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The rules of etiquette for formal dinner parties with

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The rules of etiquette for formal dinner parties with [#permalink] New post 05 Mar 2004, 11:43
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

50% (00:00) correct 50% (01:29) wrong based on 2 sessions
The rules of etiquette for formal dinner parties with foreign
diplomats require citizens from both the host and from the
diplomat's countries to be seated across from each other


(A) citizens from both the host and from the diplomat's
countries to be seated across from each other
(B) citizens of the host country and of the diplomat's party
to sit opposite each other
(C) that the host country and diplomat's country seat their
citizens opposite one another
(D) that citizens of the host country be seated opposite
those of the diplomat's country
(E) the host county's citizens to be seated opposite to
the diplomat's country's citizens

Vivek.
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 [#permalink] New post 05 Mar 2004, 19:12
I don't like "diplomat's country's citizens" in E, it is very convoluted. I will go with D too.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Mar 2004, 10:02
Hai paul, correct buddy "D" seems correct bcoz "E" has an awakward phrase diplomate's country's citizens.
But is it okay, if we add a clause started with active voice with Passive voice clause ?

"E" will look like this:
The rules reuire citizens of country X to be seated opposite to those of the diplomate's country.

Please reply,

Dharmin
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Mar 2004, 10:22
The correct answer is (D).
The original sentence (A) suffers from faulty parallelism. The second occurrence of "from" should be deleted to restore the proper parallelism between the phrases "the host" and "the diplomat's." At the same time, the word "both" is redundant in light of the words "the other" at the end of the sentence, thereby confusing the meaning of the sentence.

(B) remedies the original sentence's problems but presents a usage problem. The phrase "each other" should refer to only two persons or things. Because the potential number of "citizens" (guests) might exceed two, "one another" should be used instead.

(C) suggests a nonsensical meaning - that the country itself (rather than a person) seats its citizens. The construction also creates ambiguity as to what the rules require.

(D) remedies the original sentence's faulty parallelism by reconstructing the phrase, using the subjunctive form ("thatтАа be").

(E) is faulty in two respects. It includes the word "to" twice; the second occurrence is redundant and should be omitted. Also, the use of double possessive adjectives ("diplomat's" and "country's") is improper.

Vivek.
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 [#permalink] New post 06 Mar 2004, 10:27
Oh well, thx vivek for posting answer with explanation. Was about to provide an explanation to Dharmin but you just nailed it :wink:
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  [#permalink] 06 Mar 2004, 10:27
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