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The right kind of language skills

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The right kind of language skills [#permalink] New post 19 Sep 2013, 21:28
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The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, and will take lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people

1. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, and will take lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people

2. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but will take lot of resources for accomplishing the grade, an effort that will enervate and tire the people

3. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, besides taking lot of resources to accomplish the grade for enervating and tiring the people

4. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, which takes lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people

5. The right kind of language skills are those, which while giving us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but take lot of resources to accomplish the grade, to enervate and to tire the people
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: The right kind of language skills [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 01:10
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IMO Option 2.

The right kind of language skills
1. will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers
2. will take lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people

Two things will be best shown using contrast i.e. use of 'but'. Also,' 'will enervate and tire the people' ' describes and modifies the action in the second clause. Option 2 does it correctly.


1. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, and will take lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people. Incorrect placement of 'that',making it unclear rather ambigous.

2. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but will take lot of resources for accomplishing the grade, an effort that will enervate and tire the people.
Correct
'an effort that will enervate and tire the people' describes and modifies the clause before i. e. 'will take lot of resources for accomplishing the grade'

3. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, besides taking lot of resources to accomplish the grade for enervating and tiring the people. Incorrect . Use of 'Besides' in the second clause makes it difficult to understand the meaning . Seems like 'an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, besides taking lot of resources to accomplish the grade for enervating and tiring the people'

4. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, which takes lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people. Incorrect . Improper placement of 'Which' and no clear referent.

5. The right kind of language skills are those, which while giving us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but take lot of resources to accomplish the grade, to enervate and to tire the people.
Incorrect .
'which while giving us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but take lot of resources to accomplish the grade, to enervate and to tire the people.' Improper clause making it difficult to understand.
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Re: The right kind of language skills [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 01:19
I would chose B out of the alternatives, but I don't like any
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Re: The right kind of language skills [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 03:55
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daagh wrote:
The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, and will take lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people

1. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, and will take lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people

2. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but will take lot of resources for accomplishing the grade, an effort that will enervate and tire the people

3. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, besides taking lot of resources to accomplish the grade for enervating and tiring the people

4. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, which takes lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people
5. The right kind of language skills are those, which while giving us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but take lot of resources to accomplish the grade, to enervate and to tire the people


IMO C

Two Independent clauses separated by comma and coordinating conjunction(fanboys) should each have a subject and a verb.

A) In Original choice, The second independent clause will take lot of resources......... does not have subject and thus it becomes sentence fragment.

B) Here is also same mistake repeated with but

C) The Modifier 'besides taking........tiring the people' refers to The right kind of language skills. The sentence has only one independent clause.

D) which modifies the customers and thus implies that customers takes lot of resources.

E) Redundant and Incorrect use of but
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Re: The right kind of language skills [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 04:42
daagh wrote:
The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, and will take lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people

1. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, and will take lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people

2. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but will take lot of resources for accomplishing the grade, an effort that will enervate and tire the people

3. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, besides taking lot of resources to accomplish the grade for enervating and tiring the people

4. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, which takes lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people
5. The right kind of language skills are those, which while giving us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but take lot of resources to accomplish the grade, to enervate and to tire the people



I would go for B..

parallelism..will give..but will take...

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Re: The right kind of language skills [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 05:16
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Daagh, I must tell you that option A is really close. Nice work, keep it up and congrats for taking Verbal Expert position. Hope we all will learn a lot from you. Here is my view.

The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, and will take lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people

1. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, and will take lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people
Its not the "GRADE" that will tire people, but an "EFFORT to accomplish the grade" that will tire people. Moreover, the author wants to show some sort of contrast and AND doesn't fulfill that purpose. Thus Incorrect.

2. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but will take lot of resources for accomplishing the grade, an effort that will enervate and tire the people - Correct.

3. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, besides taking lot of resources to accomplish the grade for enervating and tiring the people -AND must be used before "An articulacy" to mark the end of the list. Moreover, the author wants to show some sort of contrast and BESIDES doesn't fulfill that purpose. Thus Incorrect.

4. The right kind of language skills will give us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, which takes lot of resources to accomplish the grade that will enervate and tire the people
WHICH can't stand for an action/verb in the previous clause. Thus this option is Incorrect.

5. The right kind of language skills are those, which while giving us the power, an eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but take lot of resources to accomplish the grade, to enervate and to tire the people - Pandora box, full of mistakes. So I will not discuss this option.
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Re: The right kind of language skills [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 06:06
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The topic hinges around a simple fact that when you conjugate two independent themes (ICs) you must join them with an appropriate conjunction. Therefore, to bring out the transition or contrast, one is required to use the conjunction but. Only choices B and E have the transitional fanboy ‘but;

Between B and E, the latter is a flagrant violator of SV number agreement, besides the conjunction ‘but’ coming in at an awkward place;
All other faults of parallelism are built in liberally in all other wrong choices deliberately.

Point on narenn: It is not that all compound sentences that are joined by fanboys must each have subject and verb. If the subject of the first clause can hold good for the second clause too, it is perfectly parallel to elide the subject in the second clause

Ex: Columbus ruthlessly marshaled his resources and discovered the new World. Here there is no need to repeat Columbus in the second clause. Similarly
The right kind of language skills will give us the power, eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but (the right kind of language skills) will take lot of resources.

Usage of the same subject or its pronoun is even considered redundant sometimes.
The choice is B

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Re: The right kind of language skills [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 06:20
Thanks for the Kudos :-). These kind of questions are really good, making me improve and learn more about meaning in SC rather than just grammar.

Expecting more such questions. Also love the SC questions posted by fameatop which are posted often on the SC forum.



daagh wrote:
The topic hinges around a simple fact that when you conjugate two independent themes (ICs) you must join them with an appropriate conjunction. Therefore, to bring out the transition or contrast, one is required to use the conjunction but. Only choices B and E have the transitional fanboy ‘but;

Between B and E, the latter is a flagrant violator of SV number agreement, besides the conjunction ‘but’ coming in at an awkward place;
All other faults of parallelism are built in liberally in all other wrong choices deliberately.

Point on narenn: It is not that all compound sentences that are joined by fanboys must each have subject and verb. If the subject of the first clause can hold good for the second clause too, it is perfectly parallel to elide the subject in the second clause

Ex: Columbus ruthlessly marshaled his resources and discovered the new World. Here there is no need to repeat Columbus in the second clause. Similarly
The right kind of language skills will give us the power, eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but (the right kind of language skills) will take lot of resources.

Usage of the same subject or its pronoun is even considered redundant sometimes.
The choice is B

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Re: The right kind of language skills [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 07:47
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daagh wrote:
Point on narenn: It is not that all compound sentences that are joined by fanboys must each have subject and verb. If the subject of the first clause can hold good for the second clause too, it is perfectly parallel to elide the subject in the second clause
Ex: Columbus ruthlessly marshaled his resources and discovered the new World. Here there is no need to repeat Columbus in the second clause. Similarly
The right kind of language skills will give us the power, eloquence, and an articulacy that can draw business and win customers, but (the right kind of language skills) will take lot of resources.
Usage of the same subject or its pronoun is even considered redundant sometimes.


Thank you daagh for making an important point. :) Let me take the opportunity to learn from this mistake.

My doubt is whether or not to repeat the subject in second independent clause if the FANBOYS is preceded by a comma.

In the example sentence given by you, comma is not placed before 'AND'
Columbus ruthlessly marshaled his resources and discovered the new World.
While it is perfectly correct to have a common subject for two predicates or clauses separated by the coordinating conjunction. e.g. [Subject] [Predicate1] [FANBOYS] [Predicate2]

But will this still hold true when the clauses are separated by comma + fanboys.

Following are the examples from KAPLAN Verbal Foundation Book.
Kaplan Verbal Foundation, 2009Edition, Page No 12 wrote:
[I would like to go], but [I can't].
[Sam is working today], so [he can't go either].


In Chapter No 14 - Commas, The Kaplan describes following rule about the usage of a Comma while connecting Independent clauses.
Kaplan Verbal Foundation, 2009Edition, Page No 249-250 wrote:
Place the comma at the end of the first clause before the coordinating conjunction. If both clauses are short and there's no chance for confusion, you can omit the comma. On the other hand, you may want to keep that comma for effect.
Anuj always loved animals, so I'm not surprised that he is a veterinarian.
I love you and you love me.
I love you, but you don't love me.



Based on the above examples I have made up my mind to repeat the subject in second independent clause if the FANBOYS is preceded by a comma.

I want to clear this doubt so that such mistakes can be avoided in future.

Thanks and Regards,

Narenn
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Re: The right kind of language skills [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 09:20
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@narenn

Can you kindly look into the following" official" exaples on this issue?.

GPrep sample
Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, the first woman to draw a soldier´s pension, joined the Continental Army in 1782 at the age of 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become too ill to serve. --- Correct Answer is A.


A. 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become
B. 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become
C. 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being
D. 22, injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was
E. 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being

You may see that the correct answer A uses a comma before the fanboy, but still does not repeat the subject Sampson;



OG example
The root systems of most flowering perennials either become too crowded, which results in loss in vigor, and spread too far outward, producing a bare center. Correct answer is D.

(A) which results in loss in vigor, and spread
(B) resulting in loss in vigor, or spreading
(C) with the result of loss of vigor, or spreading
(D) resulting in loss of vigor, or spread
(E) with a resulting loss of vigor, and spread

Here also the correct choice uses a comma before the fanboy (or) and still does not repeat the subject the root systems after or.
This is the GMAC thinking as far as I see;

I have no idea of Kaplan’s thinking on this point; but while I do regard your point, IMO, commas aren’t that great deciders in GMAT;
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Re: The right kind of language skills [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 09:31
I choose B but i was not sure it would be right or not.
B is using "For accomplishing". Generally these are wrong choices over choices with "to accomplish"

E was not next choice but it seems to confusing to understand the meaning.
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Re: The right kind of language skills [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 09:45
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@daagh

Thank you for addressing my query by citing the references from Official questions.

So, from this debate, I can safely conclude that we can add or omit the comma before FANBOYS, with our choice, provided that the intended meaning should remain intact and that the comma before FANBOYS can not be the factor in selection or elimination of the answer choice.

Regards,

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Re: The right kind of language skills [#permalink] New post 20 Sep 2013, 12:17
I got it right.. but took 3mints to get it... :(
how long did u guys took?
Re: The right kind of language skills   [#permalink] 20 Sep 2013, 12:17
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