.

But at the same time, I couldn’t tell you the difference between a sine and cosine.

How much mathematic polish do I really need to get into a theory based program? My goal is a field called “Business Intelligence (the west-coast name), or Decision Support Systems (the east-coast name)â€
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 [#permalink] New post 09 Oct 2005, 05:44
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Not really. After your admit process is complete, there will be enough time to polish up. For now, I would suggest to focus on GMAT and the application process. Best Wishes !!
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Ph.D.-Information Technology [#permalink] New post 25 Nov 2005, 18:20
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Hi, Sedition,

Basically, statistics out the wazoo. You need to do research, after all. I assume that you've had a business research course that included all of the statistics coverage necessary to undertake survey research. It would have included all sorts of hypothesis-testing. If so, then just master that book. You'll be well on your way to succeeding at mastering the add-on statistics that will crop up later, including meta-analysis and structural-equation modeling.

No one cares about sines and cosines in business research. In business studies, as you have already figured out, it is not about mastering "math" per se, but rather statistics, or a curious amalgamation of statistics and calculus in the more quantitatively oriented disciplines. There are plenty of other maths out there that you can ignore and still succeed.

Sines and cosines are fun though. Look up the history. It's more fun than the application.
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Re: The Quant Maze for the Ph.D student [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2013, 08:24
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You needto score well in Quant. That's a must :D
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 [#permalink] New post 30 Jun 2005, 09:53
In some schools, the course structure is quite rigid. So you may want to check with your department and then go from there. I know Quant Marketing uses a lot of Game Theory and is also heavy on statistics. You should read the research paper attached in this forum. that may give you some insight.

Last edited by Praetorian on 11 Sep 2007, 19:25, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Quant Maze for the Ph.D student [#permalink] New post 25 Dec 2011, 21:09
Richard,

Is there any specific math/stat classes you would recommend for the PhD candidates in Accounting?
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Re: The Quant Maze for the Ph.D student [#permalink] New post 04 Dec 2013, 08:25
Verbal score would improve with time
Re: The Quant Maze for the Ph.D student   [#permalink] 04 Dec 2013, 08:25
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