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The rules of etiquette for formal dinner parties with

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The rules of etiquette for formal dinner parties with [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 02:00
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A
B
C
D
E

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0% (00:00) correct 100% (00:54) wrong based on 1 sessions
The rules of etiquette for formal dinner parties with foreign diplomats require <citizens from both the host and from the diplomat's countries to be seated across from each other.>

A) citizens from both the host and from the diplomat's countries to be seated across from each other.

B) citizens of the host country and of the diplomat's party to sit opposite each other.

C) that the host country and diplomat's country seat their citizens opposite one another.

D) that citizens of the host's country be seated opposite those of the diplomat's country.

E) the host country's citizens to be seated opposite to the diplomat's country's citizens.

Is it grammatically incorrect to use two possesive adjectives as in the last option.
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Re: rules of etiquette - SC. [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 03:08
I'd go for D. There too, I'd like it to be worded like this
"that citizens of the host country be seated opposite those of the diplomat's country."

anuramm wrote:
E) the host country's citizens to be seated opposite to the diplomat's country's citizens.



Yes, E seems to have a problem. I don't know what, but it does not sound that good to me. I am unable to pin-point what the grammatical mistake here is (if there is one).

Ideas?
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Re: rules of etiquette - SC. [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 06:41
I don't think it is incorrect to use 2 possesives. But, here it doesn't make sensible sentence.

subjunctive mood: require (hypothetical situation--possibility) needs "be". D follows that.

some good info (webster commnet):

1.Miguel's and Cecilia's new cars are in the parking lot.
This means that each of them has at least one new car and that their ownership is a separate matter.

2.Miguel and Cecilia's new cars are in the parking lot.
This construction tells us that Miguel and Cecilia share ownership of these cars. The possessive (indicated by 's) belongs to the entire phrase, not just to Cecilia.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 08:30
I would go wid E ...

the idiom ''opposit to'' is the best ... and I believe only perfects that ....

hope that helps

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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 09:15
The OA is D.

The reason why E is wrong as per the book is -

(E) is faulty in two respects. It includes the word 'to' twice; the second occurrence is redundant and should be omitted. Also, the use of double possessive adjectives ('diplomat's' and 'country's') is improper.

I didn't know how to interpret improper - whether its always incoorect or its incorrect here.
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 09:37
well...

thanks a lot...

have fun :)
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 [#permalink] New post 19 Jul 2004, 14:35
what's wrong with C?

never mind, 'host country and diplomat's country' is unparallel. time to rest...
  [#permalink] 19 Jul 2004, 14:35
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