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The sudden outbreak of a devastating disease that has not

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The sudden outbreak of a devastating disease that has not [#permalink] New post 06 Mar 2009, 06:20
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  25% (low)

Question Stats:

62% (01:30) correct 37% (00:41) wrong based on 297 sessions
The sudden outbreak of a devastating disease that has not been reported before and which is unknown in cause is a rarity in modern medicine.

(A) which is unknown in cause
(B) whose cause is unknown
(C) is unknown as to its cause
(D) with a cause that is unknown
(E) unknown in cause

I went for E and got it wrong.
I see that E is wrong because "has not been reported" cannot be parallel with "unknown",
but I still don't see why OA is right.

I will post the OA soon :-D
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 06 Mar 2009, 06:33
cici wrote:
The sudden outbreak of a devastating disease that has not been reported before and which is unknown in cause is a rarity in modern medicine.

A) which is unknown in cause
B) whose cause is unknown
C) is unknown as to its cause
D) with a cause that is unknown
E) unknown in cause



I went for E and got it wrong.
I see that E is wrong because "has not been reported" cannot be parallel with "unknown",
but I still don't see why OA is right.

I will post the OA soon :-D


In B, whose should be used to modify a person, so B is wrong
C is awkward.
D. is weird to me. Obviously E is wrong.

That left A. sudden outbreak of a devastating disease that has not been reported before and (sudden outbreak of a devastating disease ) which is unknown in cause parallel. Both modifies the devastating disease.
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 06 Mar 2009, 06:59
OA pls !!
I think B is correct ..though not sure of the usage of whose in this context ..
A - sentence construction is very odd .
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 06 Mar 2009, 07:40
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tenaman10 wrote:
OA pls !!
I think B is correct ..though not sure of the usage of whose in this context ..
A - sentence construction is very odd .


Now, I think B might be correct. I just searched the use of whose in the dictionary.

adj.
The possessive form of who.
The possessive form of which.

Usage Note: It has sometimes been claimed that whose is properly used only as the possessive form of who and thus should be restricted to animate antecedents, as in a man whose power has greatly eroded. But there is extensive literary precedent for the use of whose with inanimate antecedents, as in The play, whose style is rigidly formal, is typical of the period. In an earlier survey this example was acceptable to a large majority of the Usage Panel. Those who avoid this usage employ of which: The play, the style of which is rigidly formal, is typical of the period. But as this example demonstrates, substituting of which may produce a stilted sentence.
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 06 Mar 2009, 07:45
C seems best to me.

Use of 'which' requires a noun immediately before it separated by a comma.
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 06 Mar 2009, 14:20
eileen1017 wrote:
tenaman10 wrote:
OA pls !!
I think B is correct ..though not sure of the usage of whose in this context ..
A - sentence construction is very odd .


Now, I think B might be correct. I just searched the use of whose in the dictionary.

adj.
The possessive form of who.
The possessive form of which.

Usage Note: It has sometimes been claimed that whose is properly used only as the possessive form of who and thus should be restricted to animate antecedents, as in a man whose power has greatly eroded. But there is extensive literary precedent for the use of whose with inanimate antecedents, as in The play, whose style is rigidly formal, is typical of the period. In an earlier survey this example was acceptable to a large majority of the Usage Panel. Those who avoid this usage employ of which: The play, the style of which is rigidly formal, is typical of the period. But as this example demonstrates, substituting of which may produce a stilted sentence.

In GMAT, "whose" applies to objects other than human as well.
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 07 Mar 2009, 16:39
A?

I had a debate between A and B, B - whose should refer to a person


A because, which can be used if this, that, these and those has already introduced an essential clause. In our sentence that has already been introduce as a essential clause. so we can use which to introduce the next clause

Gmat however states, we can use which only as a relative pronoun so I am confused...OA please
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 07 Mar 2009, 23:58
thank you all! :-D

The OA is B!!
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 08 Mar 2009, 09:52
cici wrote:
thank you all! :-D

The OA is B!!


I don't understand very well the OA... I'd say D because who/whose just apply to people

what's the source please?

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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 09 Mar 2009, 02:59
D is not parallel, plus as some people mentioned above, 'whose' can refer to things other than human :)
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 21 Dec 2009, 16:46
I'd say B as well.

Where was this question from?
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 25 Dec 2009, 17:40
cici wrote:
D is not parallel, plus as some people mentioned above, 'whose' can refer to things other than human :)


Can you explain to me how specifically b is parallel? Thanks!

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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 05 Apr 2010, 23:38
As far as I know, this question comes from PT.
And OA is B, as many of u mentioned.
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 06 Apr 2010, 00:41
Its B...
explanation given above.......
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 08 Apr 2010, 10:50
B for me.

The sudden outbreak of a devastating disease...(that clause) ..and ...(other clause).
You want the other clause to make sense even in absence of the first one. In this case it could be achieved by using (which or whose). The construction with which in the original sentence is awkward. So, go for whose.
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 28 Dec 2010, 09:44
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I went with A. thought we can use whose only with people. but yes whose can be used with either people or things. (source MGMAT SC. page 87)

e.g) the town whose power supply was contaminated.
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 28 Dec 2010, 11:35
I chose B because it sounded the most clear to me. However, can someone provide a detailed breakdown as to why the other choices are wrong? That would be helpful.
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 29 Dec 2010, 23:35
I guess I better look at "whose" again. I eliminated B upon seeing "whose" since it didn't reference a person.
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 29 Dec 2010, 23:36
cluelesss wrote:
I went with A. thought we can use whose only with people. but yes whose can be used with either people or things. (source MGMAT SC. page 87)

e.g) the town whose power supply was contaminated.


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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak [#permalink] New post 01 Jan 2011, 00:34
Firstly , "Whose" can also refer to things, not only human.
Secondly, the "Whose" clause parallels to the "That" clause.

Both of these are in MGMAT SC.
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Re: SC- the sudden outbreak   [#permalink] 01 Jan 2011, 00:34
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