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The recently negotiated North American Free Trade Agreement

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The recently negotiated North American Free Trade Agreement [#permalink] New post 22 Feb 2009, 23:28
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The recently negotiated North American Free Trade Agreement among Canada, Mexico, and the United States is misnamed, because it would not result in truly free trade. Adam Smith, the economist who first articulated the principles of free trade, held that any obstacle placed in the way of the free movement of goods, investment, or labor would defeat free trade. So since under the agreement workers would be restricted by national boundaries from seeking the best conditions they could find, the resulting obstruction of the flow of trade would, from a free-trade perspective, be harmful.

The argument proceeds by

(A) ruling out alternatives
(B) using a term in two different senses
(C) citing a nonrepresentative instance
(D) appealing to a relevant authority
(E) responding to a different issue from the one posed
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3 KUDOS received
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Re: CR: North American Free Trade [#permalink] New post 23 Feb 2009, 02:19
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Hi reply2spg,


Explanation:
--------------------
(A) ruling out alternatives ---> It's just opposing the Free Trade Agreement. No alternatives have been provided and hence, no ruling out of alternatives comes into picture.

(B) using a term in two different senses ---> IMO, no term has been used in two different senses; it's nonsense.

(C) citing a nonrepresentative instance ---> It's not a case of nonrepresentative instance; he's nowhere trying to distort data. He's only citing an expert opinion.

(D) appealing to a relevant authority ---> This is my choice but it's more based on process of elimination. As far as reasoning is concerned, we can say that the author is using an authority (here Adam Smith) to convince someone for something. So, we can say he's appealing to someone. In the first sentence (...it would not result in truly free trade) also, the excerpt hints that he's trying to state his stand (to someone).

(E) responding to a different issue from the one posed ---> He's not responding to any issue. He's trying to put forth his own stand. Also, no other issue has been posed.
--------------------

I found it tough. Anyways, as we have to select the best from the given choices, I'll go for option D.

Hope that helps.


Regards,
Technext
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Re: CR: North American Free Trade [#permalink] New post 23 Feb 2009, 02:57
reply2spg wrote:
The recently negotiated North American Free Trade Agreement among Canada, Mexico, and the United States is misnamed, because it would not result in truly free trade. Adam Smith, the economist who first articulated the principles of free trade, held that any obstacle placed in the way of the free movement of goods, investment, or labor would defeat free trade. So since under the agreement workers would be restricted by national boundaries from seeking the best conditions they could find, the resulting obstruction of the flow of trade would, from a free-trade perspective, be harmful.

The argument proceeds by

(A) ruling out alternatives
(B) using a term in two different senses
(C) citing a nonrepresentative instance
(D) appealing to a relevant authority
(E) responding to a different issue from the one posed


D is the best
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Re: CR: North American Free Trade [#permalink] New post 23 Feb 2009, 07:51
Agree with Technext

+1 for the wonderful explanation
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Re: CR: North American Free Trade [#permalink] New post 23 Feb 2009, 09:18
Technext, another +1 frm me.
U explained wonderfully.
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Re: CR: North American Free Trade [#permalink] New post 23 Feb 2009, 11:54
+1 to you.....yeah..no need to tell that OA is D
Technext wrote:
Hi reply2spg,


Explanation:
--------------------
(A) ruling out alternatives ---> It's just opposing the Free Trade Agreement. No alternatives have been provided and hence, no ruling out of alternatives comes into picture.

(B) using a term in two different senses ---> IMO, no term has been used in two different senses; it's nonsense.

(C) citing a nonrepresentative instance ---> It's not a case of nonrepresentative instance; he's nowhere trying to distort data. He's only citing an expert opinion.

(D) appealing to a relevant authority ---> This is my choice but it's more based on process of elimination. As far as reasoning is concerned, we can say that the author is using an authority (here Adam Smith) to convince someone for something. So, we can say he's appealing to someone. In the first sentence (...it would not result in truly free trade) also, the excerpt hints that he's trying to state his stand (to someone).

(E) responding to a different issue from the one posed ---> He's not responding to any issue. He's trying to put forth his own stand. Also, no other issue has been posed.
--------------------

I found it tough. Anyways, as we have to select the best from the given choices, I'll go for option D.

Hope that helps.


Regards,
Technext
Re: CR: North American Free Trade   [#permalink] 23 Feb 2009, 11:54
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